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1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, Republic of Scotland Air Corps (RoScAC), 2018

Started by Dizzyfugu, June 21, 2019, 07:37:14 AM

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Dizzyfugu


1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr




Some background:
After the Saab 38 (also known as B3LA) had been cancelled in 1979 in favor of the more advanced Saab JAS 39 Gripen multi-role fighter, Saab presented in 1991 a new trainer design to the Swedish Air Force as a replacement for the Saab 105 (Sk 60) transitional trainer, light attack and reconnaissance aircraft. This new aircraft was internally called "FSK900". The aircraft was a conservative design, with such a configurational resemblance to the Dassault-Dornier Alpha Jet that it is hard to believe Saab engineers didn't see the Alpha Jet as a model for what they wanted to do. However, even if that was the case, the FSK900 was by no means a copy of the Alpha Jet, and the two machines could be easily told apart at a glance. FSK900 had a muscular, rather massive appearance, while the Alpha Jet was more wasp-like and very sleek. The FSK900 was also bigger in length and span and had an empty weight about 10% greater.

The FSK900 was mostly made of aircraft aluminum alloys, with some control surfaces made of carbon-fiber / epoxy composite, plus very selective use of titanium. It had high-mounted swept wings, with a supercritical airfoil section and a leading-edge dogtooth; a conventional swept tail assembly; tricycle landing gear; twin engines, one mounted in a pod along each side of the fuselage; and a tandem-seat cockpit with dual controls.


1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


The wings had a sweep of 27.5°, an anhedral droop of 7°, and featured ailerons for roll control as well as double slotted flaps. The tailplanes were all-moving, and also featured an anhedral of 7°. An airbrake was mounted on each side of the rear fuselage. Flight controls were hydraulic, and hydraulic systems were dual redundant.

Instructor and cadet sat in tandem in a common cockpit, both on zero-zero ejection seats, with the instructor's seat in the rear raised 27 centimeters (10.6 inches) to give a good forward view. The cockpit was pressurized and featured a one-piece canopy, hinged open to the right, which provided excellent visibility.

The landing gear assemblies all featured single wheels, with the nose gear retracting forward and the main gear retracting forward and into the fuselage, featuring an antiskid braking system. The twin engines were two Williams International FJ44-4M turbofans without reheat, each rated at 16.89 kN (3,790 lbst). These were the same engines that Saab had also proposed for Saab's Sk 60 modernization program, even though a less powerful variant for the lighter aircraft.

The FSK900 could be fitted with two pylons under each wing and under the fuselage centerline, for a total of five hardpoints and a total external payload of 2,500 kg (5,500 lb). The inner wing pylons were wet and could take 450 liter (119 US gallon) auxiliary tanks. External stores included a centerline target winch for the target tug role, an air-sampling pod for detection of fallout or other atmospheric pollutants, jammer or chaff pods for electronic warfare training, a camera/sensor pod and a baggage pod for use in the liaison role. The aircraft also featured a baggage compartment in the center fuselage, which also offered space for other special equipment or future updates.

Potential armament comprised a conformal ventral pod with a single 27 mm Mauser BK-27 revolver cannon with 120 rounds (the same weapon that eventually went into the Saab Gripen). Other weapons included various iron and cluster bombs of up to 454 kg (1.000 lb) caliber, unguided missiles of various calibers and the Rb.74 (AIM-9L Sidewinder) AAM. A radar was not mounted, but the FSK900's nose section offered enough space for a radome.


1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


The Swedish Air Force accepted the Saab design, leading to a contract for two nonflying static-test airframes and four flying prototypes. Detail design was complete by the end of 1993 and prototype construction began in the spring of 1994, leading to first flight of the initial prototype on 29 July 1994. The first production "Sk 90A", how the basic trainer type was officially dubbed, was delivered to the Swedish Air Force in 1996.

A total of 108 production Sk 90s were built until 1999 in several versions. The initial Sk 90A trainer was the basis for the Sk 90B variant, which carried a weather radar (this variant was not adopted by the Swedish air force but sold to Austria) and the C variant with a set of cameras in the nose for the Swedish air force. In service, the type was regarded as strong, agile, and pleasant to fly, while being cheap to operate. Swedish Sk 90As flying in the training role were typically painted in the unique "Fields & Meadows" splinter camouflage, although decorative paint jobs showed up on occasion and many aircraft received additional dayglow markings. Some of the few aircraft given to operational squadrons, which used them for keeping up flight hours and as hacks, had been painted in an all-grey camouflage to match the combat aircraft they shared the flight line with.
Despite its qualities and potential, the Sk 90 did not attain much foreign interest, primarily suffering from bad timing and from the focus on domestic demands. The aircraft came effectively 10 years too late to become a serious export success, and in the end the Sk 90 was very similar to the Dassault/Dornier Alpha Jet (even though it was cheaper to operate) - at a time when the German Luftwaffe started to prematurely phase out its attack variant and flooded the global´market with cheap second hand aircraft in excellent condition. Furthermore, the Saab Sk 90 had, with the BAe Hawk, another proven competitor with a long operational track record all over the world.


1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


Potential buyers were Malaysia as well as Singapore, Myanmar, Finland, Poland and Hungary. Austria eventually procured 36 Sk 90 Ö in 2002, replacing its Saab 105 fleet and keeping up its close connection with Saab since the Seventies, and a late customer became the independent Republic of Scotland in 2017, initially with a dozen leased Saab Sk 90A trainers.

This procurement was preceded by a White Paper published by the Scottish National Party (SNP) in 2013, which stated that an independent Scotland would have an air force equipped with up to 16 air defense aircraft, six tactical transports, utility rotorcraft and maritime patrol aircraft, and be capable of "contributing excellent conventional capabilities" to NATO. Outlining its ambition to establish an air force with an eventual 2,000 uniformed personnel and 300 reservists, the SNP stated the organization would initially be equipped with "a minimum of 12 interceptors in the Eurofighter/Typhoon class, based at Lossiemouth, a tactical air transport squadron, including around six Lockheed Martin C-130J Hercules, and a helicopter squadron".

According to the document, "Key elements of air forces in place at independence, equipped initially from a negotiated share of current UK assets, will secure core tasks, principally the ability to police Scotland's airspace, within NATO." An in-country air command and control capability would be established within five years of a decision in favor of independence, it continues, with staff also to be "embedded within NATO structures".

This plan was immediately set into action after the country's independence from Great Britain in late 2017 with the purchase of twelve refurbished Saab JAS 39A Gripen interceptors for Quick Reaction Alert duties and former Swedish Air Force Sk 90A trainers for the nascent Republic of Scotland Air Corps (RoScAC), locally called Saab Sk90A "Iolaire" (Eaglet) T.1. These machines either came from operational Swedish squadrons or were put back into operation from mothballed overstock.


1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


All machines were delivered to Scotland in the Swedish all-grey paint scheme, the machines taken from operational service had their original Swedish markings just painted over. The were all exclusively allocated to the newly established Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School at Kirknewtoun (a former RAF air base) near Edinburgh. In 2019, the RoScAC's first brand new aircraft arrived in the form of TF-50 "Golden Eagle" fighters from South Korea, which, as multi-role two seaters, complemented the Saab Sk 90's in the advanced trainer role and also took over air space patrol duties from the Scottish JAS 39.

In early 2020, the leasing contract for the Sk 90s with Sweden was changed into a formal purchase, and the Iolaire fleet (as well as the Gripen fighters) gradually received the RoScAC's new camouflage scheme in grey and green, which had been introduced with the TF-50s.





General characteristics:
    Crew: two pilots in tandem
    Length incl. pitot: 13.0 m (42 ft 8 in) for the A trainer, 13.68 m (44 ft 10 in) for the S variant
    Wingspan: 9.94 m (32 ft 7 in)
    Height: 4.6 m (15 ft 1 in)
    Empty weight: 3,790 kg (8,360 lb)
    Max. takeoff weight: 7,500 kg (16,530 lb)

Powerplant:
    2× Williams International FJ44-4M turbofans without reheat, rated at 16.89 kN (3,790 lbst) each

Performance:
    Maximum speed: 1,038 km/h (645 mph)
    Range: 1,670 km (900 nm)

Armament:
    No internal gun; five hardpoints for 2,500 kg (5,500 lb) of payload and a variety of ordnance





The kit and its assembly:
This whif is a rarity among my builds, since it is an alternative reality model. A fictional air force of an independent Scotland crept into my mind after the hysterical "Brexit" events in 2016 and the former (failed) public vote concerning the independence of Scotland from the UK. However, the situation bore some serious storytelling potential: What would happen to the military if the independence would have actually taken place and British forces had left the country?

The aforementioned Scottish National Party (SNP) paper from 2013 is actually real, and I took it as a guideline. Primary focus would certainly be set on air space defense, and the Gripen appeared as a good and not too expensive choice. An advanced trainer would also have been needed, and the Sk 90 (a personal invention and already built as a Swedish and Austrian aircraft) would fulfill a complementary role.

A Scottish Sk 90 had been on my agenda since 2016, and now materialized as an addition to my Scottish TF-50 and two Sk 90s (a swedish and an Austrian one). The Saab Sk 90 is basically the 1:72 Kawasaki T-4 from Hasegawa, and since it was to depict an original Sk 90A, formerly operated by Sweden, it was built without modifications. The kit is relatively simple and fit is quite good, even though some PSR was necessary on almost any seam – there are actually two T-4 molds, and this one is the more recent offering.

1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018 by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018 by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


Painting and markings:
I wanted to depict a RoScAC aircraft of the first hour, so I went for a Swedish look with tactical markings from the new operator. Since I already had a Sk 90 in Swedish "Fields & Meadows" camouflage, I decided to go for a Gripen-esque grey-in-grey livery.
Swedish JAS 39 carry a two-tone livery; the upper tone is called pansargrå (tank grey, which is, according to trustworthy sources, very close to FS 36173, Neutral Grey), while the undersides are painted in duvagrå (dove grey, FS 36373, a tone with the confusing name "High Low Visibility Light Grey"), and the simple pattern was faithfully adapted to the T-4.

After checking a lot of Gripen pictures I selected different tones, though, because the colors appear much lighter in real life. I ended up with FS 36231 (Dark Gull Grey, Testors 1740) and RLM 63 (Lichtgrau, Testors 2077) – in combination, these tones come IMHO quite close to the real thing?
After a light black ink wash I emphasized single panels with Humbrol 165 and 147. The cockpit interior was painted with Revell 47 (Mausgrau) while the landing gear became glossy white.

For the RoScAC look I added some manually overpainted patches where the former Swedish roundels and tactical markings would have been. As a trainer, I also added orange dayglow markings on the fin and the wings, created with generic decal sheet material (TL Modellbau). The de-icing devices on the wings' and fin's leading edges were created with black decal stripes instead of paint, a very tidy and simple method. Decal strips in silver were used on the fin's rudder and on the flaps. Small things, but they grade the grey model up visually.

1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018 by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018 by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018 by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018 by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


Another creative field were the national markings: how could fictional Scottish roundels look like, and how to create them so that they are easy to make and replicate (for a full set for this kit, as well as for potential future builds...)? Designing and printing marking decals myself was an option, but I eventually settled for a composite solution which somewhat influenced the roundels' design, too.
My Scottish roundel interpretation, already used on my RoScAC T-50, consists of a simple blue disk with a white cross – a straightforward solution since it's different from any other contemporary national marking, esp. the UK roundel, and easy to create from single decal parts. In fact, the roundel discs were die-punched from blue decal sheet, and the cross consists of two thin white decal strips, cut into the correct length with the same stencil, again using generic sheet material from TL Modellbau.

1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018 by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018 by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


Another issue was the potential tactical code, and a small fleet only needs a simple system. Going back to a WWII system with letter codes for squadrons and individual aircraft was one option, but, IMHO, still too complicated. However, for individual aircraft identification I adopted the familiar British single letter aircraft code, and since the RoScAC would certainly not operate too many squadrons, I rather adapted a system similar to the Swedish or Spanish format with a single number representing the squadron – or, in this case a letter, because the fictional Flying Training School would not be a front line unit.
The result is a simple 2-digit code, and I adapted the German system of placing the tactical code on the fuselage, separated by the roundel. Keeping British traditions up I repeated the individual aircraft code letter on the fin, where I also placed a Scottish flag (scratched from the same decal material as the roundels. A small serial number, created from single black letters (once more Tl Modellbau material) was added on the rear fuselage, and, for some local pride, I added a self-printed coat-of-arms of Edinburgh to the air intakes.

Finally, after some light weathering, the kit was finally sealed with matt acrylic varnish (Italeri).




1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018 by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018 by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018 by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018 by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Saab Sk 90A "Iolaire" T.1, aircraft "TÄG" (s/n 90-07) of the Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC) Eaglais a' Bhaile Ùir Flying Training School; Kirknewtoun Station, Whitemoss/Edinburgh, Republic of Scotland, 2018 by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


Creating this whif, based on an alternative historic timeline and with a near future perspective, was fun – and it might spawn more models that circle around this story. A certain future build is a Saab Gripen in RoScAC colors and there might also be an entry level trainer (Shorts Tucano?), some helicopters for the army or SAR duties and maybe a transport aircraft, but not a big one. The foundation has been laid out, now it's time to fill Scotland's alternative recent history with detail and hardware proof.  ;)

TallEng

Like it a lot :thumbsup:
Looks very attractive in those colours.

Regards
Keith
The British have raised their security level from "Miffed" to "Peeved". Soon though, security levels may be raised yet again to "Irritated" or even "A Bit Cross". Londoners have not been "A Bit Cross" since the Blitz in 1940 when tea supplies ran out for three weeks

Old Wombat

That's a really good looking build, Dizzy, & the back story ain't shabby, either! :thumbsup:
Has a life outside of What-If & wishes it would stop interfering!

"The purpose of all War is Peace" - St. Augustine

veritas ad mortus veritas est

PR19_Kit

It looks really good, but I can't wait for JayBee's reaction to it............  ;) ;D
Kit's Rule 1 ) Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage
Kit's Rule 2) The backstory can always be changed to suit the model

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

Doug K

Really nice and I like the back story, mine will be a joint rUK/Scots training squadron of Hawks (when I get around to it).
I also like the idea of Kirknewton being the training base, it's 5 miles from where I'm sitting but the runway will need some work for any jets 😉

Weaver

Nice one Dizzy - it looks great, and very credible. :thumbsup:

We actually had a Scottish Independence GB over on BTS back around the time of the referendum, and I made a start on a 2nd hand F-16B for them, with exactly the same roundel choice that you made. Unfortunately, I decided to paint it rather than decal it and it all went horribly wrong, so the model lies in the ever-increasing pile of unfinished projects... :banghead:

I went for a rather darker two-tone grey scheme, nicknamed 'fog and drizzle...'  :wacko: ;)
"Things need not have happened to be true. Tales and dreams are the shadow-truths that will endure when mere facts are dust and ashes, and forgot."
 - Morpheus in Sandman: A Midsummer Night's Dream, by Neil Gaiman

"I dunno, I'm making this up as I go."
 - Indiana Jones '

Scotaidh

Very nice! 

This joins Nonobars' 'Scottish F16AT of the First Air Dragoons' (found here: https://www.whatifmodellers.com/index.php?topic=46234.0)

and my companion 'Royal Scottish AF Goshawk' (found here: https://www.whatifmodellers.com/index.php?topic=46318.0)

It seems the Independent Scotland will have a very capable air force once we're all done stocking it!  :) 
Thistle dew, Pig - thistle dew!

Where am I going?  And why am I in a handbasket?

It's dark in the dark when it's dark. Ancient Ogre Proverb

"All right, boyz - the plan iz 'Win.'  And if ya lose, it's yer own fault 'coz ya didn't follow the plan."

Dizzyfugu

Thank you all, glad you like it. It's not the first Scottish aircraft in my collection/private universe - but I wanted to create a "1st hour of independence" aircraft, hence the quite boring grey Swedish livery with overpainted markings of the former operator. A Gripen might follow some day, but then closer to the later scheme that I devised, here applied to my first RoScAC build:


1:72 KAI/Lockheed Martin TA-50 'Golden Eagle TF.1', '2-D' (s/n 50-04) of No. 2 (Fìobha) Squadron, Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC); Leuchars Station, Fifeshire, Republic of Scotland, 2020 (Whif/Academy kit)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 KAI/Lockheed Martin TA-50 'Golden Eagle TF.1', '2-D' (s/n 50-04) of No. 2 (Fìobha) Squadron, Poblachd na h-Alba Adhair an Airm (Republic of Scotland Air Corps/RoScAC); Leuchars Station, Fifeshire, Republic of Scotland, 2020 (Whif/Academy kit)
by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

TomZ

Reality is an illusion caused by an alcohol deficiency

PR19_Kit

Kit's Rule 1 ) Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage
Kit's Rule 2) The backstory can always be changed to suit the model

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

scooter

The F-106- 26 December 1956 to 8 August 1988
Gone But Not Forgotten

QuoteOh are you from Wales ?? Do you know a fella named Jonah ?? He used to live in whales for a while.
— Groucho Marx

My dA page: Scooternjng

zenrat

What show is that please Scoot?

<edit>  OK found it.  801 TTS Airbats.  Worth a look?

Fred

- Can't be bothered to do the proper research and get it right.

Another ill conceived, lazily thought out, crudely executed and badly painted piece of half arsed what-if modelling muppetry from zenrat industries.

zenrat industries:  We're everywhere...for your convenience..

scooter

Quote from: zenrat on June 22, 2019, 06:28:59 PM
What show is that please Scoot?

<edit>  OK found it.  801 TTS Airbats.  Worth a look?

Its...interesting, I'll say that.  I'd recommend it just for the humour of the series.
The F-106- 26 December 1956 to 8 August 1988
Gone But Not Forgotten

QuoteOh are you from Wales ?? Do you know a fella named Jonah ?? He used to live in whales for a while.
— Groucho Marx

My dA page: Scooternjng

zenrat

Fred

- Can't be bothered to do the proper research and get it right.

Another ill conceived, lazily thought out, crudely executed and badly painted piece of half arsed what-if modelling muppetry from zenrat industries.

zenrat industries:  We're everywhere...for your convenience..

DogfighterZen

"Sticks and stones may break some bones but a 3.57's gonna blow your damn head off!!"