Humbrol Enamels

Started by Doug K, May 05, 2018, 01:49:21 AM

Previous topic - Next topic

Doug K

Simple question; what on Earth has happened to Humbrol Eamels? I'm quite old school, I still use a hairy stick for my models but even using a pretty good sable, the Matt and satin whites I bought for my Gannet are awful.

It's like spreading a plastic goop, not the paint I know from the (relatively)recent past.

zenrat

I've only bought one Humbrol Enamel in the last 10 years (metalcote gunmetal) and it is horrible.  Sounds like the same problem - it just doesn't brush out.
I suppose I could've tried thinning it but I just put it to one side and used acrylic.
I've also tried Humbrol clears and liquid mask and i'm not impressed with them either.
Fred

- Can't be bothered to do the proper research and get it right.

Another ill conceived, lazily thought out, crudely executed and badly painted piece of half arsed what-if modelling muppetry from zenrat industries.

zenrat industries:  We're everywhere...for your convenience..

NARSES2

I've not bought any Humbrol enamels for years, just their acrylics and with those the pots drive me mad  :banghead: However I find brush painting whites of any make over large areas problematical at best. If I have large area's then I use Halford's Appliance White.
Decals my @r$e!

Old Wombat

I've found if I mix Humbrol paints in the tin, then seal them properly, the bl@@dy stuff "cures" in the tin. I've even bought a tin that had cured before I opened it!

That was only 2 days after I bought it & it was recently acquired stock according to the store owner.

Don't know who's making their paints now but they're becoming extremely marginal as a useful product.
Has a life outside of What-If & wishes it would stop interfering!

"The purpose of all War is Peace" - St. Augustine

veritas ad mortus veritas est

Hobbes

Quote from: zenrat on May 05, 2018, 02:02:21 AM
I've only bought one Humbrol Enamel in the last 10 years (metalcote gunmetal) and it is horrible.  Sounds like the same problem - it just doesn't brush out.
I suppose I could've tried thinning it but I just put it to one side and used acrylic.
I've also tried Humbrol clears and liquid mask and i'm not impressed with them either.

The Metalcote colors are an outlier: they use a very different paint formulation compared to the enamels. I've got some Metalcote from a few years ago, and that works well - but only if you thin it.

Dizzyfugu

Hmm, I have been using the Humbrol Metalcote for years and never had problems. With age, the paints tend to become dry and more viscous, but from my experience they take thinning well - and they need to be fluid for a good finish. A bigger brush with more volume than you'd normally use (e. g. with standard enamels) is also recommended, because the bigger paint reservoir in the brush tip keeps the whole stuff fluid for a longer period. Small brushes tend to simply dry out, esp. when you create larger areas.

zenrat

Quote from: Dizzyfugu on May 05, 2018, 03:14:57 AM
...A bigger brush with more volume than you'd normally use (e. g. with standard enamels) is also recommended, because the bigger paint reservoir in the brush tip keeps the whole stuff fluid for a longer period. Small brushes tend to simply dry out, esp. when you create larger areas.

Good advice but not much use for detail painting car chassis's.

I still have a lot of Humbrol enamels from "before" and they are fine despite being over 30 years old.
Fred

- Can't be bothered to do the proper research and get it right.

Another ill conceived, lazily thought out, crudely executed and badly painted piece of half arsed what-if modelling muppetry from zenrat industries.

zenrat industries:  We're everywhere...for your convenience..

Weaver

Hmmm... :unsure:

I ONLY use Humbrol enamels and I don't have most of these problems, although I have had severe problems with their spray-can varnish in the past (a problem which I believe has now been rectified). I always stir the paint VERY thoroughly. Then I put the paint stirrer on a plastic pallet and ONLY use that as a paint reservoir for the brush: NEVER take paint from the lid or the tin. I occasionally thin it but not often.

I also airbrush it. Again, it seems fine as long as I use ONLY Humbrol thinners (other brands cause problems) and thin it about 2-2.5 parts thinners to 1 part paint. I have a jar-feed single-action airbrush, so it needs quite a lot of air pressure to lift the paint.

It's important to put the lid back on properly. If it's bent, straighten it. If there's dried paint around the sealing surfaces of the tin and/or the lid, clean it off. Press the lid back on as hard and as far as the factory did: I usually put it underneath the bench and then hammer or push on the base of the tin with a lot of force.

Ironically, the only enamel paint I have had consistent problems with is Revell, to the point where I've put all my Revell paints in a separate box and will probably never use them again.

"We thank you, but this diversion is not true. Things never happened thus."

"Oh, but it IS true. Things need not have happened to be true. Tales and dreams are
the shadow-truths that will endure when mere facts are dust and ashes, and forgot."

- Sandman: A Midsummer Night's Dream, by Neil Gaiman

PR19_Kit

Quote from: Weaver on May 05, 2018, 06:46:48 AM

I usually put it underneath the bench and then hammer or push on the base of the tin with a lot of force.


I can't help feeling there's scope for a tale in the 'Things we did in a miss-spent youth' thread here.................  ;D ;)
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

Doug K

Quote from: zenrat on May 05, 2018, 04:23:43 AM
Quote from: Dizzyfugu on May 05, 2018, 03:14:57 AM
...A bigger brush with more volume than you'd normally use (e. g. with standard enamels) is also recommended, because the bigger paint reservoir in the brush tip keeps the whole stuff fluid for a longer period. Small brushes tend to simply dry out, esp. when you create larger areas.

Good advice but not much use for detail painting car chassis's.

I still have a lot of Humbrol enamels from "before" and they are fine despite being over 30 years old.

I'm the same, I have 30 year old tins that are still fine

Doug K

Quote from: Dizzyfugu on May 05, 2018, 03:14:57 AM
Hmm, I have been using the Humbrol Metalcote for years and never had problems. With age, the paints tend to become dry and more viscous, but from my experience they take thinning well - and they need to be fluid for a good finish. A bigger brush with more volume than you'd normally use (e. g. with standard enamels) is also recommended, because the bigger paint reservoir in the brush tip keeps the whole stuff fluid for a longer period. Small brushes tend to simply dry out, esp. when you create larger areas.

Yeah, that has been my method too

Doug K

Quote from: Weaver on May 05, 2018, 06:46:48 AM
Hmmm... :unsure:

I ONLY use Humbrol enamels and I don't have most of these problems, although I have had severe problems with their spray-can varnish in the past (a problem which I believe has now been rectified). I always stir the paint VERY thoroughly. Then I put the paint stirrer on a plastic pallet and ONLY use that as a paint reservoir for the brush: NEVER take paint from the lid or the tin. I occasionally thin it but not often.

I also airbrush it. Again, it seems fine as long as I use ONLY Humbrol thinners (other brands cause problems) and thin it about 2-2.5 parts thinners to 1 part paint. I have a jar-feed single-action airbrush, so it needs quite a lot of air pressure to lift the paint.

It's important to put the lid back on properly. If it's bent, straighten it. If there's dried paint around the sealing surfaces of the tin and/or the lid, clean it off. Press the lid back on as hard and as far as the factory did: I usually put it underneath the bench and then hammer or push on the base of the tin with a lot of force.

Ironically, the only enamel paint I have had consistent problems with is Revell, to the point where I've put all my Revell paints in a separate box and will probably never use them again.

Yeah, I mix thoroughly and only take from the stirrer, the weird thing is that the two whites I'm working with have the same problem, as does the radome tan. If the grey is the same then I'm in trouble.

NARSES2

Quote from: zenrat on May 05, 2018, 04:23:43 AM

I still have a lot of Humbrol enamels from "before" and they are fine despite being over 30 years old.

Me to, including loads of the authentics.

Quote from: Weaver on May 05, 2018, 06:46:48 AM
although I have had severe problems with their spray-can varnish in the past (a problem which I believe has now been rectified).


Have you any farther info on this H ? I've almost become paranoid with their spray varnish
Decals my @r$e!

Doug K

Quote from: NARSES2 on May 06, 2018, 05:54:39 AM
Quote from: zenrat on May 05, 2018, 04:23:43 AM

I still have a lot of Humbrol enamels from "before" and they are fine despite being over 30 years old.

Me to, including loads of the authentics.

Quote from: Weaver on May 05, 2018, 06:46:48 AM
although I have had severe problems with their spray-can varnish in the past (a problem which I believe has now been rectified).


Have you any farther info on this H ? I've almost become paranoid with their spray varnish

A good question, I used it on an Irish Aer Chor Hurricane and it ate the decals, very weird.

kitnut617

I just found out from my LMS that they can no longer get Humbrol enamels into the country --- I was told what is on the shelf is all that you can get.
If I'm not building models, I'm out riding my dirtbike