avatar_McColm

MPC Daytona Transport Truck with photos

Started by McColm, October 15, 2022, 03:06:22 PM

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McColm

#31

The cab now has a daybed which came off the front of the trailer top as I'm having problems fitting it, so it's has been assigned to the spares box.
I'm using 1/72 front nose wheels to the cab tilting forward as a temporary measure, the tyres came from the Austin 1300 model.
There's a couple of Italeri 1/24 Truck Accessories kits which would come in useful for this bodge/build.
Warm soapy water seems to do the trick in clearing the windscreen but I left some bits for the weathered effect.



Overhead view


McColm

#33

The back window has been removed and so has the masking tape. I have found that Lifecolor acrylic paint UA 548 FS 34102 Royal Air Force Light Green 1701 is a very good match for the Tamiya AS-14 Olive Green USAF.











Now the fun part begins, filling in the gaps with truck stuff.

McColm

I think that I have solved the problem with the cab's stability,  by adding a third wheel.

I found another set of wheels, with all the same tyres, the tricycle cab layout seems to work in it's favour.

McColm

Just waiting for the Italeri truck accessories packs to arrive. The rear indicators on the trailer have been removed and the tailgate glued in place.  I'm using scrap pieces of cardboard as templates to fabricate the the third wheel surround and to fill in the gaps.
I can use the plastic from the hardtop but it's a bit too thick for my saw to cut through. I think a mini-hacksaw or a two pin plug for my look-alike Drimmel set as there's a cutting tool attachment.
I can scratch build the trailer legs and start on the Revell Tradewind kit.

McColm

The 1/24 Italeri European and American truck accessories No.706 kits arrived this evening, just a case of sorting out which parts I need. PSR will commence tomorrow and the trainer rear lights added. Strips of masking tape painted matt black ⚫ and the alloy wheels painted green. A raid in the spares for offcuts of thin plastic for the mirror support and aerials.
I know it might even be finished by the end of the month.

McColm

Fuel tanks were fitted and some of the checkered panels have been felted, once again this is not a squared cab chassis. I have fitted a pair of exhaust pipes on either side of the cab fairing.I don't think that this was an actually built in the RW, which means I can put the parts where I like.

McColm

#38
Backstory

Originally intended for the USARMY in the Logistics Corp, to be operated by anyone holding a driver's licence. This mini-truck with its own trailer should have 4x4 drive and have an automatic gearbox.
The Leyland Group gave the go-ahead to SJMcColm Engineering Ltd to develop a working prototype late 1950s to early 1960s. Who produced something quite radical for the time.  The powerplant came from a 4.2 V8 with a five speed automatic gearbox using a paddle-shifting device mounted on the steering wheel. The binnacle was attached to an arm that swivelled as the drivers door opened to give the maximum access to the seat. The engine was mid mounted in-between the driver and passenger seat, a hatch allowed access for maintenance and doubled up a a table with two cup holders. The pedals could be adjusted as the seat didn't move.
The cab had a three wheel layout which allowed a turning circle of 15 feet in one lock,  powersteering and air-conditioning were intended to be fitted as standard with a radio cassette player, electric windows and a electric step. A forward and rear camera to aid parking. All three wheels turning at the same time using MacFerson struts. The trailer was fitted with leaf springs,  which could have a hardtop or canvas top depending on the load. The hinged tailgate acted as a ramp when lowered.
After rigorous trials in the Australian Outback the Leyland Ranger, built in left-hand drive was accepted by the USARMY but on a ten year lease 250 would be built in Canadian Leyland factory and driven across the border to their final destinations.
The popular model featured a daybed in the rear with a fridge and a shelf for a small portable TV.
 The Leyland Ranger was proving very popular in the Racing World, as NASCAR and Indie teams were using them to transport their cars to the track. SJMcColm Engineering Ltd quickly provided the trailer with detachable caravan pods for the drivers which caught on as a camper trailer.
 Back in the UK the British Army also placed an order for 500 with right-hand drive and a few specifications including a sand filter. The 4.2L V8 replaced with a 5L V8 turbo diesel.
The Leyland Ranger would undergo many improvements during its production run eventually being part of SJMcColm Engineering Ltd Truck Division in the early 1970s.
All of the British Army's Leyland Rangers were built at the SJMcColm Engineering Ltd facilities in Park Royal Northwest London who also provided the commercial & private sector when Leyland Canada closed its doors.
 Of the 250 Rangers in service with the USARMY at least 160 were still on the road in 1990 with the Americans buying their original order when the leasing agreement ran out whilst the British Rangers have managed to integrate with the Armed Forces. These have been updated with the Mk.V version, diesel-electric serving in both Gulf Wars and the Desert Ranger for hostile environments.

McColm

More experiments with shapes to fill in the gaps, hidden by Milliput. Left to harden overnight so PSR tomorrow to look more truck-like .

McColm


Rick Lowe

FYI, the original Transporter truck with Dragster payload kit is available again from Round2.

McColm

Quote from: Rick Lowe on December 04, 2022, 11:18:25 PMFYI, the original Transporter truck with Dragster payload kit is available again from Round2.
Thanks  :thumbsup: