Author Topic: 1:72 FVM JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Air Force trials, 1925  (Read 513 times)

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Offline Dizzyfugu

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1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit)
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit)
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit)
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr



Some background:
The FVM JF-22 ("JF" for Jaktflygplan = fighter aircraft) was a Swedish biplane fighter. It had been designed as a private venture by Gösta von Porat and Henry Kjellson at Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen (FVM) as a potential replacement for to the Swedish Air Force’s contemporary main fighter aircraft, the J1. This was the Austro-Hungarian Phönix D.III, a design dating back to WWI. A total of 10 J1s were operated since 1920, but the type was already outdated upon arrival, and the fleet’s small size was not sufficient, either.

The original design was designated JF-21. It was one of three biplanes among the FVM designs submitted to the Swedish Defense Department, along with competing designs from the national ASJA and Sparmann companies. After an extensive review the JF-21 was chosen in 1923 for limited production for evaluative purposes. The first prototype aircraft was built in early 1924. The JF-21 was a single-bay, unstaggered biplane of conventional configuration. The wings were braced with N-struts at around half-span, ailerons were only fitted to the lower wings in order to simplify construction and save weight, and the aircraft was powered by an imported Hispano-Suiza V8 engine that delivered 224 kW (300 hp). A training version, a two-seater designated Ö-21, was also created, powered with the same engine as the fighter but with a less powerful 180 hp version.


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit)
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit)
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit)
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


Testing revealed some serious stability deficiencies in the JF-21, and the first prototype was lost in a crash on 25th on May 1924, almost killing the pilot. Production was halted after just four airframes, but FVM did not give up on the design. A subsequent redesign in late 1924 morphed the aircraft into its final form as the JF-22. Changes included a wider span of the upper wing, a slightly longer rear fuselage with bigger tail surfaces (a fixed fin was added to the all-movable rudder) and a lifting fairing for the landing gear axle. All these measures were intended to improve flight stability and low speed handling. Furthermore, the interplane bracing was straightened and allowed, as a positive side effect, for a better field of view for the pilot.

Initially, two JF-22s were built during the winter 1924/25 and ready for testing in Spring 1925. Even though the flight characteristics were markedly improved the aircraft still showed some nervous handling characteristics that called for an experienced pilot. Further measures like spats on the main wheels (tested on the 1st prototype in late 1925) did not much improve these deficiencies. In consequence, the Swedish Air Force formally rejected the JF-22 in 1926, after three fighters and two trainers had been built and handed over to frontline units for trials and field evaluation.


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit)
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit)
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit)
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit)
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


At that time, FVM also had two further, experimental variants of the aircraft on the drawing boards, but none of them made it to the hardware stage. These were the JF-22J with a more powerful Jupiter radial engine (with an eye on the export market) and a dedicated race plane, the JF-22R, which was powered by a boosted HS-8Fb engine that delivered 298 kW (400 hp) and was outfitted with the JF-21’s former, shorter wings. The Swedish air force showed no interest and export customers did not materialize, either. In June 1927, FVM was successful in trials staged by the Belgian Air Force and submitted a JF-22 (the 3rd prototype), but the type was once again not accepted.

Instead of the FVM JF-22, the Swedish Air Force adopted the J2 and J3 for service, even though these were rather observation aircraft than pure fighters. Eventually, the indigenous J5/6 was chosen as Sweden’s new single seat fighter in 1930 – and by that time the technical development had advanced so far that the JF-22 had become obsolete.


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit)
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit)
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit)
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit)
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr




General characteristics:
    Crew: One
    Length: 6.87 m (22 ft 6 in)
    Wingspan: 8.90 m (29 ft 2 in)
    Height: 2.74 m (9 ft 0 in)
    Wing area: 21 m² (240 sq ft)
    Empty weight: 765 kg (1,687 lb)
    Gross weight: 1,075 kg (2,370 lb)
    Fuel capacity: 140 kg (310 lb)

Powerplant:
    1× Hispano-Suiza 8Fb V-8 water-cooled piston engine, 224 kW (300 hp) at 1,850rpm,
       driving a 2-bladed wooden propeller

Performance:
    Maximum speed: 250 km/h (160 mph, 130 kn)
    Stall speed: 90 km/h (56 mph, 49 kn)
    Range: 600–650 km (370–400 mi, 320–350 nmi)
    Time to altitude: 7,000 m (23,000 ft) in 35 min

Armament:
    2× m/22 fixed 8 mm (0.315 in) machine guns (license built .30 AN/M2's) with 500 rounds each,
       fitted with synchronization gear and firing through the propeller.




The kit and its assembly:

This relatively simple whif was actually inspired by a decal set for a Swedish J1 biplane. In order to have a “canvas” to put this scheme onto, a suitable aircraft had to be found – and it became the vintage (and dirty cheap) KP kit of the Avia H-21.

The kit turned out to be much better than expected. It has some flash, but the surface and interior details are nice, the kit comes with anything you’d ask for. It’s really good except for a mediocre fit, but that’s acceptable for the molds’ age and, thanks to the simple shapes, PSR is an easy task.
 
Even though the model depicts a fictional Swedish fighter, the kit was built almost OOB and stays close to the Avia H-21, which is IMHO quite elegant. I just reduced the lower wings’ span (which are on the H-21 wider than the upper wing!) for a slightly more conventional look. The propeller was replaced with a better one from the scrap box (IIRC from a Revell SPAD XIII), together with a metal axis and a respective styrene tube adapter. A small fin was added in front of the free-standing rudder (from a Revell Sopwith Triplane), and I added a set of spats that I had found in the spares bin, too. Rigging was done post-painting with heated/stretched black sprue material.


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit) - WiP
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit) - WiP
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit) - WiP
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit) - WiP
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit) - WiP
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


Painting and markings:
The paint scheme is based on a Swedish J1 around 1925, with a pretty three-tone camouflage consisting of two green tones and a sand brown. According to the cource, the undersides were light blue, but I have doubts because unpainted linen ("Duk") was more common on the J1s.
With this basis I did some legwork in trustworthy literature and found the following guesstimates for the respective colors: Ljusbrun: Humbrol 234 (Dark Skin Tone, for a pale reddish earth tone), Mellangrön: Revell 363 (Fern Green) and Mörkgron (I used Modelmaster’s RAF Dark Green, similar to USAF Forest Green FS 34079). Instead of the contemporary standard lacquered fabric underneath I painted the undersides in Humbrol 23 (RAF Duck Egg Green).


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit) - WiP
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit) - WiP
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit) - WiP
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


The engine cover was painted with Humbrol 56, the cockpit interior in Tamiya 57 (Light Buff), simulating unpainted but lacquered fabric. The wing struts as well as the propeller blades were painted in a streaky wet-in-wet mix of Humbrol 62 and 71, simulating wood grain on lacquered wood. The rudder flash was painted with Humbrol 99 and 104.
The model was lightly weathered with a thin black ink washing and some dry-brushing, emphasizing the fabric structures and the model's fine raised surface details. Graphite was used for some exhaust stains.

Markings/decals were minimal: The 1927-style roundels came from a Swedish pre-WWII D.H. Tiger Moth trainer (AZ Models aftermarket sheet), the tactical code was created with single digits in a proper Swedish 1927 font (Flying Colors Aerodecals). Everything was sealed with matt acrylic varnish and the rigging was done as the final step.




1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit)
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit)
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit)
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 FVM (Flygcompaniets Verkstäder at Malmen) JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Royal Air Force acceptance trails with Västmanland Air Force Wing; Västerås (Central Sweden), late 1925 (Whif/modified KP kit)
by Dizzyfugu, on Flickr


A small and quick project, building was done in just two days plus final rigging on day three. While not spectacular, the modified Avia H-21 in Swedish markings looks quite convincing, even more so because it depicts a prototype that never made it into service. And it’s colorful, too! ^^

Offline PR19_Kit

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Very Swedish looking, nice one Thomas.  :thumbsup:

That styrene is SO thick you could have carved it into a totally different aeroplane!  :o
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

Offline Dizzyfugu

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Yes, it's a very solid model kit - but it's not bad at all.

Offline Pellson

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Really nice!  :wub:
Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition!

Offline su27rules

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 :thumbsup: :mellow: :wub:

Offline Dizzyfugu

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Thank you!  ;D

Offline comrade harps

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Looks rugged with those big spats!  :thumbsup:
Whatever.

Offline Dizzyfugu

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Looks rugged with those big spats!  :thumbsup:

Yes, and the track is quite narrow, too. But the wheels inside of the spats were exactly of the same size as the original Avia H-21 wheels, I could not resist - and the spats actually modernize the look of the aircraft a little.  ;)

Offline NARSES2

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I really like that  :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

I could not resist - and the spats actually modernize the look of the aircraft a little.  ;)

They do, don't they
Decals my @r$e!

Offline Hotte

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Nice  :thumbsup:

Hotte

Offline PR19_Kit

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Re: 1:72 FVM JF-22; prototype '221' during Swedish Air Force trials, 1925
« Reply #10 on: July 03, 2021, 03:17:12 am »
Brian da'B would LOVE those spats.  :thumbsup:
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit