Author Topic: DONE +++ 1:72 Temco YT2T-1 "Buckskin"; NATC, Patuxent River, 1960  (Read 3709 times)

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Offline sandiego89

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Fantastic Dizzy.

-Dave
Dave "Sandiego89"
Chesapeake, Virginia, USA

Offline Captain Canada

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Wow....so good already !

 :thumbsup:
CANADA KICKS arse !!!!

Long Live the Commonwealth !!!
Vive les Canadiens !
Where's my beer ?

Online PR19_Kit

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Do you EVER sleep Thomas?  ;) ;D
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

Offline DogfighterZen

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Looking great! :thumbsup:
"Sticks and stones may break some bones but a 3.57's gonna blow your damn head off!!"

Offline Flyer

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 :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
Everything is theoretically impossible, until it is done. -Robert A. Heinlein

Offline Dizzyfugu

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After the end of day #4, the kit is almost finished. Detail painting was done, as well as decals and even a coat of glossy varnish could be applied. Today some very small final things have to be done (e. g. inserting the seats and some touch-ups in the cockpit, clear paint on the position lights), but I might get the complete package ready for the deadline.  ;D


Offline Dizzyfugu

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...and it's finished - a bit hurried, in just four and a half days, but 2:45 before the chequered flag comes out!  ;D


1:72 Temco Model 63 YT2T-1 'Buckskin', U.S. Navy “13/S (BuNo. 133929)", assigned to the Naval Air Test Center (NATC); Patuxent River, 1960 (Whif/Special Hobby TT-1 conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Temco Model 63 YT2T-1 'Buckskin', U.S. Navy “13/S (BuNo. 133929)", assigned to the Naval Air Test Center (NATC); Patuxent River, 1960 (Whif/Special Hobby TT-1 conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Temco Model 63 YT2T-1 'Buckskin', U.S. Navy “13/S (BuNo. 133929)", assigned to the Naval Air Test Center (NATC); Patuxent River, 1960 (Whif/Special Hobby TT-1 conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


Some background:
The Temco Model 63 "Buckskin" trainer was designed by Texas Engineering & Manufacturing Company (TEMCO) as a private venture to replace the US Navy's piston-engine, land-based Beech Model B45 'Mentor' primary trainers in the mid 1960ies, but with better performance and more likeliness to modern jet fighters.
The Model 63’s forerunner, the Temco Model 51, had been initially proposed to the US Air Force in response to an Air Force competition for a jet-powered primary trainer, which was eventually won by the Cessna T-37 Tweet. A small number of the Model 51 were built and put into service, powered by a Continental Motors J69-T-9 (a license-built Turbomeca Marboré) jet engine and officially designated TT-1 ‘Pinto, but only saw a limited career.

1:72 Temco Model 63 YT2T-1 'Buckskin', U.S. Navy “13/S (BuNo. 133929)", assigned to the Naval Air Test Center (NATC); Patuxent River, 1960 (Whif/Special Hobby TT-1 conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Temco Model 63 YT2T-1 'Buckskin', U.S. Navy “13/S (BuNo. 133929)", assigned to the Naval Air Test Center (NATC); Patuxent River, 1960 (Whif/Special Hobby TT-1 conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


Like the Pinto, the Model 63 was a mid-wing, tricycle landing gear trainer with an enclosed cockpit. What made the Model 63 unusual was a pull/push tandem engine arrangement, similar to the Cessna 336/337 that was under development at the same time. The Temco Model 63 was driven by two small Turbomeca Bastan IV turboprop engines, each developing 650 shp (485 kW).

The rationale behind this layout were the compact dimensions, actually, the aircraft was not bigger than the single engine TT-1. Studies undertaken during the early design stages had shown that a classic layout with wing-mounted engines would have necessitated a considerably higher wing span and a longer fuselage, too. Another benefit was the improved safety of two engines, esp. during envisioned long navigation flights over the open sea, and the Bastan engines gave the Model 63 the ability to fly safely even with one of the engines shut down.

1:72 Temco Model 63 YT2T-1 'Buckskin', U.S. Navy “13/S (BuNo. 133929)", assigned to the Naval Air Test Center (NATC); Patuxent River, 1960 (Whif/Special Hobby TT-1 conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Temco Model 63 YT2T-1 'Buckskin', U.S. Navy “13/S (BuNo. 133929)", assigned to the Naval Air Test Center (NATC); Patuxent River, 1960 (Whif/Special Hobby TT-1 conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr



Compared with the TT-1’s small jet engine, the propellers gave the Model 63 a better responsiveness to pilot input and the turboprop engines offered a very good fuel economy, while enabling almost the same performance as the single jet precursor. Furthermore, the two engines gave instructors the option to simulate different flight regimes, while the tandem arrangement helped avoid torque and asymmetrical thrust issues. Besides, the T2T was equipped with many of the same features found in contemporary operational jets, including ejection seats, liquid oxygen equipment, speed brakes, along with typical flight controls and instrument panels.

Anyway, the unusual layout came at a price: it necessitated a totally different tail section with twin tail booms and a single, high stabilizer connecting them at the tips of the fins. Despite familiar outlines, only parts of the TT's outer wings and the cockpit could be used on the Model 63 - the rest had to be re-designed and/or strengthened, so that the aircraft's overall weight became markedly higher than the TT's. Despite this drawback, officials became interested enough in the turboprop trainer program to procure a pre-series for trials and direct comparison with jet- and piston-engine alternatives.

The aircraft received the official designation T2T. Like the Pinto, the T2T was intended as a primary trainer, so it carried no internal armament but could be outfitted with wing tip tanks and had two underwing hardpoints for 500 lb each, placed outside of the strengthened landing gear. These hardpoints were reserved for auxiliary tanks, cargo boxes, smoke generators or camera pods.

The first XT2T maiden flight took place in summer 1959. Flight characteristics were considered good, and, compared with the earlier TT-1, the machine was not as underpowered (which was a problem during landing abortions and touch-and-go manoeuvers). After initial tests with two more prototypes in summer 1960, a batch of five YT2T-1 pre-production aircraft, which were updated to the intended serial production standard and incorporated some minor modifications, was ordered and directly sent to the Naval Air Test Center (NATC) Patuxent River.

1:72 Temco Model 63 YT2T-1 'Buckskin', U.S. Navy “13/S (BuNo. 133929)", assigned to the Naval Air Test Center (NATC); Patuxent River, 1960 (Whif/Special Hobby TT-1 conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Temco Model 63 YT2T-1 'Buckskin', U.S. Navy “13/S (BuNo. 133929)", assigned to the Naval Air Test Center (NATC); Patuxent River, 1960 (Whif/Special Hobby TT-1 conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


Results were generally positive, so that a further batch of 24 aircraft were produced as T2T-1s between 1962 and 1963. These aircraft served in the Air Training Command at Pensacola, Florida and used in a training program demonstration testing the feasibility of using jet- and turboprop-powered trainer for primary flight training.

The tests were not conclusive, though, and no further T2Ts ordered. The 'Buckskin', how the aircraft was christened unofficially, was pleasant to fly and offered very good performance. But the aircraft was – esp. for its limited role – complex. Maintenance costs were high, and the authorities were never really happy about the French engines on board of the home-grown trainer type.

1:72 Temco Model 63 YT2T-1 'Buckskin', U.S. Navy “13/S (BuNo. 133929)", assigned to the Naval Air Test Center (NATC); Patuxent River, 1960 (Whif/Special Hobby TT-1 conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


The US Navy liked the turboprop engine, though, but wanted a less complex aircraft. This eventually materialized in the early Seventies with the T-34C Turbo-Mentor. After a production hiatus of almost 15 years, the Beech Model 45 returned, powered by a Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-25 turboprop engine. Mentor production restarted in 1975 for deliveries of T-34Cs to the USN and of the T-34C-1 armed version for export customers in 1977, this version featuring four underwing hardpoints. Since the late 1970s, T-34Cs have been used by the Naval Air Training Command to train numerous Naval Aviators and Naval Flight Officers for the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Coast Guard, and numerous NATO and Allied nations - and the small T2T fleet was phased out by 1979.




General characteristics:
    Crew: two
    Length: 32 ft 7 in (9.93 m)
    Wingspan (incl. tip tanks): 29 ft 10 in (9.09 m)
    Height: 8 ft 1 1/2 in (2.48 m)
    Wing area: 150 sq ft (13.9 m2)
    Empty weight: 2,848 lb (1,292 kg)
    Loaded weight: 5,400 lb (2,448 kg)

Powerplant:
   2× Turbomeca Bastan IV turboprop engines, rated at 650 shp (485 kW) each

Performance:
    Maximum speed: 345 mph (300 knots, 556 km/h) at 15,000 ft (4,600 m)
    Never exceed speed: 518 mph (450 knots, 834 km/h)
    Cruise speed: 247 mph (215 knots, 398 km/h) at 25,000 ft (7,600 m)
    Stall speed: 69 mph (60 knots, 111 km/hr)
    Endurance: 2.5 hr
    Service ceiling: 30,000 ft (9,145 m)
    Rate of climb: 1,900 ft/min (9.7 m/s)

Armament:
    2x underwing hardpoints for a total load of up to 1.000 lb (454 kg)
    2x optional wing tip tanks



1:72 Temco Model 63 YT2T-1 'Buckskin', U.S. Navy “13/S (BuNo. 133929)", assigned to the Naval Air Test Center (NATC); Patuxent River, 1960 (Whif/Special Hobby TT-1 conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Temco Model 63 YT2T-1 'Buckskin', U.S. Navy “13/S (BuNo. 133929)", assigned to the Naval Air Test Center (NATC); Patuxent River, 1960 (Whif/Special Hobby TT-1 conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Temco Model 63 YT2T-1 'Buckskin', U.S. Navy “13/S (BuNo. 133929)", assigned to the Naval Air Test Center (NATC); Patuxent River, 1960 (Whif/Special Hobby TT-1 conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Temco Model 63 YT2T-1 'Buckskin', U.S. Navy “13/S (BuNo. 133929)", assigned to the Naval Air Test Center (NATC); Patuxent River, 1960 (Whif/Special Hobby TT-1 conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr



An odd creation, and taking into account the four and a half days time frame from sprues to beauty pics (including background research and text), as well as the body work involved in the building process with the new front engine and the tail booms, I am quite happy with the result. Could have been better, sure, but it was finished in time, just as planned/hoped for. ;)

Anyway, the T2T looks interesting; my build slightly differs from the benchmark CG renditions, but remains true to Stéphane Beaumort’s basic idea. Cheers!

Offline Knightflyer

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Re: DONE +++ 1:72 Temco YT2T-1 "Buckskin"; NATC, Patuxent River, 1960
« Reply #24 on: September 14, 2016, 12:21:15 pm »
As always Dizzy - a fantastic build  ;D
Probably spent more time than is healthy painting a Bear's bottom!

Offline DogfighterZen

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Re: DONE +++ 1:72 Temco YT2T-1 "Buckskin"; NATC, Patuxent River, 1960
« Reply #25 on: September 14, 2016, 12:54:28 pm »
As always Dizzy - a fantastic build  ;D

And even more when it's done in less than 5 days...  :bow:

:cheers:
"Sticks and stones may break some bones but a 3.57's gonna blow your damn head off!!"

Offline Flyer

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Re: DONE +++ 1:72 Temco YT2T-1 "Buckskin"; NATC, Patuxent River, 1960
« Reply #26 on: September 14, 2016, 01:57:02 pm »
 :wub: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
Everything is theoretically impossible, until it is done. -Robert A. Heinlein

Offline Old Wombat

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Re: DONE +++ 1:72 Temco YT2T-1 "Buckskin"; NATC, Patuxent River, 1960
« Reply #27 on: September 14, 2016, 02:22:28 pm »
Another excellent build, Dizzy! :thumbsup:




And you stretched the build out to 41/2 days, just to make us all feel better: How sweet! :wacko:
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Offline Captain Canada

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Re: DONE +++ 1:72 Temco YT2T-1 "Buckskin"; NATC, Patuxent River, 1960
« Reply #28 on: September 14, 2016, 08:05:34 pm »
That was quick ! lol Great job !
CANADA KICKS arse !!!!

Long Live the Commonwealth !!!
Vive les Canadiens !
Where's my beer ?

Offline Dizzyfugu

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Re: DONE +++ 1:72 Temco YT2T-1 "Buckskin"; NATC, Patuxent River, 1960
« Reply #29 on: September 14, 2016, 11:41:09 pm »
Thank you very much, everyone, and glad you like it despite some weaknesses.
I must admit that this one was truly hurried, a build like terrain-following penetration flight with low margin for error.

But The Force was with me!  ;)