Author Topic: Army Experiments In Train Derailment & Sabotage - 1944  (Read 274 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline rickshaw

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 11211
How to reduce carbon emissions - Tip #1 - Walk to the Bar for drinks.

Offline scooter

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 6900
Re: Army Experiments In Train Derailment & Sabotage - 1944
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2021, 05:51:32 pm »
Army Experiments In Train Derailment & Sabotage - 1944 - harder than it seems...

Indeed.  And ya gotta kinda feel for the Army track crews who have got out and fix the rails just for the OSS to blow them out the next day.
The F-106- 26 December 1956 to 8 August 1988
Gone But Not Forgotten

Quote
Oh are you from Wales ?? Do you know a fella named Jonah ?? He used to live in whales for a while.
— Groucho Marx

My dA page: Scooternjng

Offline Pellson

  • Targeted for assassination by JMNs
  • ****
  • Posts: 850
Re: Army Experiments In Train Derailment & Sabotage - 1944
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2021, 01:15:45 am »
My wife is half Danish, and her maternal grandfather was leading in an underground resistance team employed in sabotage during WW2. They blew up factories involved in the German war effort as well as railroad and other infrastructure. In 1944, Gestapo came too close and he was evacuated to Sweden until the armistice when he promptly returned.

After the war, he rarely spoke of his experiences until very late in life, and then, his main concern was the lives lost, on both sides. In retrospect, I would say he suffered from PTSD, but that wasn’t a recognised diagnosis by then.

I had the opportunity to talk to him about rail sabotage on a few occasions, under the auspice that I at the time was working on the rail. He always emphasised that calculating the charges was a matter of precision rather than amount in getting the desired effect, and that they generally got it right. One interesting fact is that the team without exception stayed behind to make as sure as possible to minimise loss of life by warning bystanders and factory workers before vanishing in the panic. 

Today, his story lives on in the Danish “Frihedsmuséet”, or Museum of Freedom, in Copenhagen, where he, some of his comrades and many other resistance fighters tell their memories in taped interviews. An enormously exciting and at the same time in many ways moving testimony.
My wife and I are repeatedly telling our kids about their great grandfather’s experience, making certain that they understand the value and cost of independence and freedom.  Living in long time neutral Sweden, we find this too often being taken for granted.
Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition!

Offline PR19_Kit

  • Closeted Take That fan
  • What-IF SIG
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 37813
  • Whiffing since the 70s
Re: Army Experiments In Train Derailment & Sabotage - 1944
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2021, 04:49:52 am »
It would have been much more effective if they'd have blown up a chunk of rail on a curve.................
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

Offline rickshaw

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 11211
Re: Army Experiments In Train Derailment & Sabotage - 1944
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2021, 04:55:15 am »
It would have been much more effective if they'd have blown up a chunk of rail on a curve.................

I think their problem really was that they used too little explosive and only removed chunks of rail.  They should have aimed to remove a whole rail.  No jumping over the gap then!  What interested me was how precise the chunks removed were cut, almost as if with a saw... 
How to reduce carbon emissions - Tip #1 - Walk to the Bar for drinks.

Offline tigercat

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2716
Re: Army Experiments In Train Derailment & Sabotage - 1944
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2021, 06:20:08 am »
Very interesting  ;D

Of course when you don't need to be discreet about it

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_plough

Recently learnt some about brave  Danish resistance

http://ftr-wot.blogspot.com/2013/04/improvised-armor-v3-holger-danske.html?m=1
« Last Edit: February 21, 2021, 06:21:41 am by tigercat »

Offline NARSES2

  • Nick was always on his mind - just ask the Pet Shop Boys
  • Global Moderator
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 45227
Re: Army Experiments In Train Derailment & Sabotage - 1944
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2021, 06:43:04 am »

Today, his story lives on in the Danish “Frihedsmuséet”, or Museum of Freedom, in Copenhagen, where he, some of his comrades and many other resistance fighters tell their memories in taped interviews. An enormously exciting and at the same time in many ways moving testimony.
My wife and I are repeatedly telling our kids about their great grandfather’s experience, making certain that they understand the value and cost of independence and freedom.  Living in long time neutral Sweden, we find this too often being taken for granted.

Very brave man, as were all resistance fighters and behind the lines operatives. You get caught there's no Geneva Convention.

Until the 90's I'd always assumed most of the Danish resistance was in a passive form, non co-operation etc . It was only when I went to Denmark for a conference, yes Denmark does, or did as I'm not sure if they are still going, have a steelworks, that I got chatting with one of the attendees in the bar and found out his uncle had been a member of the resistance.
Decals my @r$e!