Author Topic: Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread - Early Danish Lightning  (Read 907880 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline SPINNERS

  • Strike Fighters WHIF Master
  • Moderator
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2547
Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1980 on: January 12, 2019, 05:03:22 am »
Vought A-7B Corsair - 57th Fighter Weapons Wing, Tactical Air Command, USAF, 1966

In early 1961, the United States Navy announced a development study for a replacement for the Douglas A-4 Skyhawk announcing the VAL (Heavier-than-air, Attack, Light) competition stipulating that all proposals had to be based on existing designs and with increased range and payload when compared to the A-4 plus increased accuracy in the delivery of weapons. This coincided with the appointment of Robert McNamara as the new Secretary of Defense for the incoming John F. Kennedy presidency and McNamara wasted no time in directing the Air Force to adopt both the Navy's F-4 Phantom and the Navy's new VAL program.

Vought's VAL proposal to the Navy was based on their F-8 Crusader fighter, having a broadly similar configuration but noticeably shorter and without the variable incidence wing feature. To achieve the required range, Vought's proposal was powered by a single Pratt & Whitney TF30-P-6 turbofan producing over 11,000 lbs thrust and growth/export potential was built in thanks to a modular engine bay designed to also accept the promising Rolls-Royce RB.168 (Spey) turbofan. In addition, Vought squeezed in an impressive array of cutting-edge avionics including the AN/APQ-116 radar, the ILAAS digital navigation system, a digital weapons computer, a Marconi-Elliott HUD and an innovative projected map display system. Unsurprisingly, Vought's design was selected as the winner on February 11th,1963 and they soon received a production contract for an initial batch of 400 aircraft designated A-7 and consisting of 200 A-7A's for the Navy and 200 A-7B's for the Air Force. In early 1964, the aircraft received the name Corsair II (after Vought's successful F4U Corsair of World War 2 and Korea fame) and the A-7 had an incredibly fast and smooth development with the YA-7A making it's first flight on October 31st, 1964.

Whilst some priorty was given to the production of the A-7A for the Navy, the A-7B first entered service in August 1966 with the 57th Fighter Weapons Wing based at Luke AFB Arizona and they were soon followed by the 354th Tactical Fighter Wing based at Myrtle Beach AFB, South Carolina with the 354th later deploying to Korat Royal Thai AFB, Thailand in April 1967.









Quite a subtle one this as the USAF did, of course, operate the Corsair in it's A-7D version. I'm basing this on the early USAF Phantoms which had the USN grey/white scheme and quite smart they looked too! The backstory brings everything forward a bit but Vought did ever so well in real life with the A-7 program.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2019, 05:06:00 am by SPINNERS »

Offline SPINNERS

  • Strike Fighters WHIF Master
  • Moderator
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2547
Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1981 on: January 12, 2019, 11:08:58 am »
Vought A-7B Corsair - 355th Tactical Fighter Squadron, USAF, 1968











I've used the SEA Camo from the Portuguese A-7P (so don't look too close as you'll see bi-lingual stencilling) and I've also removed the bolt-on refuelling probe from the starboard nose although some of the 'dirt' shading is still visible.

Offline SPINNERS

  • Strike Fighters WHIF Master
  • Moderator
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2547
Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread - Tornado IS (India)
« Reply #1982 on: January 13, 2019, 09:58:06 am »
Panavia Tornado IS 'Bavandar' - No.28 Squadron, Indian Air Force, 1985











In my absence from SF2 there's been a couple of revamps of the original Tornado 3D model covering virtually all versions across all the Tornado users and one of Italian versions contained this excellent skin AMI Camo which I've used here to create an Indian 'Bavandar'. It certainly would have met their Deep Penetration Strike Aircraft requirement better than the Jaguar but would have been delivered about 6 years later and there seemed to a real urgency to replace the Canberra and Hunter. The Jaguar seems set to continue in IAF service for many years to come with INS upgrades underway and even re-engining being considered.

Offline SPINNERS

  • Strike Fighters WHIF Master
  • Moderator
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2547
Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1983 on: January 14, 2019, 12:02:40 pm »
BAC Panther FGR.1 - No.54 Squadron, RAF Strike Command, 1971

After a couple of blissful years when it was allowed to proceed in relative peace and quiet, 1963 was not a good year for the TSR.2 programme.

At the start of the year both Olympus 22R test engines at BAC's Patchway engine testing facility were playing up with LP shaft problems and turbine disc failures eventually traced to high-frequency oscillations of the LP shaft. With a view to reducing the unit cost per aircraft an export order to Australia was deemed vital to the TSR.2 programme but when technical reports got back to the Australian Prime Minister, Robert Menzies, he publicly stated that Australia couldn't wait for the TSR.2 and that they needed to replace their ageing Canberra's within three years. With the British opposition Labour party openly stating that they "would cancel the TSR.2 when elected" the Australian government felt that they simply dare not rely on an aircraft that might not get built so it was no real surprise when on October 24th, 1963 Menzies signed for 24 F-111C's at a cost of US$ 91million. In early November 1963, whilst still reeling from that blow, BAC were devastated when a prototype Olympus 22R engine blew up under the Vulcan test bed at Filton destroying not only the engine but also the heavily instrumented Vulcan.

By this time, Britain had a new Prime Minister after Alec Douglas-Home had succeeded an ailing Harold Macmillan in October 1963. Douglas-Home knew that his Conservative government, still unpopular from the Profumo scandal, would likely lose the forthcoming General Election to a resurgent Labour party under the leadership of Harold Wilson. Therefore, in a bold move, Douglas-Home decided to take away one of Wilson's Tory-bashing weapons by cancelling the TSR.2 programme himself and BAC's recent woes played right into his hands. The assassination of US President John F Kennedy in Dallas on November 22nd, 1963 allowed Douglas-Home to quietly announce the cancellation of the TSR.2 the day following Kennedy's tragic death to a nation and a world focused on just one sad story.

British interest in variable-geometry (VG) had stemmed from Dr. Barnes Wallis' 1944 studies on 'polymorphic' aircraft but whilst English Electric had finally settled on a small, highly blown, fixed wing design for the TSR.2 both they and the counterparts at Vickers had sketched many and various VG designs for aircraft ranging in size from small supersonic light-attack aircraft to supersonic airliners. In early 1964, with the RAF still looking for a Hunter replacement, BAC dusted off their private-venture P.45 design for a small VG fighter-bomber powered a single afterburning Spey turbofan and gambled on an eager RAF requiring slightly more range and payload so they designed an overall larger aircraft powered by two turbofan engines in the 16,000lbs thrust category. With engines generally taking longer development time than airframes this could have caused BAC considerable problems but Rolls-Royce and MAN-Turbomotoren had already been running the RB.153 turbofan since November 1963 and were confident of upsizing this advanced three-shaft turbofan "to fit anything up to F-4 size" and BAC confidently settled on the RB.199 engine proposed by Rolls-Royce. With a view to making their new aircraft design as marketable as possible BAC named it the MRCA-70 (Multi-Role Combat Aircraft for 1970) and were soon waving brochures around the Air Ministry and posting copies to senior RAF officials.

Having lost the TSR.2 (and feeling sour at the prospect of being forced into adopting Mountbatten's beloved F-4 Phantom) the RAF were desperate to order the MRCA-70 and politics once again played it's part. Labour leader Harold Wilson stated that "only Labour could lead the technological revolution necessary for a modern Britain". So, to counter this, on April 6th, 1964 Alec Douglas-Home announced that Britain was to develop it's own variable-geometry multi-role combat aircraft and that contracts would be placed with the British Aircraft Corporation for 120 MRCA-70 aircraft for delivery in the 1969 to 1970 timeline to replace Hunters and Canberras in the strike/attack role and that further orders were likely to replace Lightnings in the air defence role. In 1966 the aircraft was christened Panther by BAC and development moved swiftly with the first flight of the prototype taking place on April 1st, 1968 as part of the celebrations to mark the RAF's 50th anniversary. Development and testing continued during 1968 and 1969 and in November 1970 No. 228 Operational Conversion Unit at RAF Coningsby became the first squadron to equip with the Panther FGR.1 followed in March 1971 by No.54 Squadron at RAF Coltishall.















Just a crazy attempt to get the Tornado Panther in service during before 'B' type roundels came in!!
« Last Edit: January 17, 2019, 09:51:21 am by SPINNERS »

Offline SPINNERS

  • Strike Fighters WHIF Master
  • Moderator
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2547
Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1984 on: January 16, 2019, 03:51:44 am »
Bell-Fiat Aviazione F-109A Airacobra II - 154 Gruppo, 6 Stormo, Aeronautica Militare, 1968













This is the Bell D-188, a proposed eight-engine Mach 2 VTOL fighter for the USN and the USAF. Rather cheekily, Bell gave it the unofficial designations of XF3L-1 for the Naval version and XF-109 for the Air Force version but neither version was of real interest. But as this was at about the time that NATO was advocating various V/STOL requirements (like NBMR-3) then I've made it a joint venture between Bell and Fiat but it would probably have needed Germany to have come on board with a decent requirement to have given it the critical mass. Anyway, it's a lovely 3D mode by 'Velro2K' who is an Italian-American so I like putting his models in Italian service whenever I can!
« Last Edit: January 16, 2019, 08:07:24 am by SPINNERS »

Offline SPINNERS

  • Strike Fighters WHIF Master
  • Moderator
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2547
Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1985 on: January 17, 2019, 04:50:05 am »
Bell Aircraft Company F-109C Airacobra II - VF-1 'Wolfpack', United States Navy, 1974















The carrier shots were taken on three different sorties and, yes, those are carrier-based TSR.2's! I'll come back to these at some point. For the Airacobra II, I've used the silver skin that comes with the F-109 but just tinted it a bit darker and added some US Navy style white undersides (with a fairly crude wavy line) and white control surfaces.


Offline SPINNERS

  • Strike Fighters WHIF Master
  • Moderator
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2547
Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread - Bell F-109C Airacobra II USN
« Reply #1986 on: January 18, 2019, 05:20:20 am »
Grumman E-2K Hawkeye AEW.1 - 849 Naval Air Squadron, Royal Navy, 1982













The E-2C is a non-flyable aircraft from the excellent 'Strike Fighters:North Atlantic' and it can be made flyable with some simple edits to give it a surrogate pit. I've added RN markings to a late USN skin by 'pappychksix' but my new and original fin marking, based on 849's official shield has proved to be problematic as it goes where three meshes come together and doesn't quite work as a decal or when painted directly on the skin. I'll probably have to move it down below where the end of the horizontal tail breaks through the fin and the rudder. I'll switch to 'V' for HMS Vindictive one of the super carriers the Senior Service got during the 1980's.

Nurse! My medicine please!




Now available for download at Combat Ace!
« Last Edit: January 18, 2019, 09:03:16 am by SPINNERS »

Offline SPINNERS

  • Strike Fighters WHIF Master
  • Moderator
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2547
Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1987 on: January 19, 2019, 09:55:53 am »
Republic P-72C Superbolt - 51º Stormo, Aeronautica Militare, 1948











This is the P-72 Superbolt by the DAT group of modders and I've used the NMF skin by 'Charles' with some over-painting of the USAAF markings and added my own AMI decals. I've visited the Superbolt a few times now (including USAAF with invasion stripes, SEAC and post-war German Air Force) and will certainly come back to it again.

Sadly, I have to report that my external hard drive that had about eight years of my Strike Fighters stuff on it is now officially dead. I've tried everything to get the data off it and studied all the relevant YouTube clips, etc,  culminating in me carefully opening it up and fiddling... but it's just not working. I've tried everything but now I have to accept that it's a goner. It's quite ironic that when I knew my old PC was about to go t*ts up in 2016, I transferred all my stuff onto this (then) new 1TB Seagate external hard drive so I wouldn't lose my data not thinking that it would fail to work. But 18 months of idleness during my time away from Strike Fighters clearly did it no good. About 80-90% of my decals have survived thanks to an earlier back-up onto CD's but all my aircraft and aircraft templates have gone.

Offline SPINNERS

  • Strike Fighters WHIF Master
  • Moderator
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2547
Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1988 on: January 20, 2019, 07:57:33 am »
Martin-Baker Vortex FB.2 - No.6 Squadron, RAF Middle-East Command, 1949











Another DAT classic that I've revisited a few times since it was originally released. For this one I've just added No.6 squadron 'JV' codes and their iconic 'Flying Canopener' motif. It runs rings around the stock 'enemy' aircraft (Spitfire Mk.9's).

Offline SPINNERS

  • Strike Fighters WHIF Master
  • Moderator
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2547
Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1989 on: January 21, 2019, 07:14:19 am »
Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-19SK "Farmer-N" - 3 Escuadrilla de Caza y Ataque, Comando de la Aviación Naval, 1970











This is another cracker by 'Cocas' with a really nice Soviet Navy skin by 'Nyghtfall' (one of six he did for it actually) and I've placed it in service with the Argentine Navy. I did look at a possible backstory and went to the wiki page on Argentine relations with the Soviet Union and whilst there are entries for 1946 and 2010 there's nothing inbetween! What I did learn was that there are 170,000 people of Russian descent living in Argentina. Who knew? Anyway, back to the MiG-19SK - I'm sure you'll agree that the front end would pass for a Supermarine design so I'll take a look at doing a Fleet Air Arm bird at some point in the future.

Additional Note From Weaver

Just worth noting that this is based on a model by our very own Dizzyfugu, used with full permission and credit by the Combat Ace guys:

https://combatace.com/forums/topic/91076-caf-team-mig-19sk/
« Last Edit: January 27, 2019, 01:27:36 am by SPINNERS »

Offline SPINNERS

  • Strike Fighters WHIF Master
  • Moderator
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2547
Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread - TSR Tuesdays
« Reply #1990 on: January 22, 2019, 05:41:23 am »
TSR Tuesdays (Two's days)  :lol:

I've been looking through some of the new stuff released during my 27-month absence from SF2 and there was a veritable TSR.2 anthology released by 'sundowner'. There's 13 different versions and with an average of 4 camo schemes in each version I plan to show one per week on a Tuesday evening for the rest of the year. I've chosen a Tuesday as this my admin' day for my other hobby/sport (cycling) and I can just use these ready-made what-if's and just take some screenshots.

Look out for the first one this evening!
« Last Edit: January 22, 2019, 11:15:12 am by SPINNERS »

Offline SPINNERS

  • Strike Fighters WHIF Master
  • Moderator
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2547
Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread - Announcing TSR Tuesdays
« Reply #1991 on: January 22, 2019, 11:12:15 am »
Boeing F-112J Thunderstrike - VMFA-232, United States Marine Corps, 1972















OK to start TSR Tuesdays here is 'Sundowners' VMFA-232 TSR.2 that popped up on one of my carrier shots upthread. Picture 2 really shows off some of the mods he has envisioned for this TSR.2 development which has seen Boeing team-up with BAC to develop and market 'Her Majesty's Needle-Nosed Wonder Bird' and this is mild compared to some of the later developments. I've decided NOT to show these in a chronological order but will just flit about the 13 different versions he has created and I might even throw a few in of my own as I like a more traditional TSR.2 although that's probably because my Corgi diecast (sorry to swear) model is within touching distance of my new desktop (naturally on a shelf above the FB-111A).


Offline SPINNERS

  • Strike Fighters WHIF Master
  • Moderator
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2547
Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread - Boeing F-112J Thunderstrike
« Reply #1992 on: January 23, 2019, 07:42:33 am »
Guys, I can't tell you how much I love this aircraft and the temptation to post more 'what if' TSR.2 screenshots is so powerful that I'm sitting on my hands* and I'm typing with my nose.

Our family moved from Swansea to Port Talbot in late 1973 and when I got around to joining the library they had just two aviation books; 'Gloster Aircraft Since 1917' (the Putnam book by Derek James) and 'The Gloster Meteor' by Edward Shacklady. Fine books which explains my love of the 'Meatbox' (and both books have since been purchased by me off eBay). This was in the days when if you asked for a book and the county library didn't have it they'd order the book in but I never did find out who it was locally who had the fascination with Gloster aircraft. Anyway, 'Attack Aircraft of the West' by Bill Gunston suddenly came into the library and the chapter on TSR.2 and a single photo of XR219 had a massive effect on a 13-year old Spinners. Of course, cancellation had happened about 10 years previously but it was clear that this aircraft was still awesome and better than anything in service and on the drawing board. Many years later Mrs. Spinners would become Assistant Librarian of that very same Library and when the book was thrown out about 30 years later she brought it home sadly without the dust jacket and photographs leading me to buy another copy off eBay.

* I've not done that since my one and only visit to a lap-dancing joint  :mellow:
« Last Edit: January 23, 2019, 07:44:24 am by SPINNERS »

Offline SPINNERS

  • Strike Fighters WHIF Master
  • Moderator
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2547
Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread - Boeing F-112J Thunderstrike
« Reply #1993 on: January 23, 2019, 11:22:52 am »
BAC Lightning F.56N - Ala N° 12, Ejército del Aire de España, 1972









A bit of a repeat this but at least they are all new screenshots.

Many years ago the Combat Ace website had a major makeover but there was a glitch with the downloads section leading to all the screenshots advertising each download going missing so I'm going to slowly work my way through my previously uploaded 'what ifs' and add the screenshot(s).


« Last Edit: January 23, 2019, 12:18:55 pm by SPINNERS »

Offline SPINNERS

  • Strike Fighters WHIF Master
  • Moderator
  • Needs A Life Outside What-If
  • *****
  • Posts: 2547
Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1994 on: January 25, 2019, 06:19:06 am »
Ilyushin Il-28 Beagle -  Grupo 1 de Bombardeo, Fuerza Aérea Argentina, 1961