Author Topic: DONE @p. 2: 1:72 Saab P29G ("Kurviga Tunnan") supersonic research aircraft  (Read 1085 times)

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Offline zenrat

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Third picture up from the bottom has an almost Russian vibe to it.  But i'm not getting it as strongly from the others.
I'm not getting French though.  At least not 100% French.  Maybe a French/German collaboration?
Fred

Another ill conceived, lazily thought out, crudely executed and badly painted piece of half arsed what-if modelling muppetry from zenrat industries.

Offline DogfighterZen

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I'm getting the French vibe cause it somehow reminded me of the Mystere IV... Maybe because of the intake? What's obvious is that you've done a great job as always, Dizzy. :bow: :bow:
"Sticks and stones may break some bones but a 3.57's gonna blow your damn head off!!"

Offline NARSES2

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I must admit that depending on which picture I look at it could either be a Dassault or a Mig project and that's part of the beauty of it  :thumbsup:
Decals my @r$e!

Offline loupgarou

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I must admit that depending on which picture I look at it could either be a Dassault or a Mig project and that's part of the beauty of it  :thumbsup:

Exactly! So if Dizzy uses decals from a country that could have bought fighters from either, JMNs would be stumped forever.  :wacko:
Owing to the current financial difficulties, the light at the end of the tunnel will be turned off until further notice.

Offline Tophe

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In the meantime this build has been finished, beauty shots have been made but need editing
probably it will be very nice, seeing the model up to now. :thumbsup:
[the word "realistic" hurts my heart...]

Offline kerick

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That is certainly a whole new look for the J29!!!
Awesome as always!
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When I looked at it, all I saw was an up-dated & up-rated J29.  I think you did a fantastic job of developing the old girl - she looks very plausible.  Well done, sir- well done!   :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
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DONE @p. 2: 1:72 Saab P29G ("Kurviga Tunnan") supersonic research aircraft
« Reply #22 on: August 05, 2019, 10:31:37 am »

1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr



Some background:
In the aftermath of the Second World War, Sweden required a strong air defense, utilizing the newly developed jet propulsion technology. The original concept had been designed around a mostly straight wing, but after Swedish engineers had obtained German research data on swept-wing designs, the prototype was altered to incorporate a 25° sweep. In order to make the wing as thin as possible, Saab elected to locate the retractable undercarriage in the aircraft's fuselage rather than into the wings.

Extensive wind tunnel testing had also influenced aspects of the aircraft's aerodynamics, such as stability and trim across the aircraft's speed range. In order to test the design of the swept wing further and avoid any surprises, it was decided to modify a Saab Safir. It received the designation Saab 201 and a full-scale swept wing for a series of flight tests. The first 'final' sketches of the aircraft, incorporating the new information, were drawn in January 1946.

The originally envisioned powerplant for the new fighter type was the de Havilland Goblin turbojet engine. However, in December 1945, information on the newer and more powerful de Havilland Ghost engine became available. The new engine was deemed to be ideal for Saab's in-development aircraft, as not only did the Ghost engine had provisions for the use of a central circular air intake, the overall diameter of the engine was favorable for the planned fuselage dimensions, too. Thus, following negotiations between de Havilland and Saab, the Ghost engine was selected to power the type and built in license as the RM 2.


1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


By February 1946 the main outline of the proposed aircraft had been clearly defined. In autumn 1946, following the resolution of all major questions of principal and the completion of the project specification, the Swedish Air Force formally ordered the completion of the design and that three prototype aircraft be produced, giving the proposed type the designation J 29. After a thorough test program, production of the type commenced in 1948 and, in May 1951, the first deliveries of operational production aircraft were received by F 13 Norrköping. The J 29 proved to be very successful and several variants and updates of the Tunnan were produced, including a dedicated reconnaissance variant, a two seat trainer and an all-weather fighter with an onboard radar.

However, Sweden foresaw that there would soon be a need for a jet fighter that could intercept bombers at high altitude and also successfully engage fighters. During September 1949, the Swedish Air Force, via the Swedish Defence Material Administration, released a requirement for a cutting-edge interceptor aircraft that was envisioned to be capable of attacking hostile bomber aircraft in the transonic speed range. As released, this requirement specified a top speed of Mach speed 1.4 to 1.5. (1956, the specified speed was revised and raised to Mach 1.7-1.8, and eventually led to the Saab 35 Draken). With the barely supersonic Saab 32 Lansen just under development, and intended for different roles than being a nimble day fighter, the company searched for a way to either achieve supersonic flight through modifications of an existing type or at least gather sufficient data and develop and try the new technologies necessary to meet the 1949 requirements.


1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


Since Sweden did not have a truly supersonic aircraft in its inventory (not even an experimental type), Saab decided to convert the Saab 29 into a supersonic testbed, with the outlook to develop an interim day fighter that could replace the various Tunnan fighter versions and support the new Lansen fleet until a fully capable Mach 1.5+ interceptor was ready for service. Even though the type was regarded as a pure experimental aircraft, the designation remained close to the J29 nomenclature in order to secure military funding for the project and to confuse eventual spies. Consequently, the P29 was initially presented as a new J29 version (hence the “G” suffix).

The P29G was based on a heavily modified production J29B airframe, which was built in two versions and only in two specimens. Work on the first airframe started in 1952, just when the first Saab 32 prototype made its maiden flight. The initial challenge consisted of integrating two relatively compact axial flow jet engines with afterburners into the fuselage, since the J29’s original RM2, even in its late afterburner variant, was not able to safely deliver the necessary thrust for the intended supersonic flight program. After long negotiations, Saab was able to procure a small number of Westinghouse J34-WE-42 turbojets from the USA, which delivered as a pair 40% more thrust than the original RM2B. The engines were only delivered under the restriction that they would exclusively be used in connection with the supersonic research program.

Through a thorough re-construction, the Saab team was able to mount the new engines into the lower rear fuselage, and, internally, the air intake duct had to be modified and forked behind the landing gear wells. Due to the significantly widened rear fuselage, the P29G became quickly nicknamed “Kurviga Tunnan” (= “Curvy Barrel”). Even though the widened rear fuselage increased the aircraft’s frontal cross section, the modified shape had the (unintended) effect of area ruling, a welcome side benefit which became apparent during the flight test and which largely promoted the P29G’s gain of top speed.

Another special and unique feature of the P29G was a special wing attachment system. It consisted of two strengthened, open box spars in the fuselage with additional attachment points along the wing roots, which allowed different wings to be switched with relatively little effort. However, due to this modification, the wing tanks (with a total capacity of 900l inside of the J29s standard wings) were lost and only 2.150l in the Saab 29’s standard fuselage tanks could be carried – but this was, for a research aircraft, not regarded as a major weakness, and compensated for the wing attachment system’s additional weight. The original wing-mounted pitots were replaced by a single, massive sensor boom attached to the aircraft’s nose above the air intake, slightly set-off to starboard in order to give the pilot an unobstructed view.



1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


The first P29G's maiden flight, marked “Gul Urban” (Yellow U), took place in July 1955. The aircraft behaved normally, even though the center of gravity had markedly shifted backwards and the overall gain of weight made the aircraft slightly unstable along the longitudinal axis. During the initial, careful attempts to break the sound barrier, it soon became apparent that both the original wings as well as the original air intake shape limited the P29G's potential. In its original form, the P29G could only barely pass Mach 1 in level flight.

As a consequence, the second P29G, which had been under conversion from another J29B airframe since mid-1954, received more thorough modifications. The air intake was lengthened and widened, and in order to make it more effective at supersonic speed it received a sharp lip. Wind tunnel tests with the first machine led to a modified tail, too: the fin was now taller and further swept back, the stabilizer was moved to a higher position, resulting in a cruciform layout. The original single-piece stabilizer was furthermore replaced by a two-piece, all-moving construction with a 45° sweep and a thinner profile. This not only improved the aerodynamics at high speed, it also suppressed the longitudinal instability problem, even though this was never really cured.

Due to the even higher all-up weight of the new aircraft, the landing gear was reinforced and the 2nd P29G received an experimental suspension system on its main legs with higher spring travel, which was designed for operations on semi-prepared airfields. This system had actually been designed for the updated J29 fighters (esp. the A32B attack variant), but it was not introduced into series production or the Saab 29E/F conversion program. Despite these massive changes, the P29G designation was retained, and the second machine, carrying the tactical code “Röd Urban” (Red U), was quickly nicknamed “Karpen” (“Carp”), due to its characteristic new intake shape, the long fin and its stocky shape.


1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


The second P29G was ready for flight tests in August 1956, just in time to support the Saab 35’s ongoing development – the aircraft, which was eventually built to meet (and exceed) the Swedish Air Force’s 1949 supersonic interceptor requirement. The modifications proved to be successful and the P29G was, fitted with a 60° sweep wing and in clean configuration, able to achieve a maximum speed of 1.367 km/h (849 mph) in level flight, a formidable achievement (vs. the 1,060 km/h (660 mph) of the late J29F and the 1200 km/h (745 mph) of the J32B interceptor) for the post WWII design.
Several wing shapes and profiles were tested, including sweep angles from 25° to 63° as well as different shapes and profiles. Even though the machines carried provisions for the J29’s standard armament, the 20 mm cannons were normally not mounted and replaced with sensors and recording equipment. However, both machines were temporarily fitted with one or two guns in order to analyze the effects of firing the weapons at supersonic speed. Underwing ordnance was also almost never carried. In some tests, though, light bombs or unguided missiles were carried and deployed, or podded cine cameras were carried.

While the second P29G was used for high speed trials, the first machine remained in its original guise and took over low speed handling tests. Thanks to the unique wing switch mechanism, the supersonic research program could be held within a very tight schedule and lasted until late 1959. Thereafter, the P29Gs’ potential was of little use anymore, and the engine use agreement with the USA put an end to further use of the two aircraft, so that both P29Gs were retired from service in 1960. The 1st machine, outfitted with standard J29F wings and stripped off of its engines, remained in use as an instructional air at Malmslätt air base 1969, while the second machine was mothballed. However, both airframes were eventually scrapped in 1970.




General characteristics:
    Crew: 1
    Length: 11.66 m (38 ft 2 in) fuselage only,
            13,97 m (45 ft 9 in) with pitot boom
    Wingspan: varied*; 11.0 m (36 ft 1 in) with standard 25° sweep wings,
                        10.00 m (32 ft 9 ¾ in) with experimental 45° wings
    Height: 4.54m (14 ft 10 ½ in)
    Wing area: varied*; 24.15 m² (260.0 ft²) with standard 25° sweep wings
                        22.5 m² (242.2 ft²) with experimental 45° wings
    Empty weight: 5,220 kg (11,500 lb)
    Max. takeoff weight: 8,510 kg (18,744 lb)

Powerplant:
    2× Westinghouse J34-WE-42 turbojets, each rated at 3,400 lbf (15 kN) dry thrust
       and 4,200 lbf (19 kN) with full afterburner

Performance:
    Maximum speed: 1.367 km/h (849 mph) were achieved*
    Range: 790 km (490 mi)
    Service ceiling: up to 17,250 m (56,500 ft)*
    Rate of climb: up to 45 m/s (8,850 ft/min)*

*Varying figures due to different tested wing configurations

Armament:

    None installed; provisions for 4x 20mm Hispano Mark V autocannon in the lower front fuselage.
    Depending on the mounted wing type, various external loads could be carried, including a wide range of light bombs,
    75 mm (3 in) air-to-air rockets, 145 mm (5.8 in) anti-armor rockets, 150 mm (6 in) HE (high-explosive) rockets or
    180 mm (7.2 in) HE anti-ship rockets.
    Due to the lack of complex wiring or fuel plumbing, no guided weapons or drop tanks could be mounted, though.




1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab P29G “Kurviga Tunnan” a.k.a. “Karpen“; 2nd prototype “Röd Urban” (s/n 29488), fitted with experimental 45° wings, Swedish Air Force during high speed trials; Malmslätt, Sweden, summer 1959 (Whif/Matchbox kit conversion)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

Offline Tophe

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Congratulations! :thumbsup:
[the word "realistic" hurts my heart...]

Offline TomZ

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Looks very realistic.

Great!

TomZ
Reality is an illusion caused by an alcohol deficiency

Offline PR19_Kit

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Absolutely amazing, and the backstory is a work of genius.  :thumbsup:

Nominated for a Whiffie.  ;D
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

Online Dizzyfugu

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OMG, thanks a lot! Glad you like it!  <_<

Offline Old Wombat

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Oddly that looks very good! :o :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
Has a life outside of What-If & wishes it would stop interfering!

"The purpose of all War is Peace" - St. Augustine

veritas ad mortus veritas est

Offline zenrat

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Nice job Dizz.  The NMF is good.
 :thumbsup:
Fred

Another ill conceived, lazily thought out, crudely executed and badly painted piece of half arsed what-if modelling muppetry from zenrat industries.

Offline NARSES2

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That is fantastic  :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Decals my @r$e!