Author Topic: Fairchild C-82, C-119 Boxcar, AC-119G Shadow and AC-119K Stinger, XC-120 Pack Plane  (Read 12558 times)

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Offline Aircav

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Does anyone know who operated Fairchild C-119 Boxcar's that were fitted with wing drop tanks ?
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Offline Geoff

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The USAF AC-119K gunships had underwing jet pods, but I don't know about underwing droptanks.

Offline Aircav

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Its just that I found this picture and wondered who used them other than the USAF
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Offline philp

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Aircav,
That is the YC-119H, extended wings and tailplane, underwing fuel tanks fitted, two 3.500 horsepower R-3350-85 engines. Only one converted (51-2585).

Did a quick search and can find no evidence of any other C-119s with fuel tanks.

Hope that helps.
Phil Peterson

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Offline Aircav

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Hi Philip
thanks for the information I didn't know what mark C-119 it was, looks really cool so some of the mods may end up on an Italeri C-119 I have  ;D
All the best and many thanks
Steve
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Offline tinlail

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Does any one have an idea of the size of the plane? I have the notion that cargo section should be cut out and replaced way of holding standard sized ISO shipping containers. But I don't know if the plane is big enough for that.

Offline Aircav

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From what I can find on the net it had a span of 148ft, a length of 95ft 8inch and was powered by two 3500hp R-3350-30W engines and was name the SkyVan.
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Offline joncarrfarrelly

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Does any one have an idea of the size of the plane? I have the notion that cargo section should be cut out and replaced way of holding standard sized ISO shipping containers. But I don't know if the plane is big enough for that.

You mean like the C-119 modified into the XC-120 PackPlane?









The cargo pod had a volume of 2700 cubic feet.

Further to the XC-119H, according to Aerofiles the under wing tanks contained all of the aircraft's fuel, they weren't droptanks.  ;D :o
Evidently it was an unsuccessful competitor for the contract awarded to the C-130.

Jon

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Must leave successors more corrupted still."
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Offline tinlail

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Yes I do. Though I was thinking of the front end looking more like the skycrane.
However giving it brief look I see that a empty container weighs 8,380 lb, a full one can be up to 67,200 lb

And the C-119 has a payload of 10,000 lb.

So never mind.

Offline Jeffry Fontaine

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Your ISO containers usually come in two standard sizes.  8.0' X 8.0' X 20.0' and 8.0' X 8.0' X 40.0' with variations on that standard theme in length and height.  The C-119 would be able to accomodate a 20.0' ISO container with ease but that 40.0' container might be sticking out of the back end. 

On another note.  Does anyone remember the old Aurora C-119 kit and what was the scale of that model?  I remember seeing one on the shelf of a hobby shop many years ago, I figure it is about as rare as the 1/48th scale CH-47 Chinook by now. 
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Offline famvburg

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     1/77, IIRC.


Your ISO containers usually come in two standard sizes.  8.0' X 8.0' X 20.0' and 8.0' X 8.0' X 40.0' with variations on that standard theme in length and height.  The C-119 would be able to accomodate a 20.0' ISO container with ease but that 40.0' container might be sticking out of the back end. 

On another note.  Does anyone remember the old Aurora C-119 kit and what was the scale of that model?  I remember seeing one on the shelf of a hobby shop many years ago, I figure it is about as rare as the 1/48th scale CH-47 Chinook by now. 

Offline joncarrfarrelly

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The belly pod on the XC-120 is easily forty feet long just based on volume and isn't sticking all that far out in front of the aircraft.

XC-120 pod = 2,700 cubic feet

40 foot ISO = 2,560 cubic feet


As to weight, there is no reason and air-mobile ISO container couldn't be aluminum or plastic composite, probably a mix of both.

Jon
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Offline Jeffry Fontaine

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The belly pod on the XC-120 is easily forty feet long just based on volume and isn't sticking all that far out in front of the aircraft.

XC-120 pod = 2,700 cubic feet

40 foot ISO = 2,560 cubic feet


As to weight, there is no reason and air-mobile ISO container couldn't be aluminum or plastic composite, probably a mix of both.

The ISO containers are already available in aluminium as well as steel so that would be no problem to strap an alloy ISO container to the XC-120.  I would imagine a need for some kind of strap-on aerodynamic fairing feature for the ISO container to give it slightly less resistance when attached to the carrier aircraft. 



The other reason for making a comment was to add this to the discussion.

How about a turbine conversion for the C-119?  Swap the radial engines out for something a bit more modern and slightly more efficient.  Maybe adapt the RR Tyne to fit on the C-119?  It certainly has a diameter that is very close to the current C-119 engine nacelles so the only real challenge is to determine how best to route the turbine exhaust to exit behind the main landing gear.  Source for the RR Tynes?  Two choices in 1/72nd scale at the moment, bot from Revell of Germany, one is the Breguet Atlantic and the other is the Transall C-160.  The down side is the cost as both kits are quite expensive acquisitions for just parts unless you go in on a joint purchase with someone that has plans for the fuselage sans engines.  A RR Tyne powered C-119 would certainly look interesting as a WHIF in the markings for the  French AdA or one of the Commonwealth Air Forces instead of the Transall C-160, ("What if the Transall C-160 was never produced?").

Reference links:

Wikipedia - C-119 Flying Boxcar
Wikipedia - XC-120 Packplane
Wikipedia - C-82 Packet
Wikipedia - AC-119
Gunships
Gunships - AC-119G Shadow and AC-119K Stinger
Wikipedia - Transall C-160
Wikipedia - Breguet Atlantic
Wikipedia - C-130 Hercules
Wikipedia - AC-130 Spectre
Joe Baugher's American Military Aircraft
Joe Baugher's American Military Aircraft - American Military Transport Aircraft
National Museum of the U.S. Air Force
]National Museum of the U.S. Air Force Fact Sheet - C-119J Flying Boxcar
National Museum of the U.S. Air Force Fact Sheet - AC-119K Stinger
« Last Edit: August 21, 2009, 04:46:47 pm by Jeffry Fontaine »
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Offline famvburg

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         Why behind the gear? There should be plenty of room out the side(s) of the nacelle. As for TPs, I'd go for Allisons from a C-130 or P-3. Would the Tyne's cowls be that close anyway? Not having anything handy to compare, anyway. I like the Allisons, tho.

The belly pod on the XC-120 is easily forty feet long just based on volume and isn't sticking all that far out in front of the aircraft.

XC-120 pod = 2,700 cubic feet

40 foot ISO = 2,560 cubic feet


As to weight, there is no reason and air-mobile ISO container couldn't be aluminum or plastic composite, probably a mix of both.

The ISO containers are already available in aluminium as well as steel so that would be no problem to strap an alloy ISO container to the XC-120.  I would imagine a need for some kind of strap-on aerodynamic fairing feature for the ISO container to give it slightly less resistance when attached to the carrier aircraft. 



The other reason for making a comment was to add this to the discussion.

How about a turbine conversion for the C-119?  Swap the radial engines out for something a bit more modern and slightly more efficient.  Maybe adapt the RR Tyne to fit on the C-119?  It certainly has a diameter that is very close to the current C-119 engine nacelles so the only real challenge is to determine how best to route the turbine exhaust to exit behind the main landing gear.  Source for the RR Tynes?  Two choices in 1/72nd scale at the moment, bot from Revell of Germany, one is the Breguet Atlantic and the other is the Transall C-160.  The down side is the cost as both kits are quite expensive acquisitions for just parts unless you go in on a joint purchase with someone that has plans for the fuselage sans engines.  A RR Tyne powered C-119 would certainly look interesting as a WHIF in the markings for the  French AdA or one of the Commonwealth Air Forces instead of the Transall C-160, ("What if the Transall C-160 was never produced?").

Reference links:

Wikipedia - C-119 Flying Boxcar
Wikipedia - XC-120 Packplane
Wikipedia - C-82 Packet
Wikipedia - AC-119
Gunships
Gunships - AC-119G Shadow and AC-119K Stinger
Wikipedia - Transall C-160
Wikipedia - Breguet Atlantic
Wikipedia - C-130 Hercules
Wikipedia - AC-130 Spectre
Joe Baugher's American Military Aircraft
Joe Baugher's American Military Aircraft - American Military Transport Aircraft
National Museum of the U.S. Air Force
]National Museum of the U.S. Air Force Fact Sheet - C-119J Flying Boxcar
National Museum of the U.S. Air Force Fact Sheet - AC-119K Stinger

Offline Jeffry Fontaine

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Hyperscale has posted a few images (33 to be exact) of the Testor's (Italeri) 1/72 scale AC-119K Gunship named "The Super Sow" built by IPMS Guatemala member Eduardo Arguijo.  It appears that Eduardo put a lot of time and effort into this model and it shows in his attention to the small details. 
« Last Edit: September 11, 2009, 04:04:22 am by Jeffry Fontaine »
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