Author Topic: World War One Whifs  (Read 11177 times)

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Offline nighthunter

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Re: World War One Whifs
« Reply #105 on: April 09, 2018, 09:38:23 am »
"Mind that bus." "What bus?" *SPLAT!*

Offline stevehed

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Re: World War One Whifs
« Reply #106 on: April 10, 2018, 04:22:52 pm »
Thanks Guys, appreciated. I remembered the Finnish SE5a and considered it for a while. Rejected it on the grounds of the overwing Lewis. Hadn't thought of staggered mgs. Or maybe an extra Maxim in between the cylinders like Guynemers cannon.

regards, Steve

Offline stevehed

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Re: World War One Whifs
« Reply #107 on: December 15, 2018, 01:19:18 pm »
My latest whif and entry in the ATF Whiff GB. It's a follow on from the previous Albatros D.VI back story. After cutting their teeth on the Albatros D.VI the LMA company designed a parasol observation aircraft based on the Hannover designs the company was building parts for. At least 35 aircraft were built during 1919 and they served with the Ukrainian(UNR) Air Force during 1919-20. After the Bolsheviks had defeated the White Forces in Southern Russia the Reds turned their attention to the Ukraine and Poland. Although eventually driven back from Poland the Ukraine was overrun and fell under Communist rule. The defeated UNR forces retreated into Czechoslovakia and Poland. What equipment remained was deemed unserviceable and scrapped. Although an LMA design the aircraft were known as Hannover Parasols. The first ten aircraft had the latest Mercedes engines but the remainder used former Austro Hungarian 225hp Austro Daimler engines from Czechoslovakia. As the Allied Commissioners drew nearer LMA moved over the border and merged with Avia, who were to become a major Czech aircraft manufacturer, and maintained a supply of engines, parts and aircraft to the Ukraine.

The donor kit is the Airfix Hannover CLIIIa. Being a monoplane I reckoned that the wing would need to be increased in span and chord. I had the remains of another upper wing from a previous Hannover kit bash and managed to get two sections 0.65ins, 12mm, wide which increased the span to 45ft. A length of .030 x .080 strip was cemented to the leading edge and blended in with filler to increase the chord. The other major change was to the tail unit. I removed the fin and rudder and replaced it with a modified half elevator from the Airfix Albatros D.V. The tail planes are remnants from the Airfix Bristol Fighter. The cabane struts are kit parts while the wing struts are .020 x .040 strip with rod dividers. The engine is the kit part re-modelled to look Austro Daimler by removing the exhausts and replacing with six individual pipes from a Roden Albatros. A Roden Gotha supplied a couple of bombs but the rest of the build was OOB. Build thread and I tweaked RCW history a little to create another future Whif area of operations.
https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/airfixtributeforum/2018-airfix-whiff-gb-stevehed-s-build-t52881.html






Regards, Steve

Offline NARSES2

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Re: World War One Whifs
« Reply #108 on: December 16, 2018, 05:59:15 am »
That is excellent. There is no way I would have recognised that you had started with the old Airfix Hanover.

Given a different engine/nose and possibly a slightly changed tail appendage I can see that in use during the early 30's with the Poles perhaps ?
Decals my @r$e!

Offline stevehed

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Re: World War One Whifs
« Reply #109 on: January 10, 2019, 12:00:54 pm »
Thanks Narses2. The Hannover kit has been a welcome surprise over the years and proved useful in five conversions to date. Of equal if not greater potential is the Airco DH4 and here is my second ATF entry for this year. It is the Airco DH4-3m and came about after I read that the DH4 airframe was ready by mid 1916 but the intended power plant, the 250hp Rolls Royce Eagle, wasn't available in sufficient numbers until the end of the year. The first DH4 squadron did not reach France until March 1917. But if a combination of the lower powered but readily available engines could produce a viable stop gap I'm sure the navy would have found a use for it after the Airco board outfoxed an attempt by a certain engine manufacturer to play politics. Here's the back story.

Airco’s attempts to create a viable multi engine version of the DH4 did not go down well with the engine manufacturers. Airco rightly argued that the 3m was a temporary stop gap and would not interfere with regular DH4 construction but one manufacturer in particular began to bend ears within the Air Ministry. Airco were “requested” to desist but the board of directors decided otherwise. The Admiralty were asked if they had a use for tri-engine patrol bomber to tide over the delays expected due to the late arrival of suitable engines for the DH4. After receiving an affirmative response two aircraft were despatched to RNAS Eastchurch for acceptance trials in mid September 1916. Another aircraft arrived in October and at the end of the month two machines were sent to RNAS Dunkirk. With a top speed of 85mph and the ability to carry 350lbs bomb load the navy decided that night bombing and anti submarine patrols were the roles best suited to the 3m. As masses of aircraft were never envisaged daylight raids with tight formations of 20 plus with mutually supporting defensive gunfire were never going to be an option. From Nov 16 to April 17 the 3m participated in raids against the Belgian U Boat bases and patrolled the sea lanes for submarine activity. Aircraft from Eastchurch twice forced enemy subs to dive and several attacks by Dunkirk aircraft are probably hidden within the plethora of references to twin engine aircraft which are recorded in U Boat reports and cannot be reconciled with the recorded activities of RNAS aircraft such as the Caudron GIV and Curtiss flying boats. The usual bomb load for anti sub patrols was 3 x 65lbs while the usual load on night raids against shore installations was 2 x 112lbs and 4 x 20lb Cooper bombs. Provision existed for a synchronized Vickers but it was never fitted and defensive armament was one or two Lewis guns mounted on a Scarff ring in the rear cockpit. Only eight aircraft were built and the last was written off in August 1917.
Build thread. https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/airfixtributeforum/2018-airfix-whiff-gb-stevehed-s-2nd-build-t52974.html





Regards, Steve

Offline zenrat

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Re: World War One Whifs
« Reply #110 on: January 11, 2019, 02:58:09 am »
Oooh yeah, very nice.

 :thumbsup:
Fred

Another ill conceived, lazily thought out, crudely executed and badly painted piece of half arsed what-if modelling muppetry from zenrat industries.

"...the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dreams with open eyes, to make it possible.”

Offline stevehed

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Re: World War One Whifs
« Reply #111 on: January 11, 2019, 04:30:41 am »
Thank you kindly.

Offline NARSES2

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Re: World War One Whifs
« Reply #112 on: January 11, 2019, 06:44:53 am »
Oh that is very nice  :thumbsup:

I can see that as a twin engined bomber with an extra gun position in front of the cockpit
Decals my @r$e!

Offline ericr

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Re: World War One Whifs
« Reply #113 on: January 11, 2019, 11:52:34 pm »

  :thumbsup: I like the three engine arrangement

Offline stevehed

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Re: World War One Whifs
« Reply #114 on: January 12, 2019, 05:18:35 am »
Thanks Gentlemen. The design definitely has more potential. A nose position is a must and I suppose the obvious choice would be to use the kit Eagles. This would give it a bit of poke and turn it into a mini Vimy. However, I'm going to have a rake through the spares to see if there is anything that could be used to look like a Hispano Suiza. Thinking along gunship lines similar to the Caudron R.11 which was used to escort Breguet 14 bomber formations.

Regards, Steve