Author Topic: De Havilland Sea Venom  (Read 4623 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline PR19_Kit

  • Closeted Take That fan
  • What-IF SIG
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 26141
  • Whiffing since the 70s
Re: De Havilland Sea Venom
« Reply #45 on: January 25, 2017, 02:24:26 pm »
Could a Griffon work inverted, like the DB600 series of engines?

Stupid question Spackman, of COURSE it could, this being Whiffworld.  :banghead:  ;D ;)
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

Offline kitnut617

  • That's got his tum rumbling already just by the sound of it.
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 10055
Re: De Havilland Sea Venom
« Reply #46 on: January 25, 2017, 05:40:28 pm »
My idea behind this design was to have inverted V-12's



So was this, two in the rear fuselage. Front one connected to the front prop by drive shaft, the rear prop right off the rear engine



If I'm not building models, I'm out riding my dirtbike

Offline Captain Canada

  • "but this time it's different. I was drunk when I agreed to it."
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 28550
Re: De Havilland Sea Venom
« Reply #47 on: January 25, 2017, 05:57:37 pm »
Nice ! Does look good in the dark naval colours  :wub:
CANADA KICKS arse !!!!

Long Live the Commonwealth !!!
Vive les Canadiens !
Where's my beer ?

Offline PR19_Kit

  • Closeted Take That fan
  • What-IF SIG
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 26141
  • Whiffing since the 70s
Re: De Havilland Sea Venom
« Reply #48 on: January 26, 2017, 12:25:27 am »
Some good looking stuff there Robert.  :thumbsup:

Is that a turboprop F-86D I see in the background too?
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

Offline kitnut617

  • That's got his tum rumbling already just by the sound of it.
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 10055
Re: De Havilland Sea Venom
« Reply #49 on: January 26, 2017, 02:13:06 am »
Some good looking stuff there Robert.  :thumbsup:

Is that a turboprop F-86D I see in the background too?

Thanks Kit --- the F-86D is my RR "Crecy" engine powered fighter. It would be an 'X' configured engine of 24 cylinders which (according to the RR book on the Crecy) was theoretically an 8000 hp engine so needed an airframe that could handle that power. The F-86D was powered by an 8000 lbt engine and the book says -- with an efficient propeller, 1lb of thrust is about 1 hp
If I'm not building models, I'm out riding my dirtbike

Offline PR19_Kit

  • Closeted Take That fan
  • What-IF SIG
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 26141
  • Whiffing since the 70s
Re: De Havilland Sea Venom
« Reply #50 on: January 26, 2017, 02:21:29 am »
Can you imagine what an 8000 hp piston engine would sound like?  :o

That's got to have been awesome!
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

Offline Rheged

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 3628
  • Growing older is inevitable, growing up isn't!
Re: De Havilland Sea Venom
« Reply #51 on: January 26, 2017, 04:36:59 am »
Can you imagine what an 8000 hp piston engine would sound like?  :o

That's got to have been awesome!

A sound footprint larger than the aircraft range?   Maybe those "sound mirrors" on Romney Marsh would be some use after all......."Get ready chaps!! I can hear them taking off  in  Bordeaux!!"
"If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you....."
It  means that you read  the instruction sheet

Offline kitnut617

  • That's got his tum rumbling already just by the sound of it.
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 10055
Re: De Havilland Sea Venom
« Reply #52 on: January 26, 2017, 05:04:49 am »
Can you imagine what an 8000 hp piston engine would sound like?  :o

That's got to have been awesome!

It would have been a 2-Stroke too.  Mind you a lot of the noise would have been muted because the exhaust passed through an exhaust argumentor.
I'll try to do a drawing of it which will show the engine arangement, it would've looked like a turbine jet
« Last Edit: January 26, 2017, 05:07:05 am by kitnut617 »
If I'm not building models, I'm out riding my dirtbike

Offline steelpillow

  • Makes own decals
  • ***
  • Posts: 444
    • Guy's blocki
Re: De Havilland Sea Venom
« Reply #53 on: January 29, 2017, 05:13:10 am »
Thanks Kit --- the F-86D is my RR "Crecy" engine powered fighter. It would be an 'X' configured engine of 24 cylinders which (according to the RR book on the Crecy) was theoretically an 8000 hp engine so needed an airframe that could handle that power. The F-86D was powered by an 8000 lbt engine and the book says -- with an efficient propeller, 1lb of thrust is about 1 hp

The Crecy was not only a Diesel but a two-stroke sleeve-valve Diesel. At high speeds it was surprisingly fuel-efficient, which led to the realisation that to give an aircraft with a decent range the Crecy was a better bet than Whittle's thirsty jet. I would suggest that if de Havilland's Major Halford had not come good with the Goblin, the utter messes that were R-R and Rover's favoured first-generation jets would have meant that the Crecy might well have gone into production a couple of years later. Wonder how the Crecy would fit in the back end of a Vampire/Venom?
Cheers.

Offline kitnut617

  • That's got his tum rumbling already just by the sound of it.
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 10055
Re: De Havilland Sea Venom
« Reply #54 on: January 29, 2017, 06:58:46 am »
Thanks Kit --- the F-86D is my RR "Crecy" engine powered fighter. It would be an 'X' configured engine of 24 cylinders which (according to the RR book on the Crecy) was theoretically an 8000 hp engine so needed an airframe that could handle that power. The F-86D was powered by an 8000 lbt engine and the book says -- with an efficient propeller, 1lb of thrust is about 1 hp

The Crecy was not only a Diesel but a two-stroke sleeve-valve Diesel. At high speeds it was surprisingly fuel-efficient, which led to the realisation that to give an aircraft with a decent range the Crecy was a better bet than Whittle's thirsty jet. I would suggest that if de Havilland's Major Halford had not come good with the Goblin, the utter messes that were R-R and Rover's favoured first-generation jets would have meant that the Crecy might well have gone into production a couple of years later. Wonder how the Crecy would fit in the back end of a Vampire/Venom?

The Crecy was not a diesel, it was a 2-stroke, sleeve valve though and it used 150 octane av-gas. The large supercharger feed just compressed air through the inlet ports and the fuel was directly injected into the combustion chamber.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2017, 07:03:23 am by kitnut617 »
If I'm not building models, I'm out riding my dirtbike

Offline PR19_Kit

  • Closeted Take That fan
  • What-IF SIG
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 26141
  • Whiffing since the 70s
Re: De Havilland Sea Venom
« Reply #55 on: January 29, 2017, 08:14:23 am »
The Napier Nomad was a 2 stroke super AND turbo charged diesel.

It sounds like RR and Napier were on similar tacks there.
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

Offline steelpillow

  • Makes own decals
  • ***
  • Posts: 444
    • Guy's blocki
Re: De Havilland Sea Venom
« Reply #56 on: February 01, 2017, 02:03:24 pm »
The Crecy was not a diesel, it was a 2-stroke, sleeve valve though and it used 150 octane av-gas. The large supercharger feed just compressed air through the inlet ports and the fuel was directly injected into the combustion chamber.

I stand corrected. Serves me right for posting on an R-R engine after reading about Napier.

Mind you, the Crecy was almost a Diesel. Harry Ricardo had long been a proponent of the diesel. But the Crecy would be all about sprint power and avgas was the stuff. His own single-cylinder E44 engine, which he used for research, had to be converted to run on gasoline for the Crecy work. Rolls had one too and did the same to theirs.

A 24-cylinder Nomad would have been really something! Napier had done 24 with the Sabre so it wouldn't be hard. Would so love to whiff one in say 1:8 scale.

Dear Santa, all I ask is a 3D software package, some CAD source files, a 3D printer and the brains to use them...
Cheers.