What if

Picture Post => Current and Finished Projects => Aircraft => Topic started by: Dizzyfugu on November 08, 2015, 06:35:49 am

Title: Vought A3U 'Sea Scorpion' of USMC VMA-133 'Dragons', 1958 (Lots of pics)
Post by: Dizzyfugu on November 08, 2015, 06:35:49 am
On popular demand (again, for/from nighthunter), and this comes out when I start thinking about a turbo-prop-powered F4U. Something rather ...different.  ;)

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5791/22454062997_b8ffa075c8_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/AdbWDc)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) (https://flic.kr/p/AdbWDc) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5703/22251266123_6ebe2bd4e6_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/zUgycn)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) (https://flic.kr/p/zUgycn) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/637/22684404860_d8c50c0d1d_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/AyxvfC)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) (https://flic.kr/p/AyxvfC) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr



Some background:
The US Marine Corps' lessons learned from the Korean war included the need for a ground attack aircraft with a better performance than the AU-1 Corsair, as well as a higher effectiveness than the jet fighters of the 50ies era.

The AU-1 (re-designated from F4U-6) had been a dedicated U.S. Marines attack variant of the Vought F4U fighter with extra armor to protect the pilot and fuel tank, and the oil coolers relocated inboard to reduce vulnerability to ground fire. The fighter's supercharger had been simplified as the design was intended for low-altitude operation. Extra weapon racks were also fitted.

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/626/22872400045_357fe9892e_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/ARa2EV)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) (https://flic.kr/p/ARa2EV) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5828/22883544111_6864c47c29_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/AS99pZ)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) (https://flic.kr/p/AS99pZ) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


Ready for combat the AU-1 weighed 20% more than a fully loaded F4U-4 and was capable of carrying 8,200 lb of bombs, missiles or drop tanks. The AU-1 had a maximum speed of 238 miles per hour at 9,500 ft, when loaded with 4,600 lb of bombs and a 150-gallon drop-tank. When loaded with eight rockets and two 150-gallon drop-tanks, maximum speed was 298 mph at 19,700 ft. When not carrying external loads, maximum speed was 389 mph at 14,000 ft.

First produced in 1952, the AU-1 had been a useful addition. But it had become clear, by the end of the Korean War, that the age of the piston engine fighter plane was more or less over. Based on this insight and several studies based on the experience since WWII, Vought offered the USMC an improved ground attack aircraft on a private venture basis under the internal project handle V-381. The machine was the result of initial attack aircraft studies and roughly based on the F4U's outlines, and a more conservative alternative to the A2U, a proposed attack derivative of the F7U Cutlass, which never came to fruition.

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/675/22684410980_48468a9469_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/Ayxx59)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) (https://flic.kr/p/Ayxx59) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5807/22249662874_cfd9522423_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/zU8kB9)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) (https://flic.kr/p/zU8kB9) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


The V-381 study incorporated proven elements like the characteristic inverted gull wing, which allowed a short and sturdy landing gear, but it differed considerably in many other details and its internal structure, due to a different engine. The aircraft was to be powered by a T-56 turboprop engine and would fit into a heavier class than the F4U, rather comparable to the US Navy's AD Skyraider but almost as fast as a jet fighter of its time – yet more reliable and rugged for low level operations in direct range of small caliber weapons.

The USMC was immediately interested, while the USN declined the proposal (even though much of the V-381’s insights were re-used in the V-406). Compared with the AU-1, the XA3U featured many detail improvements. One of these distinctive modifications was a new cockpit with a bubble canopy. Thanks to the different internal layout of the aircraft the cockpit could be moved forward by about 3', eliminating the abysmal field of view from the F4U's cockpit on the ground and during deck landings. Another significant change was a cruciform tail. This new arrangement had become necessary in order to avoid damage and turbulences from the hot turboprop efflux - the latter's exhaust was bifurcated and placed in the fuselage flanks, slightly deflected downwards and right at the wings' trailing edge, where the residual thrust from the engine helped during liftoff. The characteristic tail arrangement also became the source of the aircraft's official name, the 'Sea Scorpion'.

