Author Topic: Il-28 Seabeagle  (Read 5608 times)

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Offline NARSES2

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Re: Il-28 Seabeagle
« Reply #75 on: March 03, 2016, 06:31:04 am »
We have 3 infant/junior, 2 senior and 1 naughty boys and girls school within 3/4 mile. The local roads are horrendous from 8 until 9 and as a pedestrian you cannot cross  :banghead: Even I use the Lollipop Man  ;D Joke is some mums have to walk back farther from where they park than it is from home to school in the first place !  :blink:
Decals my @r$e!

Offline chrisonord

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Re: Il-28 Seabeagle
« Reply #76 on: March 03, 2016, 01:23:16 pm »
What propellers are you going to use on this please, Zenrat?
Chris
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If you cant eat it hump it or fight it,
Pee on it and walk away!!

Offline zenrat

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Re: Il-28 Seabeagle
« Reply #77 on: March 04, 2016, 12:39:54 am »
I have a pair (or should that be 2 pair?) of white metal Spitfire contra-props very kindly donated by NARSES2.
I fitted them today.
They just touch the ground.
However, putting the wheels on will give me enough clearance.
I also painted the parts of the glazing that are underside colour and fitted the tail turret.
Fred

Another ill conceived, poorly thought out, crudely executed and badly painted piece of what-if modelling muppetry from zenrat industries.


Offline zenrat

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Re: Il-28 Seabeagle
« Reply #78 on: March 04, 2016, 11:23:12 pm »
Heres a badly out of focus phone pic of where I got to today.
Glazing is mostly attached and wheels are on.


Fred

Another ill conceived, poorly thought out, crudely executed and badly painted piece of what-if modelling muppetry from zenrat industries.


Offline Old Wombat

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Re: Il-28 Seabeagle
« Reply #79 on: March 05, 2016, 05:46:03 am »
From what I can see in the mists it looks pretty good! :thumbsup:
Has a life outside of What-If & wishes it would stop interfering!

"The purpose of all War is Peace" - St. Augustine

veritas ad mortus veritas est

Offline zenrat

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Re: Il-28 Seabeagle
« Reply #80 on: March 06, 2016, 01:58:24 am »
Thanks Womby.
Today a wheel fell off but I caught it and put it back on.
It gained an anti glare panel and I attached the bomb bay doors and the first 3 U/C doors.
Also worked on the missile loading trailer and decided to replace the torpedo I was intending to carry in the bomb bay with a Tsunami Bomb.
Fred

Another ill conceived, poorly thought out, crudely executed and badly painted piece of what-if modelling muppetry from zenrat industries.


Offline Captain Canada

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Re: Il-28 Seabeagle
« Reply #81 on: March 06, 2016, 05:24:02 am »
Not a great pic but it's really upping the suspense ! Looks great !

 :cheers:
CANADA KICKS arse !!!!

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Offline zenrat

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Re: Il-28 Seabeagle
« Reply #82 on: March 07, 2016, 01:08:38 am »
I find dodgy blurred pictures at this stage of a build add a touch of suspense to the whole proceedings.

It now has all the U/C doors fitted and I also attached the canopy and the weapons operators hatch.
After checking my references I then removed the canopy and reattached it this time hinging it on the correct side.
Basic gluing together is completed now apart from the hatch/steps for the bloke in the sun-room down at the back and the weapons load.
Fred

Another ill conceived, poorly thought out, crudely executed and badly painted piece of what-if modelling muppetry from zenrat industries.


Offline zenrat

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Re: Il-28 Seabeagle
« Reply #83 on: March 14, 2016, 03:06:59 am »
The actual build here was finished today with a lick of wash on the tip tanks.
However, as I built it with all the doors open (as it were) I am building some crew access ladders to pose with it plus i've only hung one missile on its pylons with the other being loaded from a trailer.  And that trailer needs a tow vehicle which I am working on.
I've also got some little men to paint who will be the ground crew and some of the aircrew.
Fred

Another ill conceived, poorly thought out, crudely executed and badly painted piece of what-if modelling muppetry from zenrat industries.


Offline zenrat

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Re: Il-28 Seabeagle
« Reply #84 on: March 18, 2016, 04:39:44 am »
All 3 access ladders are now finished as is the trailer carrying the second missile.
The tow vehicle is coming along and the little men are undergoing painting.  Shouldn't be too long.
Hopefully sooner rathe than later as the back story is getting longer by the day and at this rate is in danger of becoming a novella.
Fred

Another ill conceived, poorly thought out, crudely executed and badly painted piece of what-if modelling muppetry from zenrat industries.


Offline PR19_Kit

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Re: Il-28 Seabeagle
« Reply #85 on: March 18, 2016, 06:22:49 am »

....... and at this rate is in danger of becoming a novella.


And that's wrong?  :unsure:
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

Offline zenrat

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Re: Il-28 Seabeagle
« Reply #86 on: March 20, 2016, 02:27:58 am »
Very very wrong.  Believe me...

More paint on the little men today plus more work on the tow vehicle.
Fred

Another ill conceived, poorly thought out, crudely executed and badly painted piece of what-if modelling muppetry from zenrat industries.


Offline zenrat

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Re: Il-28 Seabeagle
« Reply #87 on: March 26, 2016, 05:04:15 pm »
Finally, some pictures...

Ilyushin Il-28 PLVT

First flown in 1948 the Ilyushin Il-28 tactical bomber made its first public appearance (at Uncle Joe’s insistence) in the 1950 May Day flypast over Red Square.
In October of that year the People’s Democratic Republic of Victoria became the first foreign air force to operate the Il-28 and by mid ’51 a “volunteer” squadron was flying missions over Korea escorted by PDRV Republican Guard “advisors” flying top cover in MiG 15s.
Following the end of the Korean War in ’52 PDRV Air Command initiated a programme of upgrades and modifications based on feedback, experience and lessons learned.  The resulting aircraft were designated Il-28V1 with a later upgrade to V2 being started in ’57 followed by V3 spec in 1960.
The V3 upgrade was however only an interim measure as local manufacture of upgraded Il-28s began in ’61 using Victorian built engines, avionics and weapons.

Initially three versions were built;
Il-28V4 tactical bomber.  James G74 engines.  Nhill Power Radar BR18 Quoll Bombing Radar.
Il-28RV4 long range reconnaissance.  James G76 engines.  Tail turret deleted. Bomb bay mounted mission specific recce pods.
Il-28PLV4 maritime strike.  James G74 engines.  Nhill Power Radar MR7 Ningaui Maritime Radar.   Could carry two Watson Foxen ASF04 radar homing anti ship missiles on the underwing pylons plus two Carter Caviroc Mk2 supercavitating rocket propelled torpedos in the bomb bay.
All V4s had the underwing pylons plumbed for long range tanks.
Semi officially adopting the NATO reporting name these aircraft were named the Bombeagle, Spybeagle and Seabeagle respectively.
The Victorian built aircraft proved to be competent and reliable and did everything asked of them soldiering on well into the 1970s.  In a repeat of the events of the early 50’s “volunteers” went to Vietnam in ’67 where they operated PLV4s against British and US naval vessels in the Gulf of Tonkin.  The Foxen ASMs proved too easily jammed but Cavirocs were very effective provided the Seabeagles came in low enough.

One Spybeagle crew were persuaded to offer their services to the NVA and, with a Soviet SAM radar system mounted in the bomb bay carried out “antiweasel” missions attempting to lure US Wild Weasels into ambushes.  Whether or not this was successful remains classified but the aircraft did return to Victoria and can be seen (minus the SAM radar) at the People’s Aviation Museum at Dadswell Bridge.
By the mid 70’s the V4s were obsolete and were withdrawn from frontline service.  All Bombeagles and most of the Spybeagles were either sold or broken up.  The Seabeagles and the remaining Spybeagles however got a new lease of life as propeller aircraft.
The James G7 series of jet engines, while having an adequate power output and being reliable and easy to maintain did like a drink.  This limited the range of the V4s to a little over 2800km.  However, since 1961 Turboprop development had progressed in leaps and bounds culminating in 1975 with the release to service of the Hanson Pademelon series of engines.
Designed from the outset for economical cruise performance Pademelons were the catalyst to turning Seabeagles into long range patrol planes.
23 Seabeagles (and 4 Spybeagles) were stripped down and rebuilt being upgraded to Il-28PLVT Seabeagles (and Il-28RVT Spybeagles).   The James engines were replaced with Hanson Pademelon T013 turboprops driving contra rotating propellers.  The exhaust nozzles of these engines were hydraulically rotated through 45 degrees to provide additional take off lift.  All avionics were upgraded and a NPR MSR13 Dunnart Maritime Search Radar fitted.  The bomb bays were plumbed to enable additional tankage to be carried.  In their new roles rough field use was not considered to be required meaning smaller diameter main wheels could be utilised.  Nose gear remained the same.
Upgrades to the Spybeagles were identical except that no military equipment was fitted (they had already had the tail turrets deleted) and the bomb bays were faired over and permanently filled with fuel cells.
The remaining Seabeagles (and 4 Spybeagles) were mothballed to be used for spares for the operational aircraft.
These upgrades resulted in an aircraft with a reduced maximum speed (800 km/hr – down from 900km/hr for the PLV4), higher service ceiling (13,200m – up from 12,000m for the PLV4) and a range which, if using bomb bay tanks and underwing tanks was more then doubled to 7,500km (5,300km with a full weapons load).
The four upgraded Spybeagles were handed over to the Victorian Cetacean Institute who used them for oceanographic research in the Southern Ocean (including the tracking of illegal Japanese whalers for termination by others) until 1997.

