Author Topic: The last surviving Fw200 Condor  (Read 241 times)

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Offline rickshaw

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The last surviving Fw200 Condor
« on: July 29, 2021, 10:35:16 pm »
The last surviving Fw200 Condor is restored: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZb1TUIfeWo&t=74s
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Offline PR19_Kit

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Re: The last surviving Fw200 Condor
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2021, 12:09:54 am »
That's one SERIOUS restoration!  :thumbsup:
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

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Kit

Offline joncarrfarrelly

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Re: The last surviving Fw200 Condor
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2021, 02:51:05 pm »
All new fuselage and parts of various airframes.


Actually, "Our airplane" figuratively is a kind of "mixed being" when it can be admired again in full
beauty after restoration.

Due to the controlled crash (emergency watered and sunk) of the 0063 in 1942 itself, then the 57
long years in salt water and in addition the regrettable accident during the recovery have contributed
to the fact that a large number of structural parts from the 0063 recovery have simply no longer existed
or have been affected to the extent that they can no longer be restored.

A search for Fw200 "replacement structures" began and promising wreck sites were localized.
Recoveryat the sites have been organized and carried out successfully. It was not only a matter
of time, when and how the rescues are carried out, but also a question of fundamental decisions
and "happy" circumstances, which together were then effective.

The result of all these efforts to search for the "replacement structures":

The fuselage will be completely rebuilt except for the area of the tailplanes.
Individual structural parts for the tailplane come from Fw 200 C-1, plant no. 0002, which was
shot down before Dyrøy in Norway in 1942.
The outer wings come from an Fw 200 C-4, plant no. 0140, which crashed on Mount Kvitanosi
in Norway in 1942.
The cockpit window frame comes from a Fw 200 C-4, factory no. 0163, which crashed into
the Lavangenfjord near Vaernes in Norway in 1944
All four BRAMO 323 R2 engines do not come from the crashed aircraft, but two from a private
collection and one engine from an aviation museum in Madrid. This BRAMO 323-R2 engine was
installed on a Spanish Do 24. With spare parts from MTU and Dachsel Flugmotorreparatur, a
fourth engine can be built up to 80%.

Thus, "Our aircraft" consists of parts of a Fw 200 C-1, a C-3, two C-4, four engines from different
sources and an almost complete fuselage of new construction.


https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&u=https://fw200-restaurierung-bremen.de
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Offline frank2056

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Re: The last surviving Fw200 Condor
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2021, 07:13:21 pm »
They should call it a FW 200T Condor. T for "Theseus"