Author Topic: Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread - AFDS F-100D's  (Read 1151825 times)

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Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread - Dassault Mirage 5Y (Yugoslav Air Force)
« Reply #660 on: October 01, 2011, 12:49:59 am »
Dassault Mirage 5Y - "The Lions", 123 Fighter Aviation Squadron, Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Yugoslav Air Force, 1977







This is the stock French Camo scheme from the Mirage 5F (with a bit of overspray on the fin leading edge) and with 123 Fighter Aviation Squadron markings including a fictional 'nosebar' marking but based on their Lions insignia.

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« Reply #661 on: October 01, 2011, 07:26:38 am »
Republic F-91G Thunderceptor - JG 74 Mölders, West German Luftwaffe, 1956

The first flight of the Republic XF-91 on May 9th, 1949 did not attract that much interest in the non-aviation world where the main news item was the previous day's approval of the West German Constitution but the detonation of the Soviet Union's first atomic weapon in August 1949 made the development and deployment of a fast, high altitude, point-defence interceptor an urgent priority. By October the XF-91 'Thunderceptor' had been fitted with four Reaction Motors XLR11 rocket engines giving the aircraft an outstanding rate of climb and high-altitude performance albeit at the expense of range. The Korean War starting in June 1950 then added to the urgency of the programme and soon production F-91A's started pouring off the Farmingdale production line for an eager USAF and NATO air forces.

When West Germany joined NATO in 1955 the F-84F Thunderstreak became it's principal tactical fighter with the F-91G Thunderceptor becoming it's standard interceptor-fighter entering service with JG74 'Mölders' serving until 1962 when they were gradually replaced by the Saunders-Roe SR.177 (another mixed-power interceptor) . West German Thunderceptors were unique in being armed with the large indigenous 'Speer' infra-red homing missile which was the largest heat-seeking missile until the Soviet 'Anab' entered service in 1961.

















The 'Speer' is actually the AS.30 air-to-surface missile and it's data has been edited to give it the heat-seeking characteristics of the Aim-9B Sidewinder but with longer range and larger warhead more typical of the Aim-7D Sparrow.

« Last Edit: October 01, 2011, 08:02:33 am by SPINNERS »

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« Reply #662 on: October 08, 2011, 08:27:20 am »
Ling-Temco-Vought F-8EJ Crusader - 302nd Hikotai, Japan Air Self-Defense Forces, 1971









Some computer problems have plagued me this week eventually requiring a re-install of W7 (and some data loss sob sob) and it's taken a few evenings to sort out. Anyway, the latest in Third Wire's DLC range was released this week and it's the F-8E(FN) of the French Aéronavale complete with the standard USN scheme plus the overall grey and overall 'bleu' seen here. I've done JASDF Crusader's before but not it this new scheme.

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« Reply #663 on: October 09, 2011, 11:18:01 am »
BAC Skylark FG.3 - No.41 Squadron, RAF South East Asia Command, 1976











The recent 'Kiwi' Skyhawk comes with no less than four different skins and this one really is a cracker! It really does cry out for SEAC markings! Afficionadoes of the Lightning will note some familiar serial numbers.

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« Reply #664 on: October 10, 2011, 02:37:43 pm »
Dassault Super Mystére - No.2 Squadron, Belgian Air Force, 1966









« Last Edit: October 10, 2011, 02:40:08 pm by SPINNERS »

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« Reply #665 on: October 11, 2011, 11:30:25 am »
Dassault Super Mystére - Belgian Air Force, 1963







Couldn't resist the same markings on the early IDF camo (but with white Hunter F.6 codes). It's not a very appropriate camo but perhaps Belgium had sent Super Mystéres in support of UN forces in some 60's hotspot

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« Reply #666 on: October 13, 2011, 10:04:16 am »
Dassault Super Mystére B3 - No.2 Squadron, Royal Dhimari Air Force, 1971

With the realisation that the future lay with his outstanding Mirage family of aircraft Marcel Dassault quickly lost interest in his earlier creations but was persuaded to offer a new 'attack' version of the Super Mystére for export. The Super Mystére B3 was powered by a Rolls-Royce Avon 200 series turbojet rated at 10,000lbs dry thrust and this engine replaced the thirsty afterburning Atar 101G-2 of the B2 but offered equal thrust and lower fuel consumption. Avionics were still primitive but the B3 introduced additional underwing pylons for bombs, rockets or missiles and the aircraft was a good platform for ground-attack. Dhimar became the first export customer for the B3 ordering 30 aircraft which were delivered in 1961 and the B3 was soon overshadowed by it's more glamorous delta-winged stablemate.











This is the J52 engined version of the Super Mystére used by the Israeli's and given the name of Sa'ar (Tempest).
« Last Edit: October 13, 2011, 10:08:07 am by SPINNERS »

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« Reply #667 on: October 14, 2011, 10:16:36 pm »
Dassault Sirocco FG.4 - No.6 Squadron, RAF 'Operation Granby' 1991









I like the overall shape of the Super Etendard and think a Spey engined version would have made an ideal Hunter replacement in the mid-1960's. I've previously done the SuE as the Dassault Oberon (below).

« Last Edit: October 15, 2011, 05:38:01 am by SPINNERS »

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« Reply #668 on: October 16, 2011, 11:24:49 am »
Blackburn Buccaneer S.2 - No.139 Squadron, RAF Strike Command, 1968

Such was the power and influence of First Sea Lord Earl Mountbatten that when the production order for the Buccaneer S.Mk2 was announced in January 1962 not only was his Royal Navy order for 80 aircraft intact but there was an unexpected RAF order for 100 aircraft as Canberra replacements for RAF Germany. This came as a blow to BAC who, despite no official announcement, knew that this meant the certain end of their outstanding TSR.2 programme although the axe wouldn't fall for another six months after an 'operational review'.

The original Blackburn Aviation team continued with the design, development and production of the Royal Navy version whilst Hawker Siddeley were given full control of the RAF programme and some urgency was injected into the programme with the grounding of the Vickers Valiant in 1964 due to fatigue problems. At the time, the Valiant was an important component to the RAF's contribtion to SACEUR and, in his role as deputy head of Allied Command Europe, the RAF's former Chief of the Air Staff Sir Thomas Pike requested an additional order of 40 Buccaneer S.2's.

Hawker Siddeley worked flat out on the RAF Buccaneer programme and soon 'anti-flash' white Buccaneers were taking to the air with the first two squadrons to re-equip being No.100 and No.139 Squadrons at RAF Wittering who exchanged their Victor B.2's for Buccaneer S.2's in April 1967 in a move prompted by concerns of the Victor's suitability in the low-level strike role, the RAF's preference towards the Vulcan and the need for Victor B.2 airframes for conversion to tankers.













I've seen some 'Senior Service' S.1's in anti-flash white and reckon that early RAF Buccaneers could have had the same scheme.

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« Reply #669 on: October 17, 2011, 01:16:42 pm »
Dassault Super Etendard - Belgian Marine Component, 2003










Now available for download at Combat Ace!
« Last Edit: October 23, 2011, 03:19:09 am by SPINNERS »

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« Reply #670 on: October 19, 2011, 12:15:31 pm »
Vought F-8EB - No.1 'Osprey' Squadron, Belgian Zeemacht, 1979











« Last Edit: October 22, 2011, 06:30:34 am by SPINNERS »

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one note, in the 70's one side of the aircraft said "Belgische Zeemacht", while the other side said "Force Navale Belge"


Flinkin' blip! You lot are worse than the Canadians  ;)








Lo-Viz shark mouth




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« Last Edit: November 05, 2011, 08:12:44 am by SPINNERS »

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« Reply #672 on: October 22, 2011, 09:29:15 am »
McDonnell Douglas F-4EU - Various Units, United States Navy, 1970's

By early 1968 the senior Admirals of the United States Navy saw the failure of the F-111B programme as an opportunity to get the green light for their VFX 'back-up' plan and the cancellation of the F-111B in May 1968 was an important step in their plans. In July 1968 the Naval Air Systems Command issued a Request for Proposals for the Naval Fighter Experimental (VFX) programme calling for a tandem two-seat, twin-engined air-to-air fighter with a maximum speed of Mach 2.2 with an inbuilt M61 Vulcan cannon and a secondary close air support role but the primary focus remained long-range interception using the AIM-54 missile. Bids were received from General Dynamics, Grumman, Ling-Temco-Vought, McDonnell Douglas and North American Rockwell and such was the urgency of this programme that Grumman and McDonnell Douglas were selected as finalists in December 1968 with Grumman expected to be announced as winners shortly afterwards.

However, the incoming Nixon administration had other ideas. Faced with the highest inflation since the Korean War era, the massive costs of the Vietnam War and the Apollo programme the new administration demanded cost savings in all departments and soon the new Secretary of Defense, Melvin R. Laird, had identified the VFX programme as being ripe for pruning and ordered an urgent cost review. McDonnell Douglas knew that their variable-geometry F-4S was unpopular with the Admirals and was likely to require as much test and development time (and associated costs) as Grumman's exciting 'clean sheet of paper' design and decided to offer a lower-cost solution.  With perfect timing, they met senior Defense Department officials in early February 1969 and reminded Laird that the F-4 Phantom II programme was now benefiting from the economies of scale from high production to such an extent that Phantoms were pouring off the production line at barely two-thirds of their 1962 costs. They proposed a new multi-service version of the F-4E called the F-4EU for 'Universal' and suggested that they could meet 80% of the VFX specification at about 40% of the expected cost and Laird found this hard to resist but delayed cancellation of the VFX and associated AIM-54 programmes until July 20th when he knew that the domestic audience would be watching Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin taking a giant leap for mankind and Laird calmly considerded that there was no need to announce the 'new' programme as it was just a new version of an existing design.

McDonnell Douglas quickly undertook the detail design to transform the long-nose cannon-armed F-4E for carrier use and smoothly introduced the F-4EU on the production line where it followed on from the F-4J for the Navy with just the first few F-4EU's retaining the 'hard' unslatted wing. Production machines entered service with VMFA-333 and VF-111 in 1972 and service pilots considered that the inbuilt cannon far outweighed any visibility problems caused by the longer nose and VF-111 put their new mount to good use in February 1973 claiming a Mig-17 kill. F-4EU's served until with the United States Navy until 1989 and the United States Marine Corps until 1991.


VF-111 'Sundowners




VF-84 'Jolly Rogers'



« Last Edit: October 23, 2011, 10:02:48 am by SPINNERS »

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« Reply #673 on: October 25, 2011, 01:47:00 pm »
McDonnell F4H-1 Phantom - VF-84 'Jolly Rogers' 1943

Shades of 'The Final Countdown'









Just a bit of fun, not to be taken too seriously....
« Last Edit: October 25, 2011, 01:55:04 pm by SPINNERS »

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Short B-22C Stirling - 350th BS, 100th BG, United States Army Air Force, ETO 1943







I've recycled (pre-cycled?) the B-22 designation (Douglas, let's be honest, your B-22 wasn't going anywhere) to make a Short Stirling for the USAAF (that'll set relations back a few years). Perhaps the USA decided to keep the B-17's and B-24's for the Pacific and use whatever thet could get their hands on in Europe. Further back in this thread is a much more realistic USAAF Lancaster.


Correction - it was a Lincoln. More pics on Page 29.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2011, 01:09:04 pm by SPINNERS »