Author Topic: Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF), ca. 1952  (Read 5119 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Dizzyfugu

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 8344
    • Lots of works in my FlickR gallery

1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


Some background:

The Supermarine Spitfire became the backbone of RAF Fighter Command, and saw action in the European, Mediterranean, Pacific and the South-East Asian theatres during World War II. Much loved by its pilots, the Spitfire served in several roles, including interceptor, photo-reconnaissance, fighter-bomber, carrier-based fighter, and trainer.

It was built in many variants, using several wing configurations. Although the original airframe was designed to be powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine producing 1,030 hp (768 kW), it was adaptable enough to use increasingly powerful Merlin and later Rolls-Royce Griffon engines producing up to 2,035 hp (1,520 kW) and was exported and used by many countries, even after WWII.


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


One of these operators was the Republic of China, which used late fighter versions like the powerful F Mk. 22 and the F Mk. 24. The Mk 24 was the last land-based fighter variant of the Spitfire. Very similar to Mk 22, this variant could also carry rocket projectiles and introduced some minor changes to equipment and installations, e .g. a larger, Spiteful-type tail with a double trim tab.


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


The Chinese Civil War was a civil war in China fought between forces loyal to the government of the Republic of China led by the Kuomintang (KMT) and forces of the Communist Party of China (CPC).
The war began in April 1927, amidst the Northern Expedition and essentially ended when major active battles ceased in 1950. The conflict eventually resulted in two de facto states, the Republic of China (ROC) in Taiwan and the People's Republic of China (PRC) in mainland China, both claiming to be the legitimate government of China.

From 1937 the USA started supplying aircraft to the KMT Air Force, and this support became especially clear from 1940, when the legendary „American Volunteer Group“ (later re-formed to become a part of the then US Army Air Force as the 23rd Fighter Group) – equipped with shark mouth-marked P-40s – was sent to China. From 1943 the USAAF also used bases in areas held by the Nationalists for flying B-29-raids against Japan. During the war, the USA supplied numerous P-40s, B-25s, and P-51Bs to the Nationalists, while the Communists also organized their own air force (or, better said, several of them), which flew a plethora of very different - mainly completely obsolete - aircraft.


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


By 1949 the KMT Air Force was a well-developed and equipped service, flying P-47 Thunderbolts, P-51 Mustangs, B-25 Mitchells and even B-24 Liberator bombers, as well as a considerable number of C-46 and C-47 transports.

After the Japanese capitulation, the US were concerned about the widespread communist influence, and decided to continue the support of the Nationalists. In 1945, for example, the whole 3rd Amphibian Group of the USMC landed in China in order to help establish a supply system for different Nationalist garrisons.


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


The Marines eventually pulled out of China by June of 1946, however, and the Nationalists were now to fight alone against the communists which were increasingly supported by the Soviets. In that struggle, neither their relatively powerful air force - which boasted 40 P-47Ds, some 60 P-51C/Ds and 40 each of B-24Js and B-25Cs - could help the Kuomintang, nor the - more or less - clandestine US support, via such „private“ enterprises like „China Nationalist Relief and Rehabilitation Administration Air Transport“ (CNRRAAT), led by US General Claude Chennault. After several bases in China were overrun by the Communists - Chennault was forced to retreat together with nationalist forces to Kumming, and then to Hong Kong.

By late 1948, the Communists controlled the whole central and eastern China, while the nationalists held only Beijing and Tientsin - both of which fell in early 1949. The USA restrained from getting directly involved in the conflict again, but continued flying reconnaissance missions along the Chinese borders – and sometimes also behind them.

During their final operations against the KMT, in early 1949, the Communists captured some 134 aircraft of the Kuomintang Air Force, and they managed to press quite a number of P-51Ds into service, while the Nationalists managed to evacuate some 110 aircraft (primarily P-51s) to Formosa, which provided the bulk of their fighter strength in the coming years.


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


After being forced to cease CNAF operations over mainland China, in June 1950 the Nationalists had also to retreat also their last ground forces back to Formosa. This pull-back was supported by the USN carrier-battle-group (CVBG) lead by USS Valley Forge (CVA-45), which subsequently also had to take care for the Nationalists not to mount any counter-offensive. With the start of the Korean War, however, the attention of both - the USA and China - was turned away from the situation around Taiwan, and for the next four years there were no additional clashes, while the Nationalists were able to consolidate their regime.


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


In May 1951 the USA have sent a small group of instructors to Taiwan, the task of which was to reorganize the Nationalist armed forces. By 1953, this job was completed so far that the Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF) could be equipped with more modern fighters, including enough Republic F-84G Thunderjets to form one squadron. Simultaneously, it still operated two squadrons of P-47s in the ground attack role and one of Spitfire Mk. 24s and one of P-51s, both of which as fighters. Additional deliveries were to follow soon, replacing the more and more outdated piston-powered aircraft.

The CNAF at the time was still in control of the airspace over the Fujian province, eastern Guangdong, and southern Zheijang. Most of the CNAF pilots were experienced from earlier operations during the Civil War and some were also recruited from the CAT, which was extensively involved in clandestine operations over mainland China at the time. They would badly need this experience very soon.


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr

Most of this background is based on http://www.acig.info/CMS/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=151&Itemid=47




The kit and its assembly:
Another what-if model, even though a simple one. I must admit that I am not a big fan of the Spitfire (as well as the Bf 109), so I prefer other types, but the late Griffon-powered versions got something beefy about them, so I gave in and did this one.

This whif was inspired by a fantasy side profile from whatifmodelers.com, created by fellow user Darth Panda who did a range of several late Spitfires in China Nationalist/Taiwanese markings – obviously inspired by a sheet from Tiger Wing Decals (for P-51s). Very plausible, though, and this is just my interpretation of that nice idea – and another contribution to the 2013 Asiarama Group Build of the forum.

The basis for the build is the excellent Special Hobby Spitfire F Mk. 24 kit, which actually contains a vast collection of optional parts that allow LOTS of land- and sea-based late Spitfires (as well as fictional combinations…) to be built. The parts are crisply molded, fit is very good and surface details are just great – the kit almost falls together. The thing is pricy, but you get good value and lots of spares for future projects.

The kit was built almost 100% OOB as a Mk. 24, I just modified the propeller with a metal axis so that it can spin freely (for the pictures). The drop tank comes from the kit, as well as the (empty) rocket attachment points under the wings.


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) - WiP by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) - WiP by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) - WiP by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) - WiP by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) - WiP by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


Painting and markings:
This whif was supposed to have a ‘Flying Tigers’ aura around it, so I settled for a simple Olive Drab/Neutral Grey livery, which was carried e. g. by P-47s. On a Spitfire this looks a bit odd, but that’s what makes the model interesting, as it combines a well-known and simple paint scheme with something unusual for it.

To add some excitement I decided to apply a worn and flaked look, with a primer coat in acrylic Aluminum (Revell) and some grinded salt as mask before the final colors were applied. Later the salt was rubbed away, revealing the bare metal in small clusters – the effect is good, even though the technique is rather dedicated to larger scale military vehicles.


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) - WiP by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) - WiP by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


The colors are ‘Olive Drab ANA 613’ from Modelmaster (#2050) and Humbrol 87 (Steel Grey) – the latter is lighter than true ‘Neutral Grey’ (e. g. FS 36173, Humbrol 176), which looks IMHO a bit dark on a 1:72 scale model. After a black ink wash the whole kit received additional weathering through dry-brushing, esp. on the upper surfaces in order to simulate sun-bleached paint. Tones used here are ‘Faded Olive Drab’ and FS 34087 from Modelmaster (#2051 and 1711), while Humbrol 128 (FS 36320) was used for the lower surfaces.

All interior surfaces were painted in Chromate Yellow primer – initially only as a color contrast to the green/grey livery, but later I found pics that suggest that such a color was actually used on/in the Mk. 22/24? Anyway it’s just for the look.


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) - WiP by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) - WiP by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) - WiP by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) - WiP by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


The decals were puzzled together. Roundels actually belong to a RoCAF F-100 (from a MicroScale sheet), the striped rudder was improvised and the tactical codes come from the scrap box. The shark mouth actually belongs to a Russian MiG-29, but makes a perfect detail on this Spitfire and suits the elegant aircraft very well! ;)


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr


1:72 Supermarine Spitfire F Mk. 24, aircraft “65” (s/n 50-0751) of 21st FS, 4th FG, Chinese Nationalist Air Force (CNAF); Formosa, ca. 1952 (Whif/Special Hobby Boss kit) by dizzyfugu, on Flickr



In the end, a simple project without much need for body work, and the worn look turned out very well!

Offline comrade harps

  • Full scale Arrow in basement
  • *****
  • Posts: 1126
  • Nearly vegan.
    • season creep
I like it.  ;D

The weathered olive drab really works (in fact, it's inspiring - I must try something like that on a weathered WW2 Japanese whif).

I've got a Special Hobby Seafire FR.47 in the stash and I hope I can make it look as good as your Spitty 24.
Member of the Deluded Dozen, the Blue Rose Society and Peninsula Poets.

Offline Dizzyfugu

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 8344
    • Lots of works in my FlickR gallery
It's probably the same kit! The Mk. 24 has so much optional parts to offer, I guess they have a standard sprue for all the late types and just add different fuselages and wings to the different boxes. It is, nevertheless, a great model kit with very good detail, and it goes together very well, too.

The faded look on this one turned out really well, I hope one can tell the "depth" impression of the paint from the pics. Using salt for masking is always a gamble, esp. on such a small item like a 1:72 Spitfire.

Offline PR19_Kit

  • Closeted Take That fan
  • What-IF SIG
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 27518
  • Whiffing since the 70s
That looks amazing Thomas, excellent work as usual.  :thumbsup: :bow:

I like your method of making the prop detachable, I may steal that for future use, thanks.  :thumbsup: ;D
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings

...and I'm not a closeted 'Take That' fan, I'm a REAL fan! :)

Regards
Kit

Offline Librarian

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2402
  • NOT a Monkey!
Beautiful. Just love that greasy, weathered effect. Feel the same about the Spits and 109s but I do like the Griffon Spits and Seafires....very purposeful looking. Currently doing a threesome of Seafire XVII, FR46 and F.32 Seafang. Very nice.

Offline Dizzyfugu

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 8344
    • Lots of works in my FlickR gallery
That looks amazing Thomas, excellent work as usual.  :thumbsup: :bow:

I like your method of making the prop detachable, I may steal that for future use, thanks.  :thumbsup: ;D

You're welcome, it's easy and in many cases better than the OOB solution. The Special Hobby Spitfire, for instance, does not offer any axis at all, just a central blob where you are supposed to attach the (nice, though) propeller. And nothing beats a truly spinning propeller on pictures!

Any many thanks for the feedback, highly appreciated!  :cheers:

Offline kitbasher

  • What-IF SIG
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 3852
  • bashes kits
'I am not a big fan of the Spitfire'

How VERY dare you, sir!

Apart from that - nice build  :thumbsup:
 
IPMS What If? & Secret Project SIG member.
On the go: Arrow, Beaumaris, Battle, Bronco GA.1, CASA 2.217, Corsair GR.1, EE P12, Hawker P1067, Hellcat IV, Ice Cream Tank, JP T4, Jumo MiG-15, Macchi MC.205, Meteor F.8R, Phantom FG1, SAAB J-29, Sea Hawk T7, Spitfire XII, Ta154, Val, Wellington.

Offline Dizzyfugu

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 8344
    • Lots of works in my FlickR gallery
'I am not a big fan of the Spitfire'

How VERY dare you, sir!

Apart from that - nice build  :thumbsup:
 

I am just honest...  ;)

Offline TallEng

  • Full scale Arrow in basement
  • *****
  • Posts: 1035
  • Often found barking up the wrong tree
What a lovely battered looking Spitfire :thumbsup:
And an absolutely splendid Sharks mouth too :cheers:
Well up to your usual standards :thumbsup:

Regards
Keith
The British have raised their security level from "Miffed" to "Peeved". Soon though, security levels may be raised yet again to "Irritated" or even "A Bit Cross". Londoners have not been "A Bit Cross" since the Blitz in 1940 when tea supplies ran out for three weeks

Offline Dizzyfugu

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 8344
    • Lots of works in my FlickR gallery
Thank you, too!  :lol:

The most ironic thing is that the shark mouth comes from a MiG-29 - and it even looks good. How anachronistic can a whif be?  :party:

Offline Kerrillc

  • Makes own decals
  • ***
  • Posts: 358
Well that's a very effective weathered (distressed) colour scheme. And I do like the shark mouth, just right!

I have a Special Hobby Spitfire so, I'll (with your permission) use the same metal axle idea!

Oh by the way, is Claude Chennault related to Claire Lee Chennault?

Yours tongue in cheek

Kerrill



If I am targetted by JMNs, I'm in good Company.

No, no, no! You do not die for your country, you make the other one die!

Offline Nils

  • Belgium's "Iceman"
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 5652
  • Za Rodina!!!
one of the best spitfire whiffs ive seen so far  :thumbsup:
very nicely done!
on the bench:

-all kinds of things.

Offline Dizzyfugu

  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 8344
    • Lots of works in my FlickR gallery
one of the best spitfire whiffs ive seen so far  :thumbsup:
very nicely done!

Oh, that's too much honor  :party:

But many thanks for your interest!  :cheers: