Author Topic: Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread - Danish Ultra Sabres  (Read 850210 times)

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Offline SPINNERS

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Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1920 on: July 06, 2018, 10:58:30 am »
Focke-Wulf Project II - Jagdgeschwader 27, Luftwaffe 1946











A bit quick and dirty this one in so much that I haven't bothered with panel lines. This is one of the older Luft'46 aircraft available in 'Strike Fighters' and it's a tricky beast to fly... in fact, I've yet to take off and the screenshots are of my 'AI' flown wingman!
« Last Edit: July 06, 2018, 01:33:29 pm by SPINNERS »

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Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1921 on: July 08, 2018, 06:50:14 am »
North American F-107E Ultra Sabre - 492nd TFS, 48th TFW, USAFE, 1988









The F-107 will never win any beauty contests but I reckon it would look ace with the intake in the ventral position. Anyway, this is the F-107A 3D model by 'FastCargo' who also released an upgraded F-107C for SF2 which included this 'Hill' scheme which I've added to the SF1 F-107A and re-decaled to create a Lakenheath machine but I can't help feel that they'd have much rather kept their F-4D's! When I move back to SF2 I'll come back to this one.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2018, 08:52:15 am by SPINNERS »

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Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1922 on: July 09, 2018, 12:01:39 pm »
Northrop F-17C Cobra - 555th Tactical Fighter Squadron, USAF, 1980













This is a normal F-18A with a SEA skin by 'EricJ' a real F-18 aficionado. I decided to create an F-17C which had the same growth transition that the real YF-17 had on it's journey to become the F-18 and show it with 'Triple Nickel' markings in some sort of extended Vietnam war scenario.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2018, 12:11:50 pm by SPINNERS »

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Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1923 on: July 13, 2018, 12:53:48 pm »
McDonnell Douglas F-4E Phantom - 201 Squadron, Israeli Air Force, 1976







'What-If' a handful of the F-4E's quickly transferred to Israel during the Yom Kippur War of 1973 were older F-4E-35's and the Israeli Air Force decided to group them together in an Aggressor Flight? A nice easy one this as it uses a superb 'Ferris' like JASDF skin by 'sundowner' applied to the short cannon fairing F-4E-35 and with stock Israeli decals.

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Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1924 on: July 14, 2018, 10:22:19 am »
McDonnell Douglas F-4B Phantom - VMFA-251 'Thunderbolts', United States Marine Corps, 1972













Another 'sundowner' F-4EJ (JASDF) skin but this time adapted to fit the Third Wire F-4D (but badged up as an F-4B) and given some new VMFA-251 decals.




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Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1925 on: July 15, 2018, 04:39:43 am »
Hawker Hunter FGA.61 - 171 Filo, Turkish Air Force, 1962













I quite like the square 'roundels' of the Turkish Air Force and didn't realise that they were still in use as late as 1972 - I thought it might have been mid-1960's. I'll have to do some more. Anyway, the Hunter looks quite nice in them but, hey, it's the Hunter  :wub:

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Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1926 on: July 20, 2018, 12:05:27 pm »
Sukhoi Su-7A 'Fitter-A' - 111 Filo, Turkish Air Force, 1966









'What-If' Turkey was on the wrong side of the Iron Curtain at the end of WW2?


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Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1927 on: July 21, 2018, 05:11:34 am »
North American P-82B - Irish Air Corps, 1947













In game the P-82/F-82 is a tricky beast to fly! A couple of points - I should have used a less modern pilot and the serial numbers are from my Irish Hunters of a few years back and should be a slightly lower number. I'll come back and do a proper F-82 Night Fighter when I get back to SF2.

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Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1928 on: July 23, 2018, 03:23:03 am »
Saab J35F Draken - 712th Air Fighter Squadron, Romanian Air Force, 1971

After coming under Communist control in 1948, Romania was closely aligned with the international policies and goals of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. However by 1952, Gheorghiu-Dej (General Secretary of the Romanian Communist Party) had gained full control of the party and Romania began a slow disengagement from Soviet domination. During 1958 Soviet troops retreated from Romania and no Warsaw Pact troops were allowed on Romanian territory after 1962. Following Gheorghiu-Dej's death in March 1965 the Romanian Parliamentary elections brought Nicolae Ceausescu to power and Ceausescu continued to conduct a more independent foreign policy that was increasingly divergent from the Soviet Union. In 1967 Romania was the only Communist state to maintain diplomatic relations with Israel after the Six-Day War and Ceausecu followed this rebellious stance by establishing diplomatic relations with West Germany. In 1968 Romania was the only Warsaw Pact country to openly condemn the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia with Ceausescu publicly condemning the action in a major speech in the Great National Assembly as being "a big mistake and a serious danger to peace in Europe and to the fate of Communism in the world". The surge in Ceausescu's personal popularity emboldened the vain Ceausecu to announce that Romania would immediately become a non-aligned and a neutral state.

In October 1968, as a focal point for this neutrality, Ceausecu announced the purchase of 30 Saab J35F Drakens from Sweden for the Romanian Air Force and also announced the creation of an indigenous programme to create a light subsonic aircraft for ground attack and tactical reconnaissance (later to emerge as the IAR-93). The purchase of the Saab J35F was an inspired choice as the Draken was undoubtedly the best value fighter aircraft available anywhere in the late 1960's especially at a fly-away price of SwKr 6m (420,000) and the outstanding J35F featured the Ericcson PS-01 radar which was the longest-ranged set available anywhere in Western Europe until the F-15A entered front-line service in 1976. The first Romanian Drakens entered service during the Spring of 1969 with the 712th Air Fighter Squadron based at Baza 71 Aeriană, located near the town of Cmpia Turzii, and were followed by the 711th Air Fighter Squadron who exchanged their MiG-21's for Drakens during 1970.















The Draken was a technological marvel being superior to the contemporary Mirage III (except for top speed due to it's plain inlets) and it makes the Lightning look quite primitive although that's nobody at English Electric's fault who were, after all, asked to turn a research aircraft into an operational fighter - unlike Saab who really did start with a clean sheet of paper back in 1949! BTW once the Draken got the RM6C engine it's initial rate of climb of 50,000 ft/min matched that of the Lightning!

I'm not a fan of seeing roundels on fins so I've used a rudder flash in Romanian colours and used the wildly varying serial numbers seen on their MiG-21's (I've used 5724 to 9541) plus I've colourized a 712th Squadron badge ('Vis Lupi Est Grex'). On the armament side I've had to use Su-7 tanks as I haven't got the Draken tanks loaded and chose to make it use Soviet and Nato weapons.


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Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1929 on: July 24, 2018, 07:36:06 am »
FMA IA 58 Pucar - Grupul 9 Vnătoare, Romanian Air Force, 1973















This is the excellent Pucara add-on by 'Foxmonter' from Rosario, Argentina who also made the equally good FMA IAe 33 Pulqui II. Perhaps purchasing the relatively inexpensive Pucara for the close support mission enabled the Romanian Air Force to deploy a Hi-Lo mix?


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Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1930 on: July 26, 2018, 03:56:47 am »
Saab J29F Tunnan - 3rd Squadron, 18th Fighter Air Regiment, Bularian Air Force, 1964













My first Bulgarian 'what if' and I've created a completely fictional squadron 'nosebar' for the 3rd Squadron of the 18th Fighter Air Regiment who were in the real world a sort of Fighter OCU operating various MiG's before they disbanded in 1982. I've always had a soft spot for the Tunnan - a more sprightly aircraft than it looked and one that took centrifugal engines to their limit and the modified Ghost engine with an afterburner was actually lighter than a Sabre's J47.


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Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1931 on: July 27, 2018, 05:01:26 am »
Sukhoi Su-21M 'Fanwing-A' - Frontal Aviation, Soviet Air Force, 1990













This is the F/A-24 Shadowcat by 'Julhelm', a very talented Swedish modder and I did start doing a Swedish splinter camo before switching to a Soviet style camo but unfortunately I didn't take into account the different sizes used on the templates meaning the camo splodges are bigger on the fuselage than they are on the wings and vertical tail. I think I'll come back to this when I get back to SF2 as 'Julhelm' also released a revised version for SF2 and a template for his revised model.

BTW I think the NATO reporting name of 'Fanwing' suits a VG aircraft!


« Last Edit: July 27, 2018, 05:03:04 am by SPINNERS »

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Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1932 on: July 29, 2018, 01:15:41 am »
Grumman Tiger FGA.1 - No.1 Squadron, Royal Air Force, 1966

Despite the infamous 1957 White Paper (which dictated that the RAF would not need any manned combat aircraft whose role could be covered by missiles) by early 1960 the RAF had two main aircraft projects under development; OR339 for an advanced tactical strike and reconnaissance aircraft and OR356 for a common replacement for the RAF's Hawker Hunter fighter-bombers and the Royal Navy's Sea Vixen carrier-based fighters. Ideally, both projects required some consolidation of the UK aircraft industry with government organised mergers and soon English Electric, Vickers-Armstrong, Bristol and Hunting Aviation merged together to form the British Aircraft Corporation in 1960 to develop the TSR.2 to OR339.

Hawker Siddeley Aviation had already acquired Folland Aircraft in 1959 and followed this by acquiring de Havilland Aircraft Company and Blackburn Aircraft in 1960.  In 1961, they submitted their advanced P.1150 VTOL strike fighter to NATO Basic Military Requirement 3 (NBMR-3) calling for a supersonic V/STOL strike fighter with a combat radius of 460 kms and a dash speed of Mach 1.5 with a 910kg payload. However, changes made to the NBMR-3 requirement led to the P.1150 being considered to be undersized and therefore unsatisfactory leading to a redesign. A new and larger aircraft design, re-designated as the P.1154, soon emerged and was submitted by Hawker Siddeley Aviation to the Ministry of Aviation for both NATO NBMR-3 and to the UK's OR356. In May 1962, the P.1154 emerged as the 'technical winner' in the NBMR-3 competition but this did not lead to orders being placed as the French government withdrew from participation once the Dassault Mirage IIIV design had lost. NATO's NBMR-3 selection went unheeded by it's member nations and the whole project was terminated.

The loss of a potentially large NATO order immediately destabilized the P.1154 project and played right into the hands of the reluctant Admiralty who decided to buy the American F-4 Phantom aircraft as their Sea Vixen replacement, thus throwing the entire cost of development and production onto the RAF. In a statement to the House of Commons the Prime Minister explained, "I have to tell the House that this is not a practicable proposition. The problem here is that on these present estimated requirements, and on the latest realistic estimate of the remaining life of the Hunter aircraft, the P.1154 will not be in service in time to serve as a Hunter replacement. Sadly, the axe finally fell on the P.1154 on September 3rd, 1962.

Meanwhile, having failed to secure any US Navy contracts for their F11F-1F 'Super Tiger', Grumman had aggressively marketed the Super Tiger to foreign customers eventually gaining important export orders to Japan and Canada that had kept the Bethpage production line open. Having previously offered the West German Government a version of the F-11F-1F powered by the Rolls-Royce Avon 301R, rated at 12,500 lbs dry thrust and 16,360 lbs thrust with reheat, Grumman quickly dusted off the design and offered it to the UK Government as a Hawker Hunter replacement. With the RAF so focused on holding on to TSR.2 at all costs they were keen to adopt this off the shelf proposal that was far cheaper than any paper project so the Ministry of Aviation quickly created OR366 to cover the adoption of the Super Tiger. A production order for 200 Tiger FGA.1's was placed with Grumman on January 1963 with the first examples entering service in April 1964 with No.1 Squadron based at RAF Wittering.













The 'Super Tiger' is one of the relatively few 'what ifs' available in 'Strike Fighters' and the group of modders released it in West German colours (Luftwaffe and Marineflieger). I just has to overpaint the German national markings and decal it up in RAF colours. The backstory weaves a little bit of fact into a lot of fiction!

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Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread
« Reply #1933 on: August 03, 2018, 11:25:04 pm »
Rockwell F-31K Mustang II - Grupo 6 de Caza, Fuerza Aerea Argentina, 2018

The X-31 experimental jet fighter was designed and built by Rockwell and Messerschmitt-Blkow-Blohm as part of a joint US/Germany 'Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability' programme to test thrust vectoring technology in both pitch and yaw allied to an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight at very high angles of attack. Whilst being a radical new design the X-31 used a wide variety of parts from previous production aircraft including the F/A-18 Hornet front fuselage (including the cockpit, ejection seat and canopy) and the F-16 Fighting Falcon's landing gear plus the Cessna Citation's main landing gear wheels and brakes. This dramatically reduced the development time and risk by using flight-qualified components and enabled the first of just two X-31's to take to the air on October 11th, 1990 and over 500 test flights were flown between 1990 and 1995.

With a huge fall in defence spending from the 'peace dividend' Rockwell began to look at ways of using many of the X-31's technologies in a low-cost fighter aircraft and in 1992 they proposed an 'F-31' version powered by a non-afterburning version of the General Electric F110 turbofan rated at 16,000lbs dry thrust. Deleting the thrust-vectoring and afterburner reduced a considerable amount of weight from the rear fuselage and Rockwell calculated that the lack of an afterburner would give the small and light F-31 such an increase in range that most missions could be flown without external drop tanks. On the home-front Rockwell proposed an A-31 version to supplement and eventually replace the A-10 Thunderbolt claiming that the A-31 would be about one-half of the cost of the proposed A-16 Fighting Falcon.

But Rockwell's main efforts were on the export market and especially the Gulf States and Saudi Arabia and it was interest from the latter and also South Korea that encouraged Rockell to proceed with development at the end of 1993. Marketing their new fighter as the 'F-31 Mustang II' orders were placed by South Korea (72) and Saudi Arabia (59) followed by a home order of 30 aircraft for the US Navy to supplement their F-5E Aggressor Force and then 100 A-31C's for the US Air Force.

In December 1998, the Royal New Zealand Air Force became the third export customer when they placed an order for 34 F-31K's to replace it's ageing Skyhawks but the acquisition was cancelled by the new Labour government in March 2000 in a controversial move as "an air combat force is not a priority in the current benign security environment". With most of the F-31K's having already rolled off the production line Rockwell did not take the cancellation lightly and, faced with huge cancellation charges, the New Zealand government breathed a sigh of release when the Argentinian Government, led by Fernando de la Ra, negotiated the purchase of the 34 F-34K's for the Fuerza Aerea Argentina at a reduced price. Entering service with Grupo 6 de Caza in August 2001 the F-31K's continue in service based at the Tandil Military Air Base in the Buenos Aires Province.











This is a lovely 3D model by 'Dels' of the real X-31 with the thrust-vectoring paddles and 'Gepard' had the clever idea of removing them and also released this two-tone grey skin on his Luftwaffe version. I've switched to Argentinian markings and added a rather fanciful backstory!
« Last Edit: August 04, 2018, 02:34:28 am by SPINNERS »

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Re: Spinners' Strike Fighters Thread - Rockwell F-31K Mustang II
« Reply #1934 on: August 04, 2018, 02:12:25 am »
That's a very attractive aircraft  :thumbsup:
Decals my @r$e!