avatar_Hobbes

How to work with white metal?

Started by Hobbes, February 22, 2021, 11:51:57 AM

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Hobbes

I've got a white metal kit, which is my first foray into this medium (SMTS Models Jaguar XJC racer in 1/43). The instructions recommend automotive paint; is it possible to use Tamiya fine surface primer?

And what about putty? I've got an automotive putty which should work. Anything special to be aware of?

PR19_Kit

With my white metal car kits I've used standard Halfords Acrylic sprays with no troubles at all. And my standard Presto works fine too, but that IS car filler.

Lucky you with that XJC, they're pretty thin on the ground. Is it the big arched Broadspeed/BL racer?
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

Hobbes

yes, it's the Broadspeed car. I bought it direct from SMTS, and they still list it as available on the website.

Tempted to make up some Lucas, Prince of Darkness decals to go along with the Leyland logo  :wacko:

Mossie

I've made one white metal kit and a few add-ons.  The tools and materials you use for plastic work on white metal.  Epoxy glues work well for a strong bond, super glue if you need more control.  Wet and dry works surprisingly well, as does a craft knife for removing flash.  Normal acrylic paints go on well.

I've noticed that the workability varies considerably between suppliers, the composition of white metal can vary widely.
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Dizzyfugu

#4
White metal is very unproblematic, it's more or less like (soft) resin. Make sure the dsurface is clean/fat-free, and you can use both acrylic and solvent-based paint on it, was well as any putty you'd normally use on a plastic model. Presto (as Kit mentioned) is a solvent-based putty and works very good on it, its dry hardness comes close to white metal. However, white metal can have a wide range of hardness, I'd assume that car body shells are harder/morre brittle than e.g. miniatures or landing gear parts. Superglue is recommended for small parts, but larger sections require IMHO 2C glue.

rickshaw

#5
Many, many, many years ago when I was a young Wargamer, I found in an oversea catalogue a 1/76 model of a Daimler Dingo in white metal.  I purchase it and built it, using solder as an adhesive.  It was a bit of a bugger to get right but I still have it, over 45 years later.  It was painted with Humbrol enemals.  There wasn't any need for putty or that like 'cause the solder filled all the seams.  It was very, very hot to work with.  I burnt my fingers once or twice working on it.  I had to heat the metal on either side and pour the solder in.   :banghead: :banghead:
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Rick Lowe

Though if the solder has a higher working/melting temperature than the metal the kit's made from...  :banghead:

NARSES2

Quote from: Rick Lowe on February 23, 2021, 01:33:34 PM
Though if the solder has a higher working/melting temperature than the metal the kit's made from...  :banghead:

Interesting results  ;) I've seen something similar happen back in the day. I seem to remember the solder and parts to be soldered had the same or very nearly the same melting points ?
Decals my @r$e!

PR19_Kit

Quote from: NARSES2 on February 24, 2021, 06:11:15 AM

Interesting results  ;) I've seen something similar happen back in the day. I seem to remember the solder and parts to be soldered had the same or very nearly the same melting points ?


Tell me about it......... :(:(

I once rendered a complete white metal 00 gauge loco kit into scrap metal by missing that vital fact.
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

Rick Lowe

Quote from: PR19_Kit on February 24, 2021, 06:24:35 AM
Quote from: NARSES2 on February 24, 2021, 06:11:15 AM

Interesting results  ;) I've seen something similar happen back in the day. I seem to remember the solder and parts to be soldered had the same or very nearly the same melting points ?


Tell me about it......... :(:(

I once rendered a complete white metal 00 gauge loco kit into scrap metal by missing that vital fact.

Ooh, bugger!  :banghead: