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Offline anthonyp

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« Reply #15 on: July 01, 2007, 07:42:45 pm »
I'm not even on page 2 yet?  Well, I'll just have to remedy that...  China:

Mig-29 Chinese People’s Liberation Army Air Force

Prior to the final decision to proceed with the J-10, the PLAAF purchased three regiments worth of Mig-29’s to accompany the Su-30’s into Chinese service, under the auspices of testing out the two fighters in conjunction with one another.

In reality, the Chinese desired to backwards engineer the Mig and Sukhoi fighters, in order to learn their secrets, possibly improve upon the designs, and begin unlicensed production for themselves.

Lessons learned from the Mig-29 deconstrucitons yielded enough information to improve the design of the J-10, and how to build better Mig-29’s should that path be pursued.  As it turned out, the J-10 was developed and built in numbers, while the Mig-29 was never built domestically.  Instead, the Chinese were happy with the 106 Mig-29’s purchased from Russia, and used them as an interim design until the J-10 could be produced.

(This is a 1/72 Testors (I think… either that or an Airfix one) Mig-29)



For more pics, click here.

A-10 (Mig-37) Chinese People’s Liberation Army Air Force

The Soviet Union began development of a stealth fighter towards the end of the Cold War.  A total of two regiments worth of fighters were eventually built and deployed by Russia.  Unknown to the Russians, however, the design did not end with them.  Chinese spies infiltrated the Mig OKB and managed to steal incomplete plans for the fighter.  Fortunately for the Russians, certain classified components and alloys were not stolen by the Chinese.  The Chinese would not come into possession of those materials until a Mig-37UB got lost on a training mission and flew into Chinese territory before running out of fuel and crashing

Seeing this as a good omen, the Chinese resumed development of their version of the MIg-37, and eventually developed a slightly less effective version, but built them in greater numbers.

(This is an Italeri 1/72 Mig-37)



For more pics, click here.

Q-10 (Mirage F1B) Chinese People’s Liberation Army Navy

As a result of one of the technology transfers (read “donations”) between France and China in the early 80’s, the PLAAF got their hands on approximately 50 Mirage F1B’s, minus most systems.  At first, only a handful were kept, and the rest transferred to Pakistan, but these were recalled for non-license production purposes after the Pakistanis had developed indigenous weapons for the planes.  The Chinese agreed to share the production run of the planes in return for their return.  The Pakistanis also agreed to send along weapons systems to arm the planes.

This particular example serves with a naval patrol squadron.  It’s armed with four Scimitar missiles (two IR, two radar), one CS-799 Chinese Exocet copy, and the data link pod for controlling the missile.

(This is a Heller (I think) 1/72 Mirage F1B kit.  I say I think because I don’t remember.  It’s the kit with the multiple noses, and the gear where you need to put each friggin piece together on)



For more pics, click here.


JL-3 (Su-9) Chinese People’s Liberation Army Air Force

The Su-9 is another example of Chinese reverse engineering.  The heavy interceptor was used along the Chinese border by Russia during its early days, and as a result, a number crashed, some due to “mysterious circumstances.”  It was revealed later that at least two of the planes had been stolen by Chinese operatives, and flown to China where the large planes were taken apart.  In total, 1023 of the planes entered Chinese service before production ended.

(This is a 1/72 Leoman Su-9 kit.  It’s got a deformed tailplane, and I didn’t feel like fixing it, mainly because this thing was such a cheap kit)



For more pics, click here.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2007, 08:53:06 pm by anthonyp »
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Offline anthonyp

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« Reply #16 on: July 01, 2007, 07:44:00 pm »
Back to Europe... again... Spain!

Spanish Armada FJ-4 Fury

One of the jet first fighters operated off the Santissima Trinidad (Midway class ex-USS Kitty Hawk CVB-56) was the FJ-4 Fury.  The fighter actually entered service right after the USN squadrons received theirs.

The fighter served until 1966, when they were replaced in the light attack role with A-4B’s.  They continued to serve from land bases until 1974.  The type performed its last carrier landing and take off in May 1973.

(This is the Emhar 1/72 FJ-4 kit.  Nice little kit).



For more pics, click here.


Spanish Air Force F-15C

Just after service entry of the F/A-18A into Spanish service, it became evident that the plane lacked the range, speed, and payload to lend support quickly to Allies should the Warsaw Pact storm across the border.  While the Hornet provided excellent strike fighter capabilities, it proved less than satisfactory in the pure interceptor role.  

A requirement for 60 interceptor fighters was put out, with participating designs being on the decidedly heavy end of the spectrum, with the F-15, the F-14, Tornado F.3 and Mirage 4000 being offered.  The French government withdrew the Mirage 4000 on account that it wasn’t even being purchased by the Armée de l'Air.  That left the two American and one British design as the leading candidates.  After a fly-off between the three, it was decided to purchase the F-15C, which the US had recently opened up to export, though the F-14 was almost chosen because of the AIM-54/AWG-9 system (it proved too expensive, though).

The below example is in a non-standard camouflage scheme.  Most Spanish Eagles are painted in standard the USAF Eagle grey scheme, with either high or low-vis national roundel.

(This is a 1/72 Academy F-15C kit.  Always a nice build)



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Offline anthonyp

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« Reply #17 on: July 01, 2007, 07:44:46 pm »
Up next, Portugal.  This one just looks cool in my book:

Portuguese Navy F-4S

The Portuguese Navy used to rule the world… 500 years ago.  Soon after the Age of Exploration (or perhaps during), Portugal’s influence over the world lapsed, and with it the once mighty Portuguese navy.  It wouldn’t be until the later half of the 20th century for the Marinha to regain some of its lost luster.  That was when the US began selling their CVV type of export carrier design to any and all allied takers.  Portugal was an eager customer, and selected a ship built to the smaller CVV design.

The Vasco da Gama was commissioned in 1983.  It carried two squadrons of F-4N’s initially, then upgraded to F-4S’s in 1987 as the carrier deck interceptor.  These served until 2002 when they were replaced (along with the A-4M’s and A-7E’s in the attack roles) with F/A-18C’s in the medium attack and air defense roles, supplemented with JAS39N’s for light attack and interception duties.

It is expected that by 2010 an additional carrier might be purchased, leading to the F/A-18C’s being supplemented with either naval Eurofighters or F/A-18E’s (more likely the Super Hornet, to take advantage of lessons learned from Hornet deployments).

The below F-4S is typical of Portuguese Phantoms, in that it carries a non-standard camouflage scheme (a modified Ferris scheme).  Portuguese Phantoms never really had a standard color scheme, save the tactical grey they were delivered in.

(This is a 1/72 Fujimi F-4S kit)



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Offline anthonyp

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« Reply #18 on: July 01, 2007, 07:45:23 pm »
Going to South Africa, now:

South African Air Force Javelin

The SAAF was the first export of the Javelin interceptor, sold towards the end of active duty with the RAF.  A total of four squadrons were purchased by South Africa.  These planes soldiered on until the mid-70’s, when they were replaced by ex-RCN F-104’s.

(This is a Novo 1/72 Javelin kit.  Ugly on the sprues (lots of flash).  Sorta gave up on this one partway through the build)



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Offline anthonyp

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« Reply #19 on: July 01, 2007, 07:46:07 pm »
Staying with the "South" motif, South Korea:

South Korean Air Force F-101B

In the mid-60’s, the SKAF was sold F-101B’s to patrol the sky’s near the DMZ.  These planes were wired to fire the nuclear Genie air-to-air rocket, but only did so when an American officer was flying in the backseat (since all nuclear weapons on the Korean Peninsula south of the DMZ were guarded by the US).

Four squadrons of these planes patrolled the skies until they were retired in 1996.

(This was a Revell 1/72 F-101B.)



For more pics, click here.


South Korean Navy Skypirate

While the Skypirate may have been a failure as a heavy carrier based bomber in USN service, it made a reasonably good land-based naval bomber for smaller nations.  The South Koreans were exported the Skypirate in 1948, where the plane went onto have a relatively successful career against the North Koreans during the war.

A total of 52 Skypirates were exported to South Korea.  They served until 1960, when they were replaced by S-2 Trackers.

(This was a 1/72 Planet Models Skypirate kit.  A large, and temperamental, resin kit.  Overall, it was a nice build, but the prop was a pain in the butt to get right)



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Offline anthonyp

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« Reply #20 on: July 01, 2007, 07:47:21 pm »
Next up, three countries that speak French (not one of which is France).  Quebec!

République du Quebec Viggen Weasel

The République du Quebec’s previous EW fighter was a variant of the Swedish Viggen.  This variant combined the front end of the recce Viggen, with the tandem cockpits of the trainer Viggen.

This example shows the typical jammer loadout, though missing are the droptanks or missiles typically carried on a mission.  This plane is displayed in the northern winter camouflage the type usually carried.  

All Viggen Weasels were withdrawn from service in 1999, with the introduction of the Rafale W.

(This is a, um, I know this…  what’s that 1/72 Viggen kit with the noses for all three variants?  Yeah, whichever one that is, this is it.)



For more pics, click here.



République du Quebec Jaguar Interceptor

In the late 70’s, the République du Quebec had a requirement for a rough field capable fighter interceptor.  Jaguar fighter bombers fit the bill almost exactly, and were refit into decent interceptors, about as capable as CF-104’s, though a bit slower.  They carried a small radar in the nose, and could launch up to four short range AAM’s.

 As the Cold War pressed on, however, it became apparent that short range intercepts of cross-polar bombers would not do.  The Jaguar interceptor forward fuselage was replaced with the fuselage from a two-seat trainer.  The radar was upgraded to a digital version about the same size as the original, and newer weapons systems were integrated, include the R530D and eventually Mica missiles.

The below example is a typical example, shown in winter camouflage, two R530D’s, and four Mica’s (two IR above the wings and two radar guided on a twin launching rail on the centerline).

(This is a 1/72 Italeri Jaguar T.2 modded up with missiles.  Custom decals abound!)



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Offline anthonyp

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« Reply #21 on: July 01, 2007, 07:48:03 pm »
Next up the Republic of French Louisiana!

République de la Louisiane Française Rafale W

In 1997, the République de la Louisiane Française needed a replacement for their previous Wild Weasel aircraft, a modified version of the Buccaneer.  An RFP was sent out to all the world’s aircraft companies.  The contenders eventually came down to the export version of the proposed F-15G, an export F-16G, the F-26G in development for the USAF, the Rafale W (EW Rafale B ), the Euroweasel Typhoon, and the Su-34.  Seeing as how most of the planes had yet to fly, and of the two currently deployed, one was having issues (the F-16G), the decision was put off until replacement was absolutely necessary.

The Buccaneers were finally removed from duty in 2002, necessitating a decision.  By that time, the F-15G was removed from the competition, as was the Su-34 and F-16G.  The frontrunners became the F-26G and the Rafale W, due to their small size and having already flown operationally (the Rafale W with the République du Quebec).  After a fly-off, the Rafale W was selected.

The below example is a typical short range loadout of one AGM-88, two AGM-65’s, two AIM-9’s, and various jammers and targeting pods, including a massive ALQ-99.  Two of this type can be carried on the inner pylons should the jamming mission be needed.

Currently, Louisiana deploys 24 Rafale W’s, with Quebec deploying another 36.

(This model is a 1/72 Italeri Rafale B, with various weapons and stores from other models, and mostly custom decals)



For more pics, click here.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2007, 08:59:05 pm by anthonyp »
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Offline anthonyp

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« Reply #22 on: July 01, 2007, 07:48:43 pm »
Next up, Rallymodeller's St. Amand (I butchered the name):

St. Amand F-84H

(With apologies to Rallymodeller, I done run over his concept with my car, then backed up a time or three…  The original thread can be found here.)

St. Amand acquired two squadrons of ex-USAF F-84H’s in the early 1960’s (though there’s no record of the transaction, since the clerk handling typing up the transfer forms typed “St. Amand” as “St. Amant”).

These planes flew maritime patrols until replaced by Mirages in the early 1970’s.

(Um… I think this is an Italeri/Testors 1/72 F-84H… I think.)



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« Last Edit: July 03, 2007, 05:05:32 pm by anthonyp »
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Offline anthonyp

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« Reply #23 on: July 01, 2007, 07:49:38 pm »
Next up, Patagonia...  yeah, I know that sounds weird...

Patagonian Defense Force He-162

Towards the end of WWII, the SS began to sneak high ranking party officials, as well as scientists and engineers, out of Germany and into Argentina.  ODESSA, as it was called, moved Germans all over the world, most though, ended up in Argentina, by way of Buenos Aries.

The relocated Germans setup camp in the southern part of the country, most likely because it reminded them of the Alps.  Patagonia was one of the primary places that they settled, and began to set up industry.  One of the many things brought with the Germans were plans for military equipment.  Among these were the He-162 defense interceptor, which went into low-rate production in 1946.

These planes were dispersed throughout Patagonia, at discreet airports for use against the eventual Allied invasion of Neues Deutschland.  However, the locals (and Chile) didn’t like the idea of an armed force in their territory that wasn’t there for their protection.  Knowing Argentina really didn’t care about their region, the Patagonians (with Chilean assistance), overthrew the Nazis on the night of January 9th, 1947.  

Patagonia immediately seized all assets from Neues Deutschland, including the He-162’s and their factories, as well as numerous other arms and goods plants.

Relations with Chile are warm, while those with Argentina are cool, at best.  The territory seized was all Argentinian (granted, they didn’t really use it), and the Chileans viewed the area as a buffer zone.  (A well armed buffer zone.)

The Patagonians used the He-162 as their primary defense interceptor until 1955, when it was replaced by Shooting Stars.

(This is a Dragon 1/72 He-162, which is actually a neat little airplane.  Sorta reminded me of a single engine poor man’s A-10, with the shape of the wings, tail surfaces, engine pod, and forward gun.)



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« Reply #24 on: July 01, 2007, 07:50:23 pm »
Going back to the Pacific one last time, Vietnam:

Vietnamese People’s Air Force F-8II

As part of the ongoing cooperation between China and Vietnam, the Chinese sold Vietnam a number of capable interceptors to patrol the skies over the South China Sea.  Three regiments of F-8II’s were sold, along with spares and the option for another regiment’s worth of planes.

The pilots of these planes aren’t nearly as aggressive as their Chinese counterparts, though.  There have been no recorded incidents of mid-air collisions with a potential enemy’s Intelligence gathering planes.

These planes replaced a number of Mig-21’s used since the 70’s.

(This was a Trumpeter 1/72 F-8II kit)



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Offline anthonyp

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« Reply #25 on: July 01, 2007, 07:51:27 pm »
Finally, I get to the Cold War countries.  The UK!

RAF Eagle F.1 (F-15K)

Prior to committing to the purchase of the Tornado ADV in large numbers, the RAF was offered a temptation by the US and McDonnel Douglas.  McD had developed an export version of their F-15B Eagle, equipped with Spey engines and British systems.  Because of the size of the Eagle’s standard engines, the selected Speys fit easily into the airframe, not requiring the extensive redesign that took place with the Phantom.  Sky Flash missiles were essentially the same shape as Sparrows, so all that was needed was internal electronics modifications.  A retractable in flight refueling probe was also fitted, taking the space where the USAF’s fueling receptacle was located.

In addition, since the F-15K was based on the F-15B, it already had the second crewman that was required for air defense built in.  It was an impressive package of modifications with a (relatively) low price for such a plane.  The RAF couldn’t say no.

Unfortunately for the RAF, though, the government could say no, and did.  Only through the usual politicking needed to push something through did seventy four F-15K’s enter service, yielding to the less capable Tornado ADV for primary air defense.

Even though the Eagle F.1 outperformed the Tornado in virtually all areas, the government dictated where they be used.  The F-15K’s weren’t assigned to the northern bases in Scotland to defend against Soviet aggression, rather, one rotated in and out of the Falklands, while the others patrolled the skies over Germany and London.

The below example is typical of the fighters sent to the Falklands.  It is shown in standard ferry configuration (three droptanks) and colours.

(This was a 1/72 ESCI F-15B kit, with engine nozzles from a Fujimi F-4K, and decals from one of the various Eurofighter kits (I think the two seat Italeri one, though I’m not sure)).



For more pics, click here.



RAF SEAC F-15B(UK)

Where getting the F-15K into service was like pulling teeth, equipping the Southeast Asia Command with any aircraft was akin to an appendectomy performed with a butter knife, ie, while meaning well, not at all pleasant.

Towards the end of the 80’s, China and their allies began to make noise about renewed conflict in that part of the world.  The RAF, while still needing to defend all parts of the empire, simply didn’t have the equipment to send should shooting start.  Already stretched because of the Soviet Union and the Falklands in the West, the East had to make due with older equipment up until now.  The RAF was ready to disband the SEAC when the Americans once again showed up with an offer they couldn’t refuse (some in the RAF began to wonder if the US aircraft companies were run by Mafioso with these timely offers).

The USAF and McDonnel Douglas offered up 64 ex-USAF F-15B’s for use by the RAF in Southeast Asia.  They were modified similar to the F-15K’s, though they kept the US engines and most electronic equipment.

These fighters flew out of various bases around the Pacific, though the greatest concentration of them were at Hong Kong.

(This was some F-15A/B kit, I think the Airfix one.)



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Offline elmayerle

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« Reply #26 on: July 01, 2007, 07:51:48 pm »
Quote
Next, the Bahamas!

Tradewinds Bahamian Navy

The old Tradewinds amphibious cargo plane never really made it in USN service, though exports to the civilian and allied island nations did keep the production line open after the USN gave up.  Even though the original engines never lived up to expectations, they did provide enough power for the planes in their new roles of short range hauling around the Caribbean and South Seas.  

The Bahamian Navy purchased three of these planes for use in cargo transporting and personnel movement throughout the islands.  After their first reengining in 1967, the planes would become much more reliable and longer ranged.  Two subsequent engine upgrades took place, allowing continued service.  The planes are expected to continue in service until 2009, when the Grumman HU-30 comes online.

(This is one of those reissued Revell Tradewinds kits)



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Simple answer to the engine problem would be to replace the XT40s with T54s, produced by Allison rebuilding the XT40s using T56 parts where ever possible (essentially, that's what he T54 was supposed to have been).  Simple and yields a very functional design for this purpose.

Gorgeous model there, Anthony.
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Offline anthonyp

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« Reply #27 on: July 01, 2007, 07:57:57 pm »
Next, the USA.  I could have split this into Michigan and the rest of the USA, but the two from Michigan don't really deserve threads of their own.  Well, maybe they do, but as we've already established, I'm lazy.

USN F-13A Dragon

The F-13A Dragon is little more than a SAAB Draken used by the USN for aggressor training.  None of the planes fly armed, and are stripped down to provide Dissimilar Combat Training for USN pilots, similar to the mission that the F-21 performed.

A myriad of paint schemes have been used on the 50 F-13’s purchased, this one is one of the many Ferris scheme painted Dragons.

The entire Dragon fleet was retired in 1993, due to stress on the airframe.

(This is a deformed 1/72 MPC Draken.  The forward fuselage had a couple holes in it that needed work).



For more pics, click here.



USN FX-29A

In addition to non-US designs for DCT, the USN explored using experimental aircraft for training.  The two that presented the most promise for learning experiences were the X-29 and X-31.  One squadron of each plane were built.  They deployed not only on training missions around their home bases, but were integral parts to the Red Flag exercises in the Nevada desert.  The FX-29 and FX-31 were so successful that actual fighter variants were explored, though only the FX-31 came close to construction.

All FX-29’s and FX-31’s were retired in 1995, though the types would show up again in 2001 after the aggressor squadrons were reestablished.  FX-29 crews lovingly referred to their planes with the nickname of “Jolt,” no doubt in reference to the high they felt after a flight (not unlike downing a bottle of Jolt cola in under a minute).

(Obviously this is a Hasegawa 1/72 X-29 kit with decals and paint scheme from a Hasegawa F-16N)



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Michigan Air National Guard 107th Fighter Squadon F-18L

The F-17 may have lost the LWF competition, but the evolutionary F/A-18 and F-18L’s found success where the F-17 foundered.  One place where the F-18L found success was sales to the USAF for use in second line units, particularly the ANG.

The below example is shown in one of the three paint schemes applied to the type.  The other two are similar to the F-15’s compass ghost, and an overall grey scheme similar to the F-111.

(This is an early ESCI 1/72 F-18 kit, with gear from some F-15, since I used the gear to make either the F-15M or F-15N.)



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USAF 524th Bombardment Squadron FB-119A

The FB-119A is a replacement for the FB-111 in USAF service.  The FB-119A is an evolutionary stealth bomber, designed to suppress enemy air defenses with SRAM II’s in a nuclear war, or penetrate enemy air defenses to deliver surgical strikes in a conventional war.

The FB-119’s similarity to the design for a speculative Cold War stealth fighter is not a coincidence.  The “F-19” stealth fighter was a matter of extreme speculation and the genesis for more than a few conspiracy theories.  The design was actually a good one, though it made more sense to have the plane be an intercontinental bomber as opposed to a tactical strike airplane.

Low-rate production began in 1996, with the 524th Bombardment Squadron receiving the first examples.  The type flew its first combat mission in late 2001 when four planes flew nonstop to Khandahar, Afghanistan and back to Wurtsmith AFB for precision strikes on Taliban targets to begin the Afghanistan Offensive.

Currently, there are plans for 140 FB-119’s, though that number may be cut due to the plane’s cost and lack of perceived mission.  As of today, there are three squadrons equipped with the plane, including the training wing at Whiteman AFB.

(The model is a 1/48 Monogram F-19 scale-o-ramaed into a 1/72 bomber.  The cockpit and canopy came from an F-111, with the back part of the canopy coming from an A-6 (with plenty of putty).  The forward gear came from the afore mentioned F-111)



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Offline anthonyp

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« Reply #28 on: July 01, 2007, 08:05:38 pm »
Quote

Simple answer to the engine problem would be to replace the XT40s with T54s, produced by Allison rebuilding the XT40s using T56 parts where ever possible (essentially, that's what he T54 was supposed to have been).  Simple and yields a very functional design for this purpose.

Gorgeous model there, Anthony.
Speciba, Tovarish Evan!  But I have not yet truly enlightened the board until I have let... HIM out...

And now, the final planes....  the GLORIOUS Soviet Union!

COMRADES!!!!!

It is I, Anatoly, returned from what seems to be a hibernation caused by either too much or lack of Vodka.

I am here today to present two additions to the GLORIOUS Soviet Union's might air forces!  These planes drove the running dog West into hiding, like the shivering chihuahuas they are!

Hmmm, it appears I am a bit rusty at driving the masses into a frothing at the mouth, rabid embrace of Socialist ideals.  Perhaps some Vodka (sip)...  perhaps some more Vodka (glug).... perhaps MORE Vodka (splash heard, sounding suspiciously like someone diving head first into a vodka tank).

Thash it (hic) Tovarisheshesh...  We can now make those (hic) those (hic) those guys, yeah, them, run and (hic) stuff when we fly theesh planes and stuff around!

ZA (hic) RODINA!!!!

Comrade Captain Anatoly Iosef Pakizorich, Naval Aviation Bureau



Soviet Navy L-39K

When the Soviets began to deploy their supercarriers, it became apparent that an on-board training aircraft was needed.  Various designs were studied, almost all Russian in origin, but the best solution was a cheap little training aircraft that was all over the Warsaw Pact:  The L-39 Albatross.

It was a simple matter to transform the land based L-39 into the naval L-39K, much simpler than what the USN was going through transforming the BAe Hawk into the T-45.  Much of this is due to fact that the USN has catapults on all ships, whereas the Soviet Union had begun to experiment with skijumps on their modified Kiev class light carriers (catapult launches could be experienced in any two-seat strike aircraft).

In addition to being a training aircraft, the L-39K could be fitted with rocket pods, small bombs, and light missiles to become impromptu light strike aircraft.

When the Soviet Union fell, a multitude of countries became L-39K operators, including Russia, the Ukraine, Germany (from East Germany), Poland, the Czech Republic, China, Vietnam, North Korea, Indonesia, India, and Socialist Ceylon.

(This is one of those 1/72 L-39 kits (I forget which), modded for carrier ops with some bits from other kits)



For more pics, click here.



Russian Yak-140 (export license build JH-7)

The Russians corporation Yakovlev began license build production of the Chinese JH-7, for use by both Russian and Ukranian forces, due to the sudden falling out of the sky by many Su-24’s.

While the Chinese plane was capable, it was nowhere near the bomber the Su-24 had been.  The 200 built were quickly replaced by rebuilt Su-24’s and new build Su-34’s.

The Yak-140 had the distinction of being one of only a handful of aircraft capable of carrying the massive AS-11.

(This is a Trumpeter 1/72 FBC-1/JH-7 kit, with decals and weapons from a Su-24.  Easy to build kit, really).



For more pics, click here.
I exist to pi$$ others off!!!
My categorized models directory on my site.
My site (currently with no model links).
"Build what YOU like, the way YOU want to." - a wise man

Offline anthonyp

  • aka Captain Obvious
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« Reply #29 on: July 01, 2007, 08:06:28 pm »
Ok, I'm finally done with posting models.  That clears out THAT backlong... now, I gotta finish up those 35+ kits on the bench...

 :cheers:  :cheers:

EDIT:

Erm, whoops...  I forgot one.

USN AV-8N Sea Harrier

This is the US license built version of the Sea Harrier, using indigenous electronics, mainly.  It was acquired to fly off the US's ASW carriers and sea control ships, as well as an interim fighter for use off of the thru-deck cruisers and destroyers in use.

This particular example is from the USS Intrepid, an ASW carrier, in the late 70's.  It provides air defense for the fighter with two AIM-9's and two AIM-7's.

The AV-8N has been replaced in front-line fleet squadrons by the FV-12.  Most AV-8N's can be found either in reserve units, or in the air arms of other nations.



For more pics, click here.

And now, THAT's IT!!   :dum:

 :cheers:  :cheers:  
« Last Edit: July 01, 2007, 08:16:31 pm by anthonyp »
I exist to pi$$ others off!!!
My categorized models directory on my site.
My site (currently with no model links).
"Build what YOU like, the way YOU want to." - a wise man