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Humbrol Enamels

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Dizzyfugu:
Hmm, I have been using the Humbrol Metalcote for years and never had problems. With age, the paints tend to become dry and more viscous, but from my experience they take thinning well - and they need to be fluid for a good finish. A bigger brush with more volume than you'd normally use (e. g. with standard enamels) is also recommended, because the bigger paint reservoir in the brush tip keeps the whole stuff fluid for a longer period. Small brushes tend to simply dry out, esp. when you create larger areas.

zenrat:

--- Quote from: Dizzyfugu on May 05, 2018, 03:14:57 am ---...A bigger brush with more volume than you'd normally use (e. g. with standard enamels) is also recommended, because the bigger paint reservoir in the brush tip keeps the whole stuff fluid for a longer period. Small brushes tend to simply dry out, esp. when you create larger areas.

--- End quote ---

Good advice but not much use for detail painting car chassis's.

I still have a lot of Humbrol enamels from "before" and they are fine despite being over 30 years old.

Weaver:
Hmmm... :unsure:

I ONLY use Humbrol enamels and I don't have most of these problems, although I have had severe problems with their spray-can varnish in the past (a problem which I believe has now been rectified). I always stir the paint VERY thoroughly. Then I put the paint stirrer on a plastic pallet and ONLY use that as a paint reservoir for the brush: NEVER take paint from the lid or the tin. I occasionally thin it but not often.

I also airbrush it. Again, it seems fine as long as I use ONLY Humbrol thinners (other brands cause problems) and thin it about 2-2.5 parts thinners to 1 part paint. I have a jar-feed single-action airbrush, so it needs quite a lot of air pressure to lift the paint.

It's important to put the lid back on properly. If it's bent, straighten it. If there's dried paint around the sealing surfaces of the tin and/or the lid, clean it off. Press the lid back on as hard and as far as the factory did: I usually put it underneath the bench and then hammer or push on the base of the tin with a lot of force.

Ironically, the only enamel paint I have had consistent problems with is Revell, to the point where I've put all my Revell paints in a separate box and will probably never use them again.

PR19_Kit:

--- Quote from: Weaver on May 05, 2018, 06:46:48 am ---
 I usually put it underneath the bench and then hammer or push on the base of the tin with a lot of force.


--- End quote ---

I can't help feeling there's scope for a tale in the 'Things we did in a miss-spent youth' thread here.................  ;D ;)

Doug K:

--- Quote from: zenrat on May 05, 2018, 04:23:43 am ---
--- Quote from: Dizzyfugu on May 05, 2018, 03:14:57 am ---...A bigger brush with more volume than you'd normally use (e. g. with standard enamels) is also recommended, because the bigger paint reservoir in the brush tip keeps the whole stuff fluid for a longer period. Small brushes tend to simply dry out, esp. when you create larger areas.

--- End quote ---

Good advice but not much use for detail painting car chassis's.

I still have a lot of Humbrol enamels from "before" and they are fine despite being over 30 years old.

--- End quote ---

Iím the same, I have 30 year old tins that are still fine

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