Author Topic: Finished Builds: Models  (Read 20208 times)

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Offline tigercat

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Re: Finished Builds: Models
« Reply #30 on: June 07, 2011, 11:22:23 pm »
http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,32448.0.html

Flosshilde

 Flosshilde is a HE 277 adapted for film work post WW2. Given the lack of allied aircraft German film makers were forced to adapt what was at hand which were war surplus 4 engined Heinkels. Flosshilde has detachable fin plates which can be added to depict Halifaxs and Lancasters when this is so the central fin is painted blue  

After its film career it was adopted by the private owners who exhibit at airshows round the greater Reich

Flosshilde has appeared in amongst others:

Terrorflieger
Terrorflieger 2
Operation Seelowe
Nicht der das Uhu






« Last Edit: June 07, 2011, 11:31:04 pm by tigercat »

Offline tigercat

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Re: Finished Builds: Models
« Reply #31 on: June 07, 2011, 11:35:01 pm »
Heinkel 478

http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,32452.0.html

Here is shown a specially adapted Heinkel He 478.  the He 478 had mixed powerplants this extra power of the 2 tail mounted Jumo engines allowed it to lift greater loads which made it ideal for transporting componets for Germany's rocket and missile programme.

Some test were conducted into the firing of the V2  from an aircraft. New fuels were developed to make this feasible after some initial successes the programme was abandoned after the death of it's chief test pilot and the destruction of 2 of the prototypes.


While testing was underway one aircraft did encounter allied fighter bombers and in their haste to get rid of their load to gain extra manoeuvrability ignited the rocket without first disengaging the clamps. Interviews with the allied pilots concerned tend to indicate that the He 478 broke the sound barrier before disintegrating and ploughing into a flak tower.

This example is called Hornisse by it's crew.



Offline PACOPEPE

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« Reply #32 on: June 08, 2011, 09:42:00 am »
« Last Edit: June 08, 2011, 02:30:21 pm by PACOPEPE »

Offline tigercat

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Re: Finished Builds: Models
« Reply #33 on: June 08, 2011, 11:22:28 pm »
http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,32491.0.html

Dixie Nixie

Given the sucess on the airshow circuit and film work with Flosshilde  Joachim Von Stahlein (no relation) bought another of the numerous Greif variants which were going cheap post war as surplus and sticking to the Rhinemaiden theme  created Dixie Nixie in order to represent the American contingent

Dixie starred in

Terror uber New York
Rot Tailed bedrohung
Nacht des Eule
Terrorflieger 3 - Amerikaner sind kommenden
Strand Bikini Partei 7
die ganze Nacht lang


  

« Last Edit: June 08, 2011, 11:25:04 pm by tigercat »

Offline tigercat

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Re: Finished Builds: Models
« Reply #34 on: June 08, 2011, 11:30:10 pm »

He 277 Aeronavale evaluation aircraft

http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,32453.0.html

A dozen He 277 were built in France by the Societe des Usines Farman (SAUF) firm in Suresnes.
     When the approach of Allied forces necessitated the evacuation of Heinkel personnel working on the project orders were therefore given to destroy  the prototypes and the pre production aircraft. However a resistance raid captured the facility before more than minor damage coulld be done and repairs were begun after the Allied occupation.

The He 277 was repaired by Ateliers Aéronautiques de Suresnes(AAS) and used by the Aeronavale.  The He 277's  were eventually  withdrawn from service and broken up in late 1955. The last  in 1957 after serving as "mother ships" for aerial launching of a number of early French advanced jet and rocket test aircraft.










Offline Brian da Basher

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Re: Finished Builds: Models
« Reply #35 on: June 11, 2011, 12:43:03 pm »
Here's something I call the B-337 Supercruiser. The base kit is a 1/144 Minicraft B-29. Build thread and backstory are here:

http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,32767.0.html

Enjoy!







 :cheers:
Brian da Basher

Offline tigercat

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Re: Finished Builds: Models
« Reply #36 on: June 12, 2011, 05:35:03 am »
http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,32769.0.html

The Supermarine Sailfish was directly inspired by the (modest) successes experienced by the Imperial Japanese Navy with seaplane fighters such as the Nakajima A6M2-N (an adaptation of the Mitsubishi Zero) and the Kawanishi N1K. In theory, seaplanes were ideally suited to conditions in the Pacific theatre, and could turn any relatively calm area of coast into an airbase. The Sailfish was constructed to meet specification E.6/44. The same specification that the Saunders-Roe SR.A/1  was built to.

Building on their experience of seaplanes and amphibians Supermarine built a fighter with a powerful punch

of 4x 20mm cannon and 2x 30mm cannon.