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/743/22249651344_fb7f2c1f7f_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/zU8hbm)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) (https://flic.kr/p/zU8hbm) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/602/22684398040_dbfe3a1d35_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/Ayxte3)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) (https://flic.kr/p/Ayxte3) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


Armament consisted of four 0.79 in (20 mm) M2 cannon with 250 RPG in the wings, plus a total of fifteen hardpoints under fuselage and wings for a wide range of ordnance and a total weight of 8,000 lb (3,600 kg). The landing gear retracted backwards into the wings, rotating 90°, and the tail wheel with an attached arrester hook was fully retractable, too. The T-56 turboprop with 4.050 hp (2.977 kW) replaced the R-2800 radial and its complex compressor installment, driving a four-blade Hamilton propeller on the XA2U.

In June 1954 the first XA3U prototype made its maiden flight. Initial flights tests showed a very good performance at low and medium altitude, but directional stability was rather poor and the fin area had to be enlarged, resulting in the X3AU-1. Another new feature became a reversible six blade propeller of smaller diameter, which would improve reaction time to throttle input. In this guise, the A3U-1 entered series production and USMC service in early 1956, just in time to take the place of the AU-1 which was phased out in 1957.
But, by that time, the technical development had already rendered the A3U at least questionable, if not obsolete, so only a single batch of 45 aircraft was ordered and eventually built. Types like the North American FJ-4 Fury or the Douglas A4D Skyhawk offered a better performance as well as a nuclear strike capability that the A3U lacked, even though the turboprop aircraft was popular because of its ruggedness and good low altitude handling.

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5787/22872414025_66687cb622_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/ARa6PX)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) (https://flic.kr/p/ARa6PX) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5648/22883553291_7530bd30c2_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/AS9c9g)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) (https://flic.kr/p/AS9c9g) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


With its sophisticated design the A3U served well in its intended shipborne CAS role. In 1958 the machines were upgraded to carry AGM-12 Bullpup missiles, becoming subsequently designated A3U-2. Up to four missiles could be carried under the wings, plus a guidance pod that was carried on one of the outermost wing hardpoints.

The A3Us were deployed during several occasions, including Cuba from 1959 to 1960 to protect Americans during the Cuban Revolution, Thailand in May-July 1962 to support the government's struggles against Communists as well as Operation Power Pack in 1965 in Haiti to prevent a second Communist nation on America's doorstep. Anyway, no A3U actually fired in anger, their main task had rather been sabre-rattling and representing the USMC with dramatic weapon loads at low altitude. Since ever more potent aircraft entered the USMC, like the F-4 Phantom II, the Sea Scorpion's career ended already in 1968 – and despite its usefulness in the theatre of operations, the A2U was not deployed to Vietnam

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/752/22883563371_c96b451421_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/AS9f94)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) (https://flic.kr/p/AS9f94) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/729/22251255723_3374e1b88a_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/zUgv74)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) (https://flic.kr/p/zUgv74) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr
.



General characteristics:
    Crew: 1 pilot
    Length: 33 ft 8 in (10.2 m)
    Wingspan: 41 ft 0 in (12.5 m)
    Wingspan, folded: 17 ft 0.5 in (5.2 m)
    Height: 14 ft 9 in (4.50 m)
    Empty weight: 11,968 lb (5,429 kg)
    Loaded weight: 18,106 lb (8,213 kg)
    Max. takeoff weight: 25,000 lb (11,340 kg)

Powerplant:
    1× Allison T-56-A-6 turboprop engine, rated at 4.050 hp (2.977 kW)
    plus approximately 750 lbs of thrust from the exhaust

Performance:
    Maximum speed: 446 mph (717 km/h) at 26.200 ft (using emergency power)
    Stall speed: 89 mph (143 km/h) clean
    Range: 1,316 mi (1,144 nmi, 2,115 km) on internal fuel
    Service ceiling: 41,500ft (12,649 m)
    Rate of climb: 3,870ft/min (19.7 m/s) at sea-level

