What if

Picture Post => Current and Finished Projects => Aircraft => Topic started by: Dizzyfugu on December 29, 2013, 02:14:22 am

Title: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: Dizzyfugu on December 29, 2013, 02:14:22 am
Double post with an Asiarama entry for this one - the (finally) last one for 2013  ;)

http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,38187.0.html


(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7447/11591342446_1fd547c295_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11591342446/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11591342446/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


Some background:
In early 1968, the Soviet Ministry of Defense decided to develop a specialized shturmovik armored assault aircraft in order to provide close air support for the Soviet Ground Forces. The idea of creating a ground-support aircraft came about after analyzing the experience of shturmovaya (ground attack) aviation during World War II, and in local wars during the 1950s and 1960s. The Soviet fighter-bombers in service or under development at this time (Su-7, Su-17, MiG-21 and MiG-23) did not meet the requirements for close air support of the army. They lacked essential armor plating to protect the pilot and vital equipment from ground fire and missile hits, and their high flight speeds made it difficult for the pilot to maintain visual contact with a target. Ordnance load and loiter time were also insufficient.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7387/11591342056_58814c24ba_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11591342056/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11591342056/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3764/11591341856_c3776f5e57_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11591341856/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11591341856/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


In March 1969, a competition was announced by the Soviet Air Force that called for designs for a new battlefield close-support aircraft. Participants in the competition were the Design Bureaus of Sukhoi, Yakovlev, Ilyushin and Mikoyan. The original request was for a simple, relavtively light aircraft, that was easy to produce and maintain and would allow a high survivabilty in a combat environment.

The aircraft was to be powered by two Ivchenko AI-25T non-afterburning turbofans, each with a thrust of 1.750 kgp (3.860 lbst) - a modification of the AI-25 developed for the Yak-40 feederliner, and the same engine that powered the Czech-built L-39 Albatros trainer. The aircraft was to carry an internal cannon and was only intended to carry unguided weapons - bombs of up to 500 kg caliber and rockets/rocket pods.Sighting was to be simple, consisting of a collimating gunsight and a laser rangefinder.
Normal combat payload was to be 1.500 kg (3.310 lb), increasing to 2.500 kg (5.511 lb) in overload configuration. Normal TOW would be 8.200 kg (18.080 lb) and MTOW in the 10.000 kg (22.050 lb) range.

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3694/11590190463_28279d3d33_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11590190463/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11590190463/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3773/11590190233_77ee004d1a_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11590190233/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11590190233/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


All OKBs made submissions, but in the course of the proposals the requirements were widened, eventually necessitating a bigger, more capable aircraft. This eventually led to the Ilyushin’s Il-42 (later renamed into Il-102) and Sukhoi’s T-8 (the later Su-25), which remained in the official competition and the Su-25 would, aftre a long development phase, turn out to be the winner.

OKB Yakovlev had been late with its submission, which was still based on the original requirement. it was clear that their aircraft, internally known as the Yak-35, would neither meet the more demanding profile, nor offer the development potential for a heavier type. Anyway, OKB Yakovlev kept the development going, as a lot of export potential was expected.

(http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5498/11591341846_2958466b36_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11591341846/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11591341846/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


Until May 1970 a total of three prototypes were built and successfully tested. The Yak-35 was a compact aircraft with clean lines, and it took the experience from the recently built (but rejected) Yak-30/32 trainer (NATO code "Magnum/Mantis") further. The modern design featured shoulder-mounted, slightly swept wings and a swept cruciform tail. The AI-25T engines were buried side by side in the rear fuselage, fed by lateral air intakes. The pilot sat in an armored cockpit that would withstand 0.5" caliber fire, and the slanted nose offered good for- and downward view. The aircraft reminded vaguely of the Saab 105 trainer or Sukhoi's initial, light T-8 design.

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3712/11590189743_e44cbcebe0_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11590189743/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11590189743/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


The rugged landing gear with single low pressure tires retracted into the fuselage. Armement compriseda pair of 30mm Nudelman-Richter NR-30 cannons with 100RPG, mounted under the air intakes, and a total of seven hardpoints (three under each wing, one under the fuselage) for ordnance. The inner pair of pylons was "wet" and could carry PTB-600 drop tanks, the fuselage hardpoint was intended for extre equipment like a reconnaissance pod, an ECM jammer or (in later versions, see below) guidance pods for air to ground missiles. For self-defence, IR-guided missiles like the R-3S, R-13M and later the R-60 could be carried on the outer pylons.

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3694/11590978486_85e7350611_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11590978486/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11590978486/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5531/11590978476_54fdb291c3_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11590978476/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11590978476/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


Avionics included a passive SPO-10 Sirena 3M RHAWS, coupled with a set of KDS-23 chaff/flare dispensers at the rear base of the fin, and an active SPS-141 Siren jammer. A Fon laser rangefinder was fitted into the nose tip, coupled with an S-17VG-1sighting mechanism, a DISS-7 doppler speed and drift measurement unit and a PKB-3 sight for toss bombing, an ASP-17B gunsight, an RV-5R radar altimeter and a V-144 computer.

Western officials first became aware of the new type during the October Parade 1972 in Moscow, when the three initial Yak-35 made a single pass at medium altitude. The unknown type immediately received the NATO code "Fraudster". The prototypes and two static airframes continued the development program at slow pace - no serious problem occured, and the Yak-35 turned out to be a stable and agile weapon platform, receiving positive praise from the test pilots.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7327/11590189723_70c0e54d3d_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11590189723/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11590189723/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5515/11589822445_638d071abe_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11589822445/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11589822445/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


As time went by, things turned into favor of the the Yak-35, which eventually got its chance: As the shturmovaya program around the Su-25 ran into more and more delay, and a new attack aircraft was direly needed - not long ago, tensions with China concerning the disputed Damanskiy and Kirkinskiy Islands on the Ussuri River had caused much alert. Finally, the Yak-35 was ordered into production, while parts of its fuselage design had already been used for the Yak-38 VTOL aircraft for the Soviet Navy.

From 1974 on the Yak-35 was delivered to front line squadrons, in parallel with the VG Su-17 fighter bomber. The service aircraft were updated with Delta-N radio guidance equipment, placed in a fairing in front of the fin, which would allow the Yak-35D ('dorabotanyy' = Updated; NATO code "Fraudster B") to carry radio-guided AGMs like the Kh23 or Kh-25 missiles. The emitter had to be carried in an external pod, though, normally placed under the fuselage. A pair of these missiles could be carried on launch rails on the inner pair of pylons.

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3754/11590978456_28a065a640_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11590978456/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11590978456/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2827/11590978436_926170c388_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11590978436/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11590978436/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


A total of 110 Yak-35Ds were built until 1979, all of them remained in Soviet Air Force Service, and almost exclusively in transbaikalian units. None of them were deployed to Afghanistan, as the rather weak engine powered was deemed unsatisfactory for the 'hot and high' conflict theatre.
From 1982 on the Yak-35Ds were quickly replaced by the then-finally-ready Su-25 and relegated into second line services. Most of the remaining Yak-35Ds were kept in use for weapon training, mostly at flight academies along MiG-21 fighters until 1990, and some served as target tugs with frontline units in the Far East. No specimen was ever exported.


(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7332/11589822205_e8303899eb_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11589822205/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11589822205/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr




General characteristics
Crew: One
Length incl. pitot: 14.54 m (47 ft 7 3/4 in) incl. pitot
Wingspan: 9,52 m (31 ft 2½ in)
Height: 4.6 m (15 ft ½ in)
Empty weight: 6.525 kg (14.375 lb)
Loaded weight: 8.750 kg (19.275 lb)
Max. take-off weight: 11.400 kg (25.110 lb)

Powerplant:
2× Ivchenko AI-25T non-afterburning turbofans, each with a thrust of 1.750 kgp (3.860 lbst)

Performance:
Maximum speed: 1.050 km/h (652 mph/Mach 0.9) at height, clean configuration; 825 km/h (512 mph) with external stores at sea level
Range: 1.450 km (900 mi); high, clean configuration
Ferry range: 2.500 km (1,553 mi)
Service ceiling: 14.000 m (45.850 ft)
Rate of climb: 76 m/s (14.936 ft/min)
Thrust/weight: 0.54

Armament:
2× NR-30 30mm cannons with 100 RPG
7 hardpoints for up to 2.500 kg (5.511 lb) of external ordnance, including rails for 2× IR-guided air-to-air missiles for and a wide variety of general-purpose bombs, cluster bombs, gun pods, rocket pods, drop tanks and radio-guided air-to-surface missiles like the Kh-23 or Kh-25.



The kit and its assembly:
This fantasy thing was spawned by the vague thought that one could turn the rather crude Yak-38 kit from Tsukuda Hobby into "something pretty". The plan had been lingering for some time, and when I got hands on an incomplete Yak-38 (Revell re-boxing of the kit, canopy missing) I eventually started with the surgery, letting inspiration and donation parts flow.

I had a vague idea of what the aircraft should look like, but the overall layout evolved step by step. One initial measure was to shorten the fuselage considerably: plugs from in front of and behind the original wings were cut out, and the remaining three fuselage pieces glued together. As the fuselage has an almost even diameter and shape all along its length, this turned out to be pretty easy, but still needed considerably putty work.

The original fittings for the wings and tail surfaces were then filled with styrene plugs and sanded even.

Moving the wings from their original mid-position to the shoulders was already something I had in mind before the project started. But the eventual solution just evolved as I had the fuselage ready and could judge positions and proportions.

The wings I used come from a Alpha Jet (Heller), and they were not simply stuck to the fuselage. Due to the curved back of the Yak-38 I had to add a kind of console, made from the upper wing's mid section of a Matchbox SBC Helldiver biplane (!). This connector piece was placed into a carved fairing on top of the fuselage, the new wings attached to it, and the missing bodywork sculpted with 2C putty. This way I was able to blend the new arrangement into the rest of the body with matching wing roots, without having it look as if the wings had simple been stuck onto it. The result is pretty good, looks rather organic.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7435/11588891894_e6aaac5631_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11588891894/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) - WiP (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11588891894/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


The tail is new, too. Original plan had been to use the Yak-38 tail, maybe with a T-tail arrangement - but that simply did not look good. Finding a replacement was tough, I finally settled on an A-4M (Italeri) fin, which had to be modified with a clipped top, Yak-38 style, in order NOT to remind too much of the Douglas creation! It fits in shape and size, though.

New stabilizers had to be used, too - the original Yak-38 looked much too small and flimsy. A T-tail was not possible anymore, so I used a cruciform tail, A-4 style, even though the stabilizers had to be moved upwards since the Yak-38 tail is much wider than an A-4. The stabilizers themselves are new, too: a pair of F-86 fins(!), leftover from Hobby Boss kits. They are a bit thick, but look great and blend well into the whole arrangement.

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3709/11588976083_392a8dfc9a_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11588976083/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) - WiP (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11588976083/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


The main landing gear was taken OOB, but with new wheels and extra struts fitted. The front wheel is totally new, it belongs to a Fiat G-91. The cockpit received a new seat (from a MiG-29), a pilot figure and a primitive dashboard, and a donation canopy had to be found and integrated (I think it comes from a Tamiya 1:100 F-105).
All around the hull small details were added, including the seven pylons and the rocket pod ordnance.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7371/11589825463_40e24195e5_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11589825463/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) - WiP (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11589825463/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


Painting and markings:
It took a while and some research to turn up a suitable, tactical paint scheme. Normally I keep whifs rather subtle, and I did not want to paint the Yak-35 in a dark green/brown scheme, typical for Eastern Europe aircraft.
Afghanistan was a vague idea, a desert/mountainous scheme, as well as the Su-25 prototype which appreared at Le Bourget ("301 Blue"), with its two-tone brown livery and a few green accents.

I finally found a Su-7UM trainer in a light, three-tone camouflage which I transplanted on my Yak-35. It consists of two sand tones (Humbrol 187 and 63) and a green tone (Humbrol 155). Looks rather surreal! The undersides are kept in Russian Blue (Humbrol 115).

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7422/11590236686_09f95c8e0a_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11590236686/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) - WiP (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11590236686/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


Since much of the fuselage consists of pure putty and re-engraving would be rather hazardous I painted panel lines, with a mix of sepia ink and acrylic matt varnish. A second-best solution, but the result is O.K., when you do not take a closer look...

The whole thing received a light wash with black ink in order to emphasize panel line and details and the leading edges were lightly dry-brushed with pale grey. Basic colors were also ‘tamed down’ trough dry painting with shades of light beige and grey, for a worn and bleached look.

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3693/11589825493_f4260f46ca_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11589825493/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) - WiP (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11589825493/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


Cockpit interior was painted in typical, Soviet "anti fatigue" turquoise, the landing gear was painted in a mix of Aluminum and Olive Drab. Di-electric panels were painted in a bright green, a mix of Humbrol 2 and 175.

Most markings come from the scrap box, insignia and tactical code come from a Carpena Decals 1:72 MiG17 aftermarket sheet.

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3834/11589822185_fb647a473d_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11589822185/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11589822185/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5517/11589821725_72efa72a14_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11589821725/)
1:72 Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO Code ‘Fraudster B’); aircraft '17 Red' of 26th GvAPIB, Soviet Air Force; Desyatyy Oochastok AB (USSR, Manchurian region), 1976 (Whif/Kit bashing) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11589821725/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr




This thing was a major surgical act, but turned out nicely. With an arrestor hook this could also have become a maritime fighter bomber, e. g. an alternative to the French Dassault Ètendard or the Jaguar M? It looks familiar, has some serious Su-25 appeal, yet the thing looks unique. And the desert/mountain style paint scheme suits the aircraft well.

Finally, a look behind the scenes - typical poster backgorund arrangement with a self-made model kit holder  ;D

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7410/11589825503_65d59fd42b_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11589825503/)
Look behind the scenes (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/11589825503/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr
Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: Cobra on December 29, 2013, 02:34:23 am
Superb Job,Dizzy :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup: This looks like it would be Featured in an Episode of Thunderbirds,Captain Scarlet,or Joe 90! You Did Awesome in Building,Painting,and Decaling such an Aircraft :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: Dan
Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: Weaver on December 29, 2013, 03:09:22 am
That looks great, and as ever, very credible too - nice one!  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: comrade harps on December 29, 2013, 04:54:51 am
Oh, that is nice.

Love the faded colours.
Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: Captain Canada on December 29, 2013, 05:06:42 am
I really like the likes in this one. In some ways it looks sleek and and others more brawny....perfect mix ! I noticed the Skyhawk tail but was wondering about he rest of it. Now we know !

Great selection of photos as well.

Cheers !
Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: James on December 29, 2013, 05:07:54 am
Nice one! Looks superb. :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 29, 2013, 06:41:55 am
Great little build!  Wonderful job!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: nighthunter on December 29, 2013, 08:28:40 am
Looks great Dizzy! Almost had me fooled as it looked very similar to the 38, but knowing you, there had to be some extreme model mods hidden under all that paint!
Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: Dizzyfugu on December 29, 2013, 10:40:48 am
Thank you very much! Glad you like it. The Yak-35 turned out to be very balanced for a kitbash, its proportions are great and when all was done I had so many idea what this could have become, too. Chinese, perhaps...?  :party:

The paint finish is not good, though, it looks better on the pics than in reality...  :rolleyes:
Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: PR19_Kit on December 29, 2013, 10:48:28 am
Outstanding idea and execution Thomas, it really looks the part.  :thumbsup: :bow:

But what do you do with TWO finless Hobbyboss Sabres?  :o
Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: Dizzyfugu on December 29, 2013, 11:07:44 am
It's hard to tell, but the F-86s became these...   :wacko:

(http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6020/6003157954_27fd5bbd81_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/6003157954/)
1:72 [Inspired by] The Sky Crawlers - Stockum Air Force "Fafnir Ausf. B" turboprop fighter (kitbashing/scratch-built) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/6003157954/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7363/9621205412_6e8a58b0f1_z.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/9621205412/)
1:72 Curtiss Model 101 (UFC-1 'Oceanhawk '); former second XFC-1 prototype, VX-4; Point Mugu, summer 1956 (What-if/Kit-bashing) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/dizzyfugu/9621205412/) by dizzyfugu (http://www.flickr.com/people/dizzyfugu/), on Flickr


Both not really recognizable as F-86 conversions, the fins were NOT needed, though.  :party:

Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: PR19_Kit on December 29, 2013, 11:30:39 am
Both not really recognizable as F-86 conversions, the fins were NOT needed, though.  :party:

You can say THAT again!!!  :o
Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: Tophe on December 29, 2013, 09:02:03 pm
Congratulations! :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: rickshaw on December 29, 2013, 10:13:11 pm
Very nice.  Lovely aircraft.   :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: Dizzyfugu on December 30, 2013, 02:35:57 am
Thank you, too!  :cheers:
Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: Dizzyfugu on April 09, 2014, 02:48:04 am
Just an addendum - the Yak-35D just made an appearance in an "Alternative History" forum in the Ukraine...  :party:

http://alternathistory.org.ua/alternativnyi-shturmovik-yak-35d-sssr

The funniest thing is that some "experts" discuss about flawed "English --> Russian" translations that were probably done through an online translator like Google... ROFL!
Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: McColm on April 09, 2014, 10:40:02 am
Great work.
Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: Dizzyfugu on November 10, 2015, 07:07:44 am
I revive this because this whif somehow attracted attention and stirred doubts and discussion:

https://translate.google.de/translate?hl=de&sl=ru&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fsfw.so%2F1149035972-neizvestnyy-shturmovik-yak-35d.html

 ;D
Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: PR19_Kit on November 10, 2015, 08:41:36 am
Hehehe, nice one Thomas.  :thumbsup:

More confusion amongst the JMN masses.
Title: Re: Yakovlev Yak-35D (NATO 'Fraudster B'); 26th GvAPIB, Desyatyy Oochastok AB, 1976
Post by: Army of One on November 10, 2015, 09:13:48 am
Wow......how did i miss this one.......!!!! Love it  :wub: