Author Topic: Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps, Chanthaburi 1969  (Read 6653 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online Dizzyfugu

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 10249
    • Lots of works in my FlickR gallery
Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you the next chapter of the 'Turbo Fury' store (see here, V1.0: http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,39291.0.html), the Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969.

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


The Sea Fury was a British fighter aircraft designed and manufactured by Hawker. It was the last propeller-driven fighter to serve with the Royal Navy, and also one of the fastest production single piston-engined aircraft ever built. Developed during the Second World War, the Sea Fury entered service two years after the war ended. The Sea Fury proved to be a popular aircraft with a number of overseas militaries, and it was successfully used during the Korean War in the early 1950s where it could keep up with 1st generatiom jet fighters like the MiG-15.

The Sea Fury's development was formally initiated in 1943 in response to a wartime requirement of the RAF, thus the aircraft was initially named Fury. As the Second World War drew to a close, the RAF cancelled their order for the aircraft. However, the Royal Navy saw the type as a suitable carrier aircraft to replace a range of increasingly obsolete or poorly suited aircraft being operated by the Fleet Air Arm. Development of the Sea Fury proceeded, and the type began entering operational service in 1947.

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


The Sea Fury had many design similarities to Hawker's preceding Tempest fighter, but the Sea Fury was a considerably lighter aircraft. Both the Sea Fury's wings and fuselage originated from the Tempest but were significantly modified and redesigned. Production Sea Furies were fitted with the powerful Bristol Centaurus engine, and armed with four wing-mounted Hispano V 20mm cannons. While originally developed as a pure aerial fighter aircraft, the definitive Sea Fury FB 11 was a fighter-bomber, the design having been found suitable for this mission as well.

The Sea Fury attracted international orders as both a carrier and land-based aircraft; it was operated by countries including Australia, Burma, Canada, Cuba, Egypt, West Germany, Iraq, and Pakistan. The Sea Fury was retired by the majority of its military operators in the late 1950s in favour of jet-propelled aircraft. One of the largest export customers for the type, Pakistan, went a different way.

Originally, an initial order for 50 Sea Fury FB 60 aircraft for the Pakistan Air Force (PAF) was placed in 1949. A total of 87 new-build Sea Furies were purchased and delivered between 1950 and 1952, but some ex-FAA and Iraqi Sea Furies were also subsequently purchased.

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


The Sea Fury began to be replaced by the jet-powered North American F-86 Sabre in 1955, but it became quickly clear that the Sabre was primarily a fighter, not a ground attack aircraft. It also lacked adequate performance in 'hot and high' operation theatres, and the PAF's B-57 bombers were too big for certain CAS tasks, and their number highly limited.

Hence the decision was taken to modernize a part of the PAF Sea Fury fleet for the ground attack role. This was to be achieved with a better engine that would deliver more power, a better overall performance as well as an extended range for prolonged loiter times close to the potential battlefield.

Engine choice fell on the Allison T56 turboshaft engine, which had originally been developed for the C-130 Hercules transporter (later also installed in the P-3 and E-2) - the type had just been bought by the PAF, so that low maintenance cost due to parts and infrastructure commonality was expected. Pakistan Aeronautical Complex (commonly abbreviated 'PAC') was tasked to develop a suitable update, and this lead to the integration of a turboprop engine into the Sea Fury airframe.

For the relatively small Sea Fury airframe the T56 was downrated to 3.000 hp, to which approximately 750 lbs of thrust from its exhaust could be added. The latter was bifurcated and ran along the fuselage flanks, ending in fairings at the wings' trailing edge. In order to cope with the additional power, the original five-bladed propeller had to be replaced by a six-bladed, indigenously developed propeller. Together with the more pointed spinner and the raised propeller position, the Sea Fury's profile changed dramatically, even though the good field of view for the pilot was retained. Officially, the modified machines were just called 'Sea Fury FB.61', inofficially they were called 'Turbo Furies' or  'وایلار' (Urdu: Wailer), for their characteristic, penetrating engine and propeller sound.

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


Internally, structural reinforcements had to be made and new wing spars were introduced. These allowed higher g forces for low level maneuvers and also carried additional ordnance hardpoints under the outer wings - these enabled the aircraft to carry HVARs of American origin and/or several small caliber bombs instead of only a single pair of up to 1.000 lb (454 kg) caliber.

The last piston engine Sea Furies in Pakistani service were ultimately retired in 1960, while the Turbo Fury fleet was used throughout the 1965 India-Pakistan War. After the end of hostilities, the 'Turbo Furies' were quickly phased out since it had become clear that they had become too vulnerable in battlefield conditions.

Some of these machines was sold to Thailand, though. Due to its close proximity with Thailand, Vietnam's conflict was closely monitored by Bangkok. Thai involvement in Vietnam did not become official until the total involvement of the United States in 1963, and Thailand allowed the United States Air Force in Thailand to use air bases and naval bases for U.S. forces. Furthermore, constant border disputes with Cambodia urged the government to enlarge the military arsenal.

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


As a consequence, the Royal Thai Marine Corps received 13 Turbo Furys for the CAS role in 1966. Actually, these were the first aircraft for the naval air arm since 1951, because after a coup attempt by the Navy to overthrow the prime minister Phibun Songkhram the Government had decided to remove all planes from the Navy and give it to the Royal Thai Air Force.

The Thai Turbo Furys saw frequent use: The Chanthaburi and Trat borders with Cambodia gave the Marine Corps Department its first assignment, safeguarding the coastline and southeastern border. Since 1970 the Marine Corps' Chanthaburi-Trat Task Force had been officially assigned the defense of this area.

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


During 1972 and 1973, Thai Marines were involved in the "Sam-Chai" anti-communist operations in Phetchabun Province and the "Pha-Phum" anti-communist operations in Chiang Rai Province. In 1973 and 1974, they took part in anti-communist operations in the southern provinces of Pattani, Yala and Narathiwat.

Since 1975, Thai Marines have been assigned to Narathiwat as Marine Corps special forces, and this. after ten years of frequent and successful use, was the end of the Thai Tubro Furies - the type was retired in late 1975. Two specimen were sold into the USA and the remaining airframes (a total of 5 had been lost, two through accidents and three had been shot down by AA fire) were scrapped.



General characteristics
    Crew: One
    Length: 36 ft 2 in (11.05 m)
    Wingspan: 38 ft 43⁄4 in (11.69 m)
    Height: 15 ft 101⁄2 in (4.84 m)
    Wing area: 280 ft2 (26.01 m2)
    Empty weight: 10.500 lb (4.767 kg)
    Loaded weight: 14,100 lb (6.400 kg)
    Max. takeoff weight: 15,650 lb (7.105 kg)

Powerplant:
    1 Allison T56 turboshaft engine rated at 2.206 kW (3.000 hp) plus 750 lbs of residual thrust

Performance:
    Maximum speed: 490 mph (427 knots, 790 km/h) at 18,000 ft (5,500 m)
    Range: 700 mi (609 nmi, 1,126 km) with internal fuel;
               1,040 mi (904 nmi, 1,674 km) with two drop tanks
    Service ceiling: 35,800 ft (10,910 m)
    Rate of climb: 4,320 ft/min (21.9 m/s)

Armament:
    4 20 mm (.79 in) Hispano Mk V cannons in the wings
    Eight underwing hardpoints for an external load of 4.000 lb (1.814 kg),
    including bombs, unguided rockets, napalm tanks or drop tanks



The kit and its assembly:
This is the second build of the same kit conversion idea - spinning forth the initial fictional background story. Well, the combination of a WWII figher design and a C-130 Hercules sounds unlikely, but that's what I built. The idea of revamped piston-engine aircraft for a post-WWII-use has its charm and continually brings forth impressive designs, so here's another contribution to that wild bunch of whifs.

Inspiration came with a set of 1:72 aftermarket C-130J resin engine nacelles from OzMods, which I had bunkered a while ago. This time the engine was mated to a two-seater, the simple but solid "Bagdad Fury" from Pioneer2/PM Models. The Hercules engines are an almost perfect fit - the original fuselage just had to be cut away behind the original exhaust reflectors. Some sculpting had to be done on both sides, and the wing roots filled up in order to match the new, more narrow engine, but things went really smoothly. Additionally, the rear cockpit opening had to be faired over, and the canopy had to be adjusted a little.

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


For the turboprop's exhaust I drilled up oval holes on the fuselage flanks, under the cockpit, and inserted styrene tubes - the best position I could think of?

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


The spinner comes from the OzMods set, too, but the C-130J sickle-shaped propeller blades were just a bit too modern and too large for the Sea Fury. I was lucky to have some spare blades from a Pavla propeller set for the Academy B-24 Liberator - these were attached to the pointed spinner, and it looks menacing!

Otherwise, only littel things were changed. In the cockpit a new seat and a dashboard cover were added. The underwing hardpoints were new, too, and I added some antennae for a more modern and purposeful look of the aicraft.

All pylons are new, and the bomb ordnance was puzzled together from the spares box (P-47 drop tanks and four unguided rocket pods from the Revell G.91).


Painting and markings:
When searching for a potential user after the PAF I came across Thailand; the country had operated a handful of Fairey Fireflys after WWII, but these had to be retired in the early 50ies and the Thai Navy lost its air arm. These machine probably carried standard Extra Dark Sea Grey/Sky liveries.

One of these is on display in the Thai Air Force museum - and probably in a garish, non-authentic livery with a light blue underside, and very light grey uppers. Anyway, it looks odd enough to incorporate the concept onto my whiffy Turbo Fury...

The basic colors are Revell 57 (RAL 7000, very close to FS 35237) and FS 34515 for the lower sides. The Thailand (Navy) markings come from a Fairey Firefly aftermarket decal sheet, and suit the Fury well. Tactical codes and the "RTMC.

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


The cockpit interior was kept in very dark gray, the landing gear is in Aluminum.

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Hawker-PAC 'Turbo Fury'; aircraft '01' of the Royal Thai Marine Corps (นาวิกโยธินแห่งราชอาณาจักรไทย); Chanthaburi region, 1969 (Whif/PM Model kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr




Again,  the "Turbo Fury" looks very conclusive, and the conversion is rather simple. Acutally, I might add a third chapter and build another one, since history opens an interesting "final use" to this aircraft. Maybe more in some time...

Offline Old Wombat

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 8625
  • Armour: The Gods of War love it!
Nice little life-extender for the Fury!

Logical & elegant! :thumbsup:
Has a life outside of What-If & wishes it would stop interfering!

"The purpose of all War is Peace" - St. Augustine

veritas ad mortus veritas est

Online Dizzyfugu

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 10249
    • Lots of works in my FlickR gallery
Thank you.

BTW, this is the inspirational benchmark:


Online PR19_Kit

  • Closeted Take That fan
  • What-IF SIG
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 33741
  • Whiffing since the 70s
Blimey, I disn't know the Thais had Fireflies!  :o

The Turbo Fury looks even better in that version Thomas, the engine fits like it was made for it.  :thumbsup: :bow:
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

Offline sandiego89

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2783
Really great dizzy,  :thumbsup:

Only thing I can think of is the exhaust stacks as your stated "the best position I could think of?"

A cutaway view of a Sea Fury such as here http://aviadejavu.ru/Site/Crafts/Craft20542-6.htm
would show your exhaust pipes going right through the main fuel tank in front of the cockpit, and perhaps the cockpit side consols as well - you would really have to cut down on the size of the tank to route the pipes- you also don't want hot pipes right next to the main fuel tank.  

Perhaps a monster side stack more forward, like a enforcer mustang? http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v450/Hacker15E/pe1-1.jpg
maybe not as elegant, but perhaps more realistic as there is not a lot of room in there for long stacks?

Please not a criticism, I only mentioned it at you seemed to ponder over placement yourself. I used bent aluminum rod for my jet powered P-38 WHIF and that worked pretty well as you can bend it- not like styrene.

  



Dave "Sandiego89"
Chesapeake, Virginia, USA

Offline Flyer

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2728
Another well done Turbo Fury. Looks great :bow:

Again,  the "Turbo Fury" looks very conclusive, and the conversion is rather simple. Acutally, I might add a third chapter and build another one, since history opens an interesting "final use" to this aircraft. Maybe more in some time...

R.A.N? ;)
Everything is theoretically impossible, until it is done. -Robert A. Heinlein

Online Dizzyfugu

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 10249
    • Lots of works in my FlickR gallery
Blimey, I disn't know the Thais had Fireflies!  :o

The Turbo Fury looks even better in that version Thomas, the engine fits like it was made for it.  :thumbsup: :bow:

Thank you - it's the paint scheme: it compliments the longer, pointed nose VERY well! I actually would like to see one in RN or RCN colors/markings, should look superb! An all-blue RAN aircraft should also look nice - but I have already different (and maybe odd) plans for the third one. But there's still one C-130 engine left... :rolleyes: Maybe an all-dark blue RCN machine, as the best of both worlds?
Not certain about enough B-24 blades, though, but more can be ordered.  :wacko:

@sandiego: no criticism perceived. I did not check the internal layout of the original Sea Fury but assumed that the nose would have had to be considerably modified internally; a PA-48 style side exhaust would have been an option, as well as a ventral opening, but I eventually settled for "dual sidepipes", rather for the look (a bit Wyvern-like). ;)

Online NARSES2

  • Nick was always on his mind - just ask the Pet Shop Boys
  • Global Moderator
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 41237
Oh I like that a lot  :bow:
Decals my @r$e!

Online Dizzyfugu

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 10249
    • Lots of works in my FlickR gallery
Thank you, too!  :cheers:

Offline kitbasher

  • What-IF SIG
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 4414
  • bashes kits
Got me wanting to do a TurboFury myself.

All I'd do differently is remove the wing intakes (maybe - probably yes) and reposition the lower intake on the C-130J nacelle to the side.  I say that probably under the influence of photos of the Sabre Fury prototype (https://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/7585370622/)

Checking out the OzMod prices right now!
« Last Edit: September 13, 2014, 03:52:03 am by kitbasher »
What If? & Secret Project SIG member.
On the go: Arrow, Beaumaris, Battle, Bronco GA.1, Barracuda II, CASA 2.217, Corsair GR.1, EE P12, Frankenfighter, Hawker P1067, Hellcat IV, Ice Cream Tank, JP T4, Jumo MiG-15, Macchi MC.205, Phantom FG1, Puffin, Sea Hawk T7, Spitfire XII, Ta154, Val.

Online Dizzyfugu

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 10249
    • Lots of works in my FlickR gallery
Got me wanting to do a TurboFury myself.

All I'd do differently is remove the wing intakes (maybe - probably yes) and reposition the lower intake on the C-130J nacelle to the side.  I say that probably under the influence of photos of the Sabre Fury prototype (https://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/7585370622/)

Checking out the OzMod prices right now!

Yes, the oil coolers in the wing roots are actually superfluous, with the oil cooler under the C-130 nacelle, which I kept.  ;)

Offline kitbasher

  • What-IF SIG
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 4414
  • bashes kits
Got me wanting to do a TurboFury myself.

All I'd do differently is remove the wing intakes (maybe - probably yes) and reposition the lower intake on the C-130J nacelle to the side.  I say that probably under the influence of photos of the Sabre Fury prototype (https://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/7585370622/)

Checking out the OzMod prices right now!

Yes, the oil coolers in the wing roots are actually superfluous, with the oil cooler under the C-130 nacelle, which I kept.  ;)

Or I guess modify the leading edge  intakes and dispense with the nose intake altogether.
What If? & Secret Project SIG member.
On the go: Arrow, Beaumaris, Battle, Bronco GA.1, Barracuda II, CASA 2.217, Corsair GR.1, EE P12, Frankenfighter, Hawker P1067, Hellcat IV, Ice Cream Tank, JP T4, Jumo MiG-15, Macchi MC.205, Phantom FG1, Puffin, Sea Hawk T7, Spitfire XII, Ta154, Val.

Online Dizzyfugu

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 10249
    • Lots of works in my FlickR gallery
Work on number 3 started. I am busy at work right now, so I won't tackle big/complex projects, and "another" Turbo Fury is just the right distraction...  :rolleyes:

Online NARSES2

  • Nick was always on his mind - just ask the Pet Shop Boys
  • Global Moderator
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 41237
Flippin Ada the lad manages to work as well as model  :blink: Definitely got a time/space portal hidden away somewhere  ;D
Decals my @r$e!

Offline loupgarou

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 1630
Flippin Ada the lad manages to work as well as model  :blink: Definitely got a time/space portal hidden away somewhere  ;D

And he's even working on sunday... or he is in another time frame.... :o ;D
Owing to the current financial difficulties, the light at the end of the tunnel will be turned off until further notice.