Armament:
    4 × 0.79 in (20 mm) M2 cannon with 250 RPG in the wings
    15 hardpoints for a total of up to 8,000 lb (3,600 kg) of ordnance, including bombs,
    torpedoes, mine dispensers, unguided rockets, and gun pods



The kit and its assembly:
Well, this Frankenstein creation was actually spawned by the rather simple idea of a turboprop-powered F4U, following a discussion at whatifmodelers.com concerning my “Turbo Fury” conversion and the potential of T-56 engine nacelles from a C-130 on other aircraft. After three Turbo Furies I still had a final T-56 resin nacelle left in the stash (from OzMods), and eventually tackled this project with the idea of an AU-1 replacement for the USMC in the mid Fifties.

Anyway, with such a modernized version in mind, new ideas popped up – e.g. square wing tips. When I found a pair of leftover outer wings from a Matchbox A3D Skyknight (and they matched up well in shape and size, even the wing profile!) things unfolded into something … different.

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5800/22454129597_a368c7b063_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/Adchrt)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) - WiP (https://flic.kr/p/Adchrt) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5695/22480319229_f1f52fae4c_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/AfvvGR)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) - WiP (https://flic.kr/p/AfvvGR) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


The basis for this project was an Italeri F4U-5 from 1994 (a very nice kit!), even though in the later Revell re-boxing. The Skyknight wings replaced the F4U’s outer wings and added about 1” total wingspan to the kit. In order to compensate for this, I thought about moving the tail fin further back, but eventually implanted a completely new and slightly longer tail section from an A.W. Meteor night fighter (also Matchbox), because it perfectly extends the F4U’s fuselage lines! Consequently, the original tail wheel well had to be closed and moved backwards.

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/585/22454140758_a488d13867_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/AdckKU)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) - WiP (https://flic.kr/p/AdckKU) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5633/22480309219_81b75607ed_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/AfvsJg)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) - WiP (https://flic.kr/p/AfvsJg) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


Another idea was to move the cockpit forward and lower the rear fuselage, for a more up-to-date bubble canopy. The OOB cockpit from the F4U was kept but placed under a new opening – more or less located where the F4U’s main fuselage tank would have been. The ejection seat is new, too, and the canopy comes from a vintage NOVO Supermarine Attacker. The whole spine was cut away and re-sculpted with putty, as well as the fuselage section around the canopy.

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5637/22454106187_2cdfa671a9_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/AdcatR)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) - WiP (https://flic.kr/p/AdcatR) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/660/22454109057_54b1117500_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/Adcbkk)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) - WiP (https://flic.kr/p/Adcbkk) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


For the new resin T-56, the front end of the fuselage was cut away and lots of putty and sculpting created a new transition between the narrower Herc engine with its oval diameter and the round F4U fuselage.
The spinner comes from the OzMod engine set, but the propeller blades were scratched: these once belonged to a vintage Airfix D.H. Mosquito kit. The rather massive, single blades were cut off, their originally round tips squared and then glued onto the resin spinner. A metal axis and a styrene adapter inside of the resin engine were added as adapters, allowing a free spin.

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5716/22480316569_aace59cf25_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/AfvuUZ)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) - WiP (https://flic.kr/p/AfvuUZ) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


Once the fuselage and the wings were mated, the horizontal stabilizers had to be added. The F4U parts could not be used because of their round tips, and they had become just too small for the bigger airframe. Implants had to be used once more, and in this case the stabilizers are the outer wing sections from a heavily rivet-infected 1:100 Breguet Alize from Heller. Odd, but they had just the right shape and chord length for the new position.

After these had been fitted, the fin turned out to be too small for the new and overall bigger aircraft. Finding a solution was not easy, and I eventually added a new fin tip, a part from a Revell (FROG) P-39 stabilizer, maybe 30 years old!