The PLVT Seabeagles were operated by the PDRV Navy patrolling Victoria’s Maritime borders and approaches.  Normal patrols were made unarmed but in times of crisis aircraft would be armed with a variety of weapons such as anti ship missiles, torpedoes, depth charges and bombs (the latter 3 either conventional or nuclear).
It was during such a time of crisis that the aircraft modelled (AH-108 “Trouble” of the PDRV Naval Air Wing 23rd Maritime Search and Destroy Regiment) brought an abrupt end to what became known as the NotAWar between Victoria and New Zealand.
26th April 1979 and tensions were high between the People’s Democratic Republic of Victoria and British New Zealand (due to the usual areas of friction between the two – Rugby, thong tariffs and inappropriate sheep jokes).  Ambassadors had been withdrawn, nationals of the opposing nation had been rounded up into internment camps, trade shipments had been seized and aircraft patrolling the Tasman Sea were doing so armed.
Trouble, piloted by Technical Officer (Flight) Morgan and named after her dog Hazel was carrying a Watson Swiften ASJ03 ASM under each wing and a Carter Mk 2 Tsunami Bomb in the bomb bay.  The Swiften, developed from the Foxen was an ultra long range radar and TV guided missile with a conventional warhead while the Tsunami Bomb was a thermonuclear weapon in the multi megaton range with a pressure trigger which would detonate it at the appropriate depth (based on sea conditions, depth and distance from the target and then set by the Weapons Officer before release) to cause a massive wave sufficient to swamp and capsize enemy vessels.

Trouble was two hours into a 6 hour patrol flying a zero electronic emissions profile to its patrol area when TO(F) Morgan dropped below the cloud base (Which was at about 3,500m) to find, to her surprise, a naval battle group five kilometres to her left.
Accounts of what happened next vary.
Commander of the Imperial British New Zealand Colonial Navy battle group, Rear Admiral Sir Ivor McButtokrak RN claims in his memoir “I can’t possibly be held responsible for that, it wasn’t my fault, and I was nowhere near there at the time anyway” that his battle group was running under radio silence without active radar and with no air cover in order to remain stealthy and so were unaware of Trouble until it dropped from the clouds.
“It was standard operating procedure to run silent and of course you can’t fly planes without using the radar or radio can you?  When the events in question occurred I was obviously on the bridge of my flagship the HMBNZS Dave Dobbin (Waka Taua class carrier) and any suggestions I was resting in my day cabin with a young Ensign will be passed on to my solicitor.  My portside bridge lookout reported an aircraft heading directly for us and then immediately added that it was firing missiles.  I reacted as my standing orders required me to do when under attack from an enemy aircraft and gave the order to open fire with all anti aircraft weaponry and to launch the aircraft on the catapults”.
“The fact that these aircraft were not fighters (they were an unarmed Fairey Gannet COD aircraft and a Supermarine Spectre carrying ASW torpedoes) was not my fault.  We were not told to expect enemy air patrols and my valet had to get my dress uniform to the dry cleaners.  Anyway when they saw the planes launch they ran away so they did their job didn’t they?”

The crew of Trouble have a different recollection as they told me when I interviewed them on the 25th anniversary of the NotAWar.
“I saw all the ships as soon as we got out of the clouds” reported TO(F) Morgan.  “I couldn’t believe my eyes.  I maintained distance from the big flat top and just stared at them for about five minutes while I identified them.  I had to double check in the big blue book (shipping ID data was issued to aircrew in large blue ring binders).  I couldn’t believe we’d surprised a Waka.  Even then I doubted myself as they just sat there doing nothing.   Our orders were to only break radio silence if we sighted a significant foreign military asset so I reported to base what I was looking at.  I thought using the radio might wake them up, but no - no response.  They still just sat there.”
“After asking me if I was sure about what I was looking at base told me to ping them with the radar to get a happy snap, maintain my distance and observe.  If provoked I was to launch and run.  I asked for permission to use Plan Z (dropping the Tsunami) but was denied”.

Trouble’s weapons operator Technical Officer (Technical) McGuire “swept them with the radar two or three times and they sat there for what seemed like another ten minutes until all-together every radar in the fleet lit up.  The Seabeagle WeapOps had no side windows so I couldn’t see visually what was happening apart from the occasional tracer round flashing past the glazed nose”.
Rear Gunner Technician 2nd Class (Weapons) Manning had a grandstand view.  “I was sleeping off the previous days Anzac Day beers at the back there in the outhouse when the usual bells and whistles woke me as they realized we were there.  They then just opened up at us with everything they had.  Obviously most of it fell short but some of the bigger stuff was coming close.  Funny thing about their SAMs though.  They’d fire them at us but then their own CIWS would shoot them down before they got too far from the ships.  Odd that.  We’d been briefed that they had this new system that they’d bought off the seppos.  Maybe they’d wired it up backwards?”
“Anyway, I was just thinking that it was getting a bit hairy and they were gonna luck into a hit when I saw their cats throwing off a couple of planes so I told The Boss and she turned away from them, stuck us back up into the cloud and firewalled the throttles”.
  “As soon as Manno woke up from his nap and reported they’d launched I told Macca to lob both Swiftens at them”.
  “Which I did.  The beauty of the Swiftens was that you could slave them so while you steered one in the other flew parallel to it at a set distance.  Back then no-one had worked out how to jam our TV link either.  Default slave distance was 50m so I left that as was, stared into my little black and white telly and flew down and just skimmed in at wave top height.  It was totally unopposed.  Whatever was up with their phalanx just let me fly those babies straight in unopposed.  Badda Bang.  Lovely bit of kit they were.  Blew two big holes just above the waterline.  Obviously I couldn’t see that then as we were up in the murk but you’ve seen the press photos right?  Lovely job.  It was just like playing a video game.  Not that we had them back then but you know what I mean.  Who knew they put their fuel tanks there eh?”.
  “I knew, and you were supposed to.  Jeez Macca, what were you doing in tech briefings?”  Morgan shakes her head and rolls her eyes.  “So, after we’d launched we went home.  We never saw either of the planes they sent up.  We could hear a lot of panicked radio chatter but after a while they remembered to scramble it so we didn’t know that they’d turned back with the Dobbin under tow until we landed and were debriefed.  It was all luck really.  Luck and incompetence.  We could have dropped out of the clouds earlier or later and missed seeing them and they could have known what they were doing.  Never did find out what was up with the CIWS though.  Apparently someone told that pommy admiral (it wasn’t until the late 1980’s that the British Empire allowed colonies senior command positions in their own armed forces) that it was because they had bolted all the radar dishes on backwards.  And he believed them!”

The PLVT Seabeagles continued to patrol Victoria’s oceanic borders providing sterling service (with occasional minor technical upgrades) until the mid eighties when they were withdrawn from active service and eventually sold.
Trouble was restored to her 1979 specification and joined the “antiweasel” Spybeagle RV4 at Dadswell Bridge.  She is maintained in flying condition and can be seen to this day making low level passes directly over the crowds at airshows across Victoria.

The Model.
1/72 Italeri Ilyushin IL-28 Beagle with Airfix Rotodyne nacelles and white metal Spitfire contraprops courtesy of Narses2.  Radome is a 1/24 car spare wheel cover.  Missiles are kit/scratchbashed from various scale weapons parts and plastic card.  Yes, the wingfolds on the one on the trailer do work – hinges are 0.5mm wire in styrene tube.
Paint is car paint from a rattle can and Vallejo acrylic.  Decals are home made.

« Last Edit: March 27, 2016, 05:54:14 pm by zenrat »
Fred

Another ill conceived, poorly thought out, crudely executed and badly painted piece of what-if modelling muppetry from zenrat industries.


Offline NARSES2

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Re: Il-28 Seabeagle
« Reply #88 on: March 27, 2016, 06:06:22 am »
That is really good  :bow:
Decals my @r$e!

Offline Captain Canada

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Re: Il-28 Seabeagle
« Reply #89 on: March 27, 2016, 07:45:45 am »
Great stuff. Love the finished model, as well as all the equipment ! Great read as well, thanks for that !

 :bow:
CANADA KICKS arse !!!!

Long Live the Commonwealth !!!
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