avatar_PR19_Kit

What the.....?

Started by PR19_Kit, December 10, 2008, 09:16:52 AM

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PR19_Kit

I'm just watching 'James May's 20th Century' on Discovery (Sky 533) and he's on about the Dragon Rapide being the aircraft that opened up commercial flight to the British public. All well and good but........

He compares it to an all white 747 which is conveniently parked on the airfield he's flying from. This 747 has four engines as you'd expect, but in DUAL PAIRS on the inboard pylons, like a B-52! Not only that, it has drop tanks on the outer pylons, again they look like B-52 items. The engines aren't B-52 size as far as I can see, but they aren't quite as big as the usual P&W JT9-Ds.

Two questions, 1) What's all that about? and 2) Where is this weird oddity?

It's not Kemble, I know that too well but it could be Bruntingthorpe or Blackbushe perhaps? Anyone any answers?
Kit's Rule 1 ) Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage
Kit's Rule 2) The backstory can always be changed to suit the model

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

pyro-manic

It's at the Top Gear test track. It's an old 747, that was altered for the Casino Royale film. We've had a few other topics on it recently. It's not airworthy. IIRC, there was some computer trickery used to further alter it's appearance in the film. :)
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Hobbes


jester

It was originally bought, without engines, to provide an airliner for film/tv crews as they can't get to film on aircraft easily now because of security post 9/11. They realised it looked wrong without engines so got some to hang on it.


kitnut617

Go onto airliners.net, in the top right search bar type in James Bond 747, a couple of pics come up.
If I'm not building models, I'm out riding my dirtbike

PR19_Kit

kitnut et al,

Excellent pointer, thank you.

Those nacelles look pretty good, real state of the art, but as for them being '..similar to that of a B-52 Stratofortess' I can only suggest the writer has never seen BUFF close up........... :(
Kit's Rule 1 ) Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage
Kit's Rule 2) The backstory can always be changed to suit the model

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

JoeP

Captain Slow can _fly_?!  :unsure: :o

The Top Gear gang are whiffers, just working in 1-1 scale.
In want of hobby space!  The kitchen table is never stable.  Still managing to get some building done.

B777LR


PR19_Kit

Hm, yes, something doesn't stack up there.

The wing-engine-tank combination is the same on the Dunsfold 747 and the 'Skyfleet' in the film, but the fuselage nose is all wrong. In the film clip there's almost no Upper Deck bulge and the cockpit windows are much lower on the nose than any 747. And the nose has no step in it.

So how did they do that?

A 1/1 scale Whiff job on the Dunsfold aircraft?

Oh yes, if you were driving a tanker full of JetA1 would you REALLY T-bone a bendy bus? I don't think so..........
Kit's Rule 1 ) Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage
Kit's Rule 2) The backstory can always be changed to suit the model

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

jcf

Quote from: PR19_Kit on December 11, 2008, 11:46:07 AM
Hm, yes, something doesn't stack up there.

The wing-engine-tank combination is the same on the Dunsfold 747 and the 'Skyfleet' in the film, but the fuselage nose is all wrong. In the film clip there's almost no Upper Deck bulge and the cockpit windows are much lower on the nose than any 747. And the nose has no step in it.

So how did they do that?

A 1/1 scale Whiff job on the Dunsfold aircraft?


The nosejob is CGI, the line of the top of the bulge is extended forward and aft to give a double-decker effect, the new nose line intersects at an angle and the cockpit windows were moved down.

Jon

B777LR

#10
Quote from: PR19_Kit on December 11, 2008, 11:46:07 AM
Hm, yes, something doesn't stack up there.

The wing-engine-tank combination is the same on the Dunsfold 747 and the 'Skyfleet' in the film, but the fuselage nose is all wrong. In the film clip there's almost no Upper Deck bulge and the cockpit windows are much lower on the nose than any 747. And the nose has no step in it.

So how did they do that?

A 1/1 scale Whiff job on the Dunsfold aircraft?

As Jon said, CGI. They didnt paint the plane either, and the tail has also been extended, not to mention winglets :thumbsup:
Has something to do with Boeing having copyright on the 747s design. There is another example of this in Iron Man (although this is 100% CGI, no modified 737-800s used here): http://philsaunders.blogspot.com/2008/05/and-on-that-subject-stark-jet.html

PR19_Kit

You'd think if they could CGI a nose that big they could do the whole thing, weird engines and all.

Very odd.
Kit's Rule 1 ) Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage
Kit's Rule 2) The backstory can always be changed to suit the model

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

Jeffry Fontaine

I remember this discussion had come up before on the forum and here is the link: real life whif
There was also an image link within the topic to the Airliners.net page with an image of the aircraft taken from above
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