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/678/22846470546_191723f3fc_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/ANS8JA)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) - WiP (https://flic.kr/p/ANS8JA) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


In order to make the intended CAS role believable a LOT of hardpoints were added, all taken from an old Airfix/Heller A-1E Skyraider. The ordnance is an iron bomb mix, IIRC these come from a Monogram A-10 and a Matchbox A-7D.

Anyway, building this monstrosity was massive kitbashing work, and the whole thing evolved rather gradually: What started as a simple engine swap and maybe some cosmetic surgery ended up in multiple body transplants and a bigger aircraft than originally envisaged, kind of a ‘Skyraider 2.0’.

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5735/22454098467_cece90d99e_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/Adc8bK)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) - WiP (https://flic.kr/p/Adc8bK) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


Painting and markings:
Nothing truly fancy, rather the standard USN high-viz livery with Light Gull Grey (FS 36440, Modelmaster enamel) upper surfaces and white undersides and rudders. Compared to the USN, the USMC machines would be rather timid and less flamboyant concerning marking colors, so I only added a little red trim to the fin and around the cockpit. The landing gear and the respective wells were kept in white, like the undersides, with bright red trim around the edges, and the cockpit is Zinc Chromate Green.

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/675/22872451565_953ac02f10_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/ARahZc)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) - WiP (https://flic.kr/p/ARahZc) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5831/22684445890_4c979affee_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/AyxHs3)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) - WiP (https://flic.kr/p/AyxHs3) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/586/22872439525_d8d183ce84_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/ARaepB)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) - WiP (https://flic.kr/p/ARaepB) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


The decals were puzzled together from the scrap box. Since almost and surface details was lost due to the massive bodywork on fuselage and wings, I painted some panel lines with a pencil and emphasized them with lighter, dry-brushed panel shadings. The effect, at least from some distance, turned out much better than expected! Additionally, some wear and dirt was simulated through a light black in wash. Soot stains, esp. around the jet exhausts, were created with grinded graphite, and some dry painting with silver was done on the leading edges. Finally, everything was sealed under a coat of matt acrylic varnish.

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5680/22684435310_d74bd0b9dc_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/AyxEiC)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) - WiP (https://flic.kr/p/AyxEiC) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr



And a final overview:

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5622/22454076677_35bd19551e_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/Adc1H4)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) (https://flic.kr/p/Adc1H4) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5757/22846436616_ac82878fc7_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/ANRXDA)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) (https://flic.kr/p/ANRXDA) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/592/22454097858_82e4d59783_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/Adc81f)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) (https://flic.kr/p/Adc81f) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/775/22480266269_e1b1a73e4a_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/AfveXK)1:72 Vought A3U-2 "Sea Scorpion", aircraft '(ME) 197/BuNo 143556' of VMA-133 ‘Dragons’, U.S. Marine Corps (Marine Aircraft Group 42, 4th Marine Aircraft Wing), based at NAS Alameda, summer 1958 (Whif/Kitbashing) (https://flic.kr/p/AfveXK) by dizzyfugu (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr



Well, what was to simply become a turboprop-powered F4U turned into something …different. The A3U looks exotic, but not bad or implausible – the thing reminds me of the offspring between a Ju 87 dive bomber and a Westland Whirlwind fighter, and there’s some Fairey Firefly an Il-2 single-seater lineage to it, too? As a positive aspect, this kitbash model reminds IMHO at first glance only remotely of the F4U that it once was, so I think the whiffing work is quite effective. :D
Title: Re: Vought A3U 'Sea Scorpion' of USMC VMA-133 'Dragons', 1958 (Lots of pics)
Post by: nighthunter on November 08, 2015, 08:12:27 am
Looks great, and it wasn't my idea, lol! Mine was the turboprop P-47, lol!
Title: Re: Vought A3U 'Sea Scorpion' of USMC VMA-133 'Dragons', 1958 (Lots of pics)
Post by: Dizzyfugu on November 08, 2015, 08:23:33 am
But that's where the inspritaion comes from. The idea of a late P-47 with a T-56 is not dead, though...  ;)
Title: Re: Vought A3U 'Sea Scorpion' of USMC VMA-133 'Dragons', 1958 (Lots of pics)
Post by: kerick on November 08, 2015, 08:27:03 am
Awesome work, what ever the inspiration! My kind of whiff!
Title: Re: Vought A3U 'Sea Scorpion' of USMC VMA-133 'Dragons', 1958 (Lots of pics)
Post by: Dizzyfugu on November 08, 2015, 08:30:07 am
Thank you very much. This is one of the builds that gradually evolve - I am surprised by the result, and how good this thing actually looks.  :blink:
Title: Re: Vought A3U 'Sea Scorpion' of USMC VMA-133 'Dragons', 1958 (Lots of pics)
Post by: sandiego89 on November 08, 2015, 09:18:06 am
Really great.  :thumbsup: Some napalm and LAU pods would look the business as well! 
Title: Re: Vought A3U 'Sea Scorpion' of USMC VMA-133 'Dragons', 1958 (Lots of pics)
Post by: van883 on November 08, 2015, 09:58:27 am
Great stuff!
Title: Re: Vought A3U 'Sea Scorpion' of USMC VMA-133 'Dragons', 1958 (Lots of pics)
Post by: zenrat on November 09, 2015, 01:27:26 am
Very good.
 :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Vought A3U 'Sea Scorpion' of USMC VMA-133 'Dragons', 1958 (Lots of pics)
Post by: Cobra on November 09, 2015, 02:15:10 am
This is a Superb Build :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup: Hope it Gets Considered for a Whiffie! Hope to see More Superb Work from You :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers:  Dan
Title: Re: Vought A3U 'Sea Scorpion' of USMC VMA-133 'Dragons', 1958 (Lots of pics)
Post by: Dizzyfugu on November 09, 2015, 03:22:56 am
Oh, thank you very much, again!  :bow:
Title: Re: Vought A3U 'Sea Scorpion' of USMC VMA-133 'Dragons', 1958 (Lots of pics)
Post by: Captain Canada on November 09, 2015, 09:05:25 am
That is so cool ! Love to see the in-progress shots of these builds...most excellent ! love the pics as always, especially the last deck shots. What a nbeat looking machine !

 :cheers:
Title: Re: Vought A3U 'Sea Scorpion' of USMC VMA-133 'Dragons', 1958 (Lots of pics)
Post by: Tophe on November 09, 2015, 10:10:01 am
Amazing mix! :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Vought A3U 'Sea Scorpion' of USMC VMA-133 'Dragons', 1958 (Lots of pics)
Post by: tc2324 on November 09, 2015, 01:38:09 pm
Hope it Gets Considered for a Whiffie!  Dan

It has and you can always nominate it yourself Dan.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Vought A3U 'Sea Scorpion' of USMC VMA-133 'Dragons', 1958 (Lots of pics)
Post by: tigercat on November 09, 2015, 02:32:10 pm
It's the love child  of a stuka and a Skyraider :)
Title: Re: Vought A3U 'Sea Scorpion' of USMC VMA-133 'Dragons', 1958 (Lots of pics)
Post by: DogfighterZen on November 09, 2015, 04:52:53 pm
It's the love child  of a stuka and a Skyraider :)

Good mix of genes...  ;D :thumbsup:

Dizzy, as always, excellent idea and work!  :bow:

 :cheers:
Title: Re: Vought A3U 'Sea Scorpion' of USMC VMA-133 'Dragons', 1958 (Lots of pics)
Post by: Dizzyfugu on November 09, 2015, 11:36:00 pm
Hope it Gets Considered for a Whiffie!  Dan

It has and you can always nominate it yourself Dan.  :thumbsup:

Oh, thanks a lot!  :bow: :cheers:
Title: Re: Vought A3U 'Sea Scorpion' of USMC VMA-133 'Dragons', 1958 (Lots of pics)
Post by: Army of One on November 10, 2015, 01:22:59 am
Oh wow......what an awesome kitbash......!! I have an engine set from Heritage models for a Herc.......def some food for thought. I think your idea on the panel lines works really well......fantastic finish....... :bow: