Resin Models for First Timers Query

Started by Cobra, May 13, 2010, 09:58:36 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

Cobra

Hey Guys, Can Anyone tell me what Resin Model Maker would be good for someone Who's Never Tried to Build one before? kinda tempted by the Unicraft models & would like to know what you guys think. trying build some models now & not sure if i want to try a Resin Model. Thanks for Looking.Dan

upnorth

Though I've never built a Unicraft kit, the pictures I've seen of what comes out of their boxes and the fact that some folks call them "Unicrap" is rather telling. Certainly not for the resin novice even if something worthwhile can be made from their kits.

I've built a couple of Planet Models kits and they weren't so bad. Their Pilatus PC-7 and their SIAI SM.260 were pretty straight forward and I think a resin novice could get something decent from either kit.
My Blogs:

Pickled Wings: http://pickledwings.com/

Beyond Prague: http://beyondprague.net/

Hobbes

I've had good experiences with Anigrand, Silver Cloud and BraZ kits.

To build a Unicraft kit, you need some experience with:
- using putty to fill large gaps (e.g. with Milliput)
- using styrene stock to fill even larger gaps
- CA glue.

Other than that, lots of patience for all the sanding you need to do. Which Unicraft kit do you want to build?


Cobra

i was thempted by the RAD that Mossie put up. that Caught my Interest.

McGreig

Anybody who can build conventional plastic kits ought to be able to get a good result from Anigrand, Planet, Czech Master, A&V, RVHP or Omega.

Unicraft, on the other hand, are more challenging. They have a lot of unique subjects but they are unquestionably more difficult to build. However my experience of them is that it is not the fact that they are resin kits that is the problem but that the casting and definition of the parts is often very poor - like Hobbes says, you will probably need to do a lot of filling, sanding and rescribing but, given patience and perseverance, you can get a good result.

NARSES2

Starter resin kits ? As mentioned Anigrand are a good start as are some of the latter Magna kits. Just take your time
Do not condemn the judgement of another because it differs from your own. You may both be wrong.

anthonyp

I second (or third... fourth?) Anigrand definitely.  Planet and Czech Master are also highly recommended for first timers.

If you want a ship, I'd recommend either Midships Models or JAG.  Both top notch.
I exist to pi$$ others off!!!
My categorized models directory on my site.
My site (currently with no model links).
"Build what YOU like, the way YOU want to." - a wise man

pyro-manic

Maybe start with a resin conversion or detail set (eg. resin cockpit, engines, etc), rather than a full kit? Less to do, cheaper, and a way to build up your skills before tackling a full kit?
Some of my models can be found on my Flickr album >>>HERE<<<

dragon

I am a fairly experienced model builder.  I have built a couple of resin kits in the past.  I also have a confession: I do have a resin kit that scares the willies out of me.  I have a resin kit and a vacuform kit of a Caudron G3.  Those kits scare me silly. :o
"As long as people are going to call you a lunatic anyway, why not get the benefits of it?  It liberates you from convention."- from the novel WICKED by Gregory Maguire.
  
"I must really be crazy to be in a looney bin like this" - Jack Nicholson in the movie ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST

Gary

Go simple. My first resin was a Luft 46 thing with several thousand parts. Need I say more. However I am currently building the sweet Anigrand Lavi. The only real difficulty was having to heat the vert stab and flattening the curl out of it.
Getting back into modeling

chrisonord

The only resin kits I have built are by Jadar,of Poland. They make some very nice subjects especially the 1/72nd scale armour, but they frightened the living crap out of me and I have had varying success  building the kits I have. The instructions for a start are completely useless, and demand a lot of guess work. The parts all need a lot of work doing to them and can be very brittle as I found out whilst building the now abandoned HEMTT I got of theirs. So in a nutshell, I would not bother with their stuff until you are really confident with resin kits. Unlike me :rolleyes: :lol:
Chris.   
The dogs philosophy on life.
If you cant eat it hump it or fight it,
Pee on it and walk away!!

BlackOps

Fantastic Plastic has extremely nice quality and some really cool subject matter to choose from. Great to deal with too.

http://www.fantastic-plastic.com/onlinecatalog.htm
Jeff G.
Stumbling through life.

Weaver

Quote from: dragon on May 15, 2010, 01:49:35 AM
I am a fairly experienced model builder.  I have built a couple of resin kits in the past.  I also have a confession: I do have a resin kit that scares the willies out of me.  I have a resin kit and a vacuform kit of a Caudron G3.  Those kits scare me silly. :o

I'm in exactly the same position re my PZL P.24s: resin kit, vacform kit, don't hold your breath...... :rolleyes:
"Things need not have happened to be true. Tales and dreams are the shadow-truths that will endure when mere facts are dust and ashes, and forgot."
 - Morpheus in Sandman: A Midsummer Night's Dream, by Neil Gaiman

"I dunno, I'm making this up as I go."
 - Indiana Jones '

kitnut617

Although I have quite a few resin kits, I've only built three of them.  I wouldn't say I was 'scared' of building them, just that I was inexperienced at building them but the ones I did do came out ok.  Having done the ones I have I've realized that there's a bit more preparation to do to make it easier, things like making some 'line-up' pins when assembling them would go a long way to help.  Anigrand does at least make some rudimental line-up stubs on their kits but most of the resin kits I have don't.

These are the ones completed so far.


If I'm not building models, I'm out riding my dirtbike

nev

Quote from: chrisonord on May 19, 2010, 03:38:42 PM
1/72nd scale armour

Chris makes a great point - the small scale resin tanks from the likes of Millicast & Cromwell are cracking kits which are usually easier than most IM kits in that scale due to the fewer parts and greater detail.  An ideal introduction to the medium.
Between almost-true and completely-crazy, there is a rainbow of nice shades - Tophe


Sales of Airfix kits plummeted in the 1980s, and GCSEs had to be made easier as a result - James May