Author Topic: Done: Fiat G.91R/2 '14-03' of Esc. 143, Ala de Caza 14; Spanish Air Force, 1975  (Read 3709 times)

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Offline Dizzyfugu

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Things become more concrete... Hard to tell but here a very light washing and some panel shading has been done. Colors look more pale, esp. the yellow-ish sand tone.

"One Week Group Build" at whatifmodelers.com No. 2: a Hispanic Gina by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


Close-up into the cockpit. Dashboard has been improved, the ejection seat (from the Revell Gina) has been dry-fitted.
The cockpit will be polulated by the OOB Airfix figure - probably the best piece of the whole kit!

"One Week Group Build" at whatifmodelers.com No. 2: a Hispanic Gina by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


No OOB decal was and could be used - 35 years took their toll! Anyway, the decals come primarily from a Heller Mirage III, as well as some additional stencils e .g. from a BAC Lightning (Xtradecal sheet) and many red stripes or the camera ports, which were cut from TL Modellbau decal stripes.

"One Week Group Build" at whatifmodelers.com No. 2: a Hispanic Gina by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

Offline Gondor

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Looking the business Dizzyfugu  :thumbsup:

Gondor
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Offline Dizzyfugu

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Thank you! :cheers:

Offline Dizzyfugu

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And here she is - any doubts that Spain did NOT use the Gina...?  :rolleyes:

1:72 Fiat G.91R/2; '14-03' of Escuadron 143, Ala de Caza 14; Spanish Air Force (SPAF/Ejército del Aire); Los Llanos/Albacete, 1975 (Whif/Airfix kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


Some background:
In December 1953, NATO Supreme Command issued specifications for a new light tactical support aircraft. European manufacturers were invited to submit their designs for this requested Light Weight Strike Fighter role. The G.91 was one contender and designed to this specification by the Italian engineer Giuseppe Gabrielli, hence the "G" designation.

1:72 Fiat G.91R/2; '14-03' of Escuadron 143, Ala de Caza 14; Spanish Air Force (SPAF/Ejército del Aire); Los Llanos/Albacete, 1975 (Whif/Airfix kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Fiat G.91R/2; '14-03' of Escuadron 143, Ala de Caza 14; Spanish Air Force (SPAF/Ejército del Aire); Los Llanos/Albacete, 1975 (Whif/Airfix kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


The competition was intended to produce an aircraft that was light, small, expendable, equipped with basic weapons and avionics and capable of operating with minimal ground support. These specifications were developed for two reasons: the first was the nuclear threat to large air bases, many cheaper aircraft could be better dispersed, and the other was to counter the trend towards larger and more expensive aircraft.

The technical requirements were:
• 1,100 m (3,610 ft) takeoff distance over a 15 m (49 ft) obstacle
• Capability to operate from grass strips and roads
• Maximum speed of Mach 0.95
• Range of 280 km (170 mi) with 10 minutes over the target
• Armoured protection for the pilot and the fuel tanks
• 4 × 12.7 mm (.5 in) or 2 × 20 mm or 30 mm guns
• A maximum of 2,200 kg (4,850 lb) empty weight and 4,700 kg (10,360 lb) max. weight

1:72 Fiat G.91R/2; '14-03' of Escuadron 143, Ala de Caza 14; Spanish Air Force (SPAF/Ejército del Aire); Los Llanos/Albacete, 1975 (Whif/Airfix kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Fiat G.91R/2; '14-03' of Escuadron 143, Ala de Caza 14; Spanish Air Force (SPAF/Ejército del Aire); Los Llanos/Albacete, 1975 (Whif/Airfix kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Fiat G.91R/2; '14-03' of Escuadron 143, Ala de Caza 14; Spanish Air Force (SPAF/Ejército del Aire); Los Llanos/Albacete, 1975 (Whif/Airfix kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


The challenge of providing an engine that matched the requirements of lightness and power, reliability and ease of maintenance was solved by using the Bristol Siddeley Orpheus turbojet.

Project selections took 18 months to complete and the final selection of the three remaining competing designs was planned for late 1957. In September 1957, at the Centre d'Essais en Vol at Brétigny-sur-Orge, in France, the three rival aircraft types met for evaluation trials. During the trials the Italian aircraft performed impressively and, in January 1958, the Fiat G.91 was officially declared the winner.

1:72 Fiat G.91R/2; '14-03' of Escuadron 143, Ala de Caza 14; Spanish Air Force (SPAF/Ejército del Aire); Los Llanos/Albacete, 1975 (Whif/Airfix kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Fiat G.91R/2; '14-03' of Escuadron 143, Ala de Caza 14; Spanish Air Force (SPAF/Ejército del Aire); Los Llanos/Albacete, 1975 (Whif/Airfix kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


Following a meeting of NATO Defence Ministers in April 1958 it was agreed that the G.91 would be the first NATO lightweight strike fighter. A production meeting was planned for May 1958 to discuss the production of the aircraft with financial support from the United States, the Americans would provide some of the finance for the French, German and Italian aircraft and pay for the Turkish aircraft. Other NATO states were supposed to buy the G.91, too., and the defence ministers reached agreement to order 50 aircraft for each country.

Given the large economic and commercial interests at stake, there was a certain amount of controversy surrounding this decision. After the loss of the G.91 prototype, the French government preferred to pursue development of the locally-designed Étendard. The British government similarly ignored the competition to concentrate on Hawker Hunter production for the same role.
The Italian government ordered the G.91 for the Italian Air Force before the results of the competition were known. An initial pre-production batch of machines would later go on to serve for many years with the Italian aerobatic team, the Frecce Tricolori as the G.91 PAN.

The G.91 was also considered by Austria, Norway, Spain, Greece, Switzerland, and even the United States Army, which briefly evaluated the type as a possible Forward Air Control aircraft before relinquishing all fixed-wing aircraft operations to the Air Force.

Spain bought the intended 50 aircraft (42 single seaters called G.91R/2, outfitting two fighter bomber squadrons, plus 8 trainers with tandem seats, comparable with the Italian G.91T/1 trainers), which were produced in Italy from early 1961 onwards and became operational with the Ejército del Aire in late 1962, replacing the F-86 and HA-220 Super Saetas in the ground attack/CAS role.

1:72 Fiat G.91R/2; '14-03' of Escuadron 143, Ala de Caza 14; Spanish Air Force (SPAF/Ejército del Aire); Los Llanos/Albacete, 1975 (Whif/Airfix kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Fiat G.91R/2; '14-03' of Escuadron 143, Ala de Caza 14; Spanish Air Force (SPAF/Ejército del Aire); Los Llanos/Albacete, 1975 (Whif/Airfix kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


The G.91R/2 was a hybrid between the simple Italian G.91R/1 and the later, more sophisticated G.91R/4 for Greece and Turkey. It used the R/1's airframe with the modified nose housing three cameras, but already had four underwing hardpoints, structural reinforcements and improved avionics, including a Doppler radar and a revised instrumentation that was also introduced with the Italian R/1A.

The G.91 in Spanish service was already phased out from the mid 70ies onwards and completely retired in 1986, being replaced by F-5 and Mirage F.1.




General characteristics:
    Crew: 1
    Length: 10.3 m (33 ft 9 in)
    Wingspan: 8.56 m (28 ft 1 in)
    Height: 4.0 m (13 ft 1 in)
    Wing area: 16.4 m² (177 ft²)
    Empty weight: 3,100 kg (6,830 lb)
    Loaded weight: 5,440 kg (11,990 lb)
    Max. takeoff weight: 5,500 kg (12,100 lb)

Powerplant:
    1× Bristol Siddeley Orpheus 803 turbojet, 22.2 kN (5,000 lbf)

Performance:
    Maximum speed: 1,075 km/h (580 kn, 668 mph)
    Range: 1,150 km (621 nmi, 715 mi)
    Service ceiling: 13,100 m (43,000 ft)
    Rate of climb: 30 m/s (6,000 ft/min)
    Wing loading: 331 kg/m² (67.8 lb/ft²)
    Thrust/weight: 0.42

Armament:
    4× 12.7 mm (0.50 in) M2 Browning machine guns,
    4× under-wing pylon stations holding up to 680 kg/1.500 lb of payload



Fun to build, and I must say that the "Minor Asia" scheme suits the Gina really well - much different from the standard European Grey/Green. And the result is not bad, if you consider the more than 30 year old basis kit.

1:72 Fiat G.91R/2; '14-03' of Escuadron 143, Ala de Caza 14; Spanish Air Force (SPAF/Ejército del Aire); Los Llanos/Albacete, 1975 (Whif/Airfix kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Fiat G.91R/2; '14-03' of Escuadron 143, Ala de Caza 14; Spanish Air Force (SPAF/Ejército del Aire); Los Llanos/Albacete, 1975 (Whif/Airfix kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Fiat G.91R/2; '14-03' of Escuadron 143, Ala de Caza 14; Spanish Air Force (SPAF/Ejército del Aire); Los Llanos/Albacete, 1975 (Whif/Airfix kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Fiat G.91R/2; '14-03' of Escuadron 143, Ala de Caza 14; Spanish Air Force (SPAF/Ejército del Aire); Los Llanos/Albacete, 1975 (Whif/Airfix kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

1:72 Fiat G.91R/2; '14-03' of Escuadron 143, Ala de Caza 14; Spanish Air Force (SPAF/Ejército del Aire); Los Llanos/Albacete, 1975 (Whif/Airfix kit conversion) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

 :cheers:

Offline Captain Canada

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Another beauty ! So much looks right about this aeroplane...love the colours and the weapons load. And of course, your excellent photos really bring her to life !

 :cheers:
CANADA KICKS arse !!!!

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Offline Dizzyfugu

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Thank you very much. Yes, that paint scheme suits the Gina really well.

The formation flight pic was a lucky find - but it looks so cool with the G.91 amid the SPAF aircraft, it was too tempting.  ;)

Offline Flyer

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Wow that looks great :thumbsup:

I know that straight wing jet in the formation pic but I don't remember what it is called, can someone remind me please?
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I know that straight wing jet in the formation pic but I don't remember what it is called, can someone remind me please?

They're Hispano HA-200 Saetas, the Spanish AF's advanced trainer at that time.

Has it ever been kitted? If so I've never seen one.
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

Offline Flyer

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I know that straight wing jet in the formation pic but I don't remember what it is called, can someone remind me please?

They're Hispano HA-200 Saetas, the Spanish AF's advanced trainer at that time.

Has it ever been kitted? If so I've never seen one.
Hispano's, of course :banghead:. They are the one's that have a double nose intake from memory.
Wanted to know what it was so I can look up some pics, it has exhausts located were I am thinking about putting them on something else and need some inspiration.

 :cheers:
Everything is theoretically impossible, until it is done. -Robert A. Heinlein

Offline Flyer

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Everything is theoretically impossible, until it is done. -Robert A. Heinlein

Online PR19_Kit

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Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings, and/or a longer fuselage

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

Offline Weaver

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Nice build of a difficult kit Dizzy (I had to do that intake duct mod on one as well). The colour scheme looks really good.  :thumbsup:
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Offline Dizzyfugu

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Thank you. Yes, the Airfix Gina is a tough one - but with some effort it builds into a surprisingly nice model!  :cheers:

Offline Glenn Gilbertson

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That looks great in the colour scheme! :thumbsup:

Offline DogfighterZen

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I love it, nice alternative to the normal colors used on this one! :thumbsup:
 :cheers:
"Sticks and stones may break some bones but a 3.57's gonna blow your damn head off!!"