The Sailfish could reach speeds of 579mph



Offline kitbasher

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Re: Finished Builds: Models
« Reply #37 on: June 12, 2011, 08:53:02 am »
Bristol Beaufighter FB.11, SR937 'J', 211 Sqn RAF, 1946.

Production of the multi-role Griffon-engined Beaufighter FB.11 followed the last batch of Mk 10s (the final Beaufighter TF.X being SR919) from late 1945 to early 1946.  The FB.11 saw service mostly in South East Asia against Japan, as World War II continued into 1946.  The type continued to serve as part of the Commonwealth Air Forces of Occupation following Japan's surrender after the dropping of the atomic bombs (products of the much-delayed 'Manhattan Project') in September 1946.





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« Last Edit: June 12, 2011, 10:36:58 am by kitbasher »
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Offline tigercat

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Re: Finished Builds: Models
« Reply #38 on: June 12, 2011, 11:22:36 am »
http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,32779.0.html

Handley Page Harwich

The Handley Page Harwich  was originally designed as a strategic bomber for the Fleet Air Arm. It entered service in the early-1950s. In the post-Second World War war period, the British authorities felt there was a need for an independent tactical bombing capability. It was designed to operate from the revised Malta Class carriers. It was modified to give the Royal Navy a  tactical nuclear strike capacity. For many years after its introduction, it was also the heaviest aircraft to enter operational status operating from an aircraft carrier.






« Last Edit: June 12, 2011, 11:24:59 am by tigercat »

Offline tigercat

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Re: Finished Builds: Models
« Reply #39 on: June 12, 2011, 12:52:15 pm »
Miles Scorpio

Postwar Miles aircraft obtained the licence to manafacture the Heinkel He 162 as a sports aircraft. Following good feedback from pilots they recognised its potential:

"The difficulties experienced by the He 162 were caused mainly by its rush into production, not by any inherent design flaws. One experienced Luftwaffe pilot who flew it called it a "first-class combat aircraft." This opinion was mirrored by Eric "Winkle" Brown of the Fleet Air Arm (FAA), who flew it not only during post-war evaluations, but went on to fly it for fun after testing had completed. He considered it delightful to fly, although the very light controls made it suitable only for experienced pilots. He wrote about his 162 flights in Wings of the Luftwaffe, a description that has been reprinted in many media over the years. Brown had been warned to treat the rudder with suspicion due to a number of in-flight failures."

Recognising this inherent flaw Miles redesigned the tail and replaced the engine with a Bristol Phoenix diesel engine which increased fuel efficency and created a handy little sports aircraft


Offline tigercat

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Re: Finished Builds: Models
« Reply #40 on: June 12, 2011, 02:46:32 pm »
http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,32781.0.html

Fairey Finisterre
Role Airliner
Manufacturer Fairey 
First flight 17th December 1952
Introduced 8th November  1954 with SABENA

Fairey Aviation's research into delta wing aircraft led them to develop a delta wing airliner.  The Finisterre billed  as "taking you to the end's of the earth could carry 72 passengers. Fairey also had an eye on the military market  and the Finisterre could carry  68 troops, 54 paratroops, 48 stretcher case.  It would be able to carry nearly 20 tons  of freight and British Army vehicles would fit into its fuselage. Experience gained in building the Finisterre was later  applied to the company's Rotodyne with which it shared several features.  Following design problems with the original engines Napier Nomads it was equipped with 4 x Bristol Olympus.

Given Fairey's close connections tot he Belgium government SABENA was a natural customer and along with BOAC was one of the first airlines to buy the Finisterre

The Finisterre was developed for RAF use into the Fairey Cormorant. The Cormorant inherited the name Shagbat from the Supermarine Walrus once aircrew realised the connection between Cormorants and Shags. This connection earned it several other names most of which were unrepeatable in polite company 






Offline Green Dragon

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Re: Finished Builds: Models
« Reply #41 on: June 12, 2011, 02:55:51 pm »
Think I've missed the deadline (had big trouble uploding to Photobucket  :banghead: ) but here is my Dornier Do355 all-weather jet fighter from 1946. In October 1944 Hitler was successfully assassinated when he cut open an exploding Knockwurst Sausage which he thought contained the world famous painting of The Fallen Madona With The Big Boobies. The war ended early with Germany becoming a member of NATO in 1945 which was founded late in 1945 when the Soviet Union started getting belligerant. The Do355 has two HeS 011 engines and is armed with two fuselage mounted 30mm MK108 Cannon, two wing mounted 55mm MK212 Cannon and two under wing hardpoints for X-4 missiles or WGR-21 rockets